Cerrar

No. de sistema: 000035391

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 170518m20179999xx^^r^p^^^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-yu
a| ncbh---
044 _ _ a| xx
245 0 0 a| Connectivity and genetic structure of the queen conch on the Mesoamerican Reef
506 _ _ a| Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
520 1 _ a| The queen conch (Strombus gigas) is a commercially important marine invertebrate that is widely distributed throughout the western Atlantic, from Bermuda to Brazil. Intense exploitation has resulted in a decrease in population numbers of this species, which is listed as protected from commercial exploitation under IUCN and CITES. Previous studies on population genetics have demonstrated contrasting results in terms of the population structure of S. gigas. This research analyzed the genetic connectivity of the queen conch over a wide area of the Mesoamerican Reef System to determine whether S. gigas presents one panmictic population or a more complex structure. Furthermore, we evaluated the risk of local extinction by establishing the genetic diversity of the studied populations. High resolution was obtained for the five ISSR markers used for a total of 190 individuals, from seven localities along the Mesoamerican Reef. Our results reject the panmictic structure hypothesis for the queen conch in the study area and demonstrate genetic patchiness, indicating general homogeneity among localities that present an isolation-by-distance pattern. However, some genetic temporal variation was confirmed for the Cozumel locality. Furthermore, our results reveal self-recruitment for the Alacranes Reef aggregation and suggest sufficient connectivity with localities on the Caribbean coast to maintain high genetic diversity.
520 1 _ a| With regard to genetic diversity, the results demonstrate that the queen conch is not genetically threatened in the study area. This is probably due to high annual recruitment within Caribbean queen conch aggregations, and suggests that S. gigas is a highly resilient organism. We advocate that the appropriate management of S. gigas (fishing quota and/or closed season) must be followed to attain a rapid recovery of queen conch populations. This study represents a fundamental step in the understanding of the dynamic population structure of S. gigas in the Mesoamerican Reef and is an important contribution toward improving the future management of this commercially protected species.
533 _ _ a| Reproducción electrónica en formato PDF
538 _ _ a| Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior
650 _ 4 a| Strombus gigas
650 _ 4 a| Strombus gigas
650 _ 4 a| Gasterópodos
650 _ 4 a| Dinámica de la población
650 _ 4 a| Variación genética
651 _ 4 a| Sistema Arrecifal Mesoamericano
651 _ 4 a| Yucatán (Península) (México)
651 _ 4 a| Belice
700 1 _ a| Machkour M'Rabet, Salima
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Cruz Medina, Jorge
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| García de León, Francisco Javier
e| coaut.
n| 55989715700
700 1 _ a| De Jesús Navarrete, Alberto
c| Dr.
e| coaut.
n| 6602620188
700 1 _ a| Hénaut, Yann
c| Dr.
e| coaut.
773 0 _
t| Coral Reefs
g| Vol. 36, no. 2 (June 2017), p. 535–548
x| 1432-0975
900 _ _ a| Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| BG / MM
904 _ _ a| Mayo 2017
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
Cerrar
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Connectivity and genetic structure of the queen conch on the Mesoamerican Reef
Machkour M'Rabet, Salima (autor)
Cruz Medina, Jorge (autor)
García de León, Francisco Javier (autor)
De Jesús Navarrete, Alberto (autor)
Hénaut, Yann (autor)
Nota: Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
Contenido en: Coral Reefs. Vol. 36, no. 2 (June 2017), p. 535–548. ISSN: 1432-0975
No. de sistema: 35391
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
PDF


Inglés

"The queen conch (Strombus gigas) is a commercially important marine invertebrate that is widely distributed throughout the western Atlantic, from Bermuda to Brazil. Intense exploitation has resulted in a decrease in population numbers of this species, which is listed as protected from commercial exploitation under IUCN and CITES. Previous studies on population genetics have demonstrated contrasting results in terms of the population structure of S. gigas. This research analyzed the genetic connectivity of the queen conch over a wide area of the Mesoamerican Reef System to determine whether S. gigas presents one panmictic population or a more complex structure. Furthermore, we evaluated the risk of local extinction by establishing the genetic diversity of the studied populations. High resolution was obtained for the five ISSR markers used for a total of 190 individuals, from seven localities along the Mesoamerican Reef. Our results reject the panmictic structure hypothesis for the queen conch in the study area and demonstrate genetic patchiness, indicating general homogeneity among localities that present an isolation-by-distance pattern. However, some genetic temporal variation was confirmed for the Cozumel locality. Furthermore, our results reveal self-recruitment for the Alacranes Reef aggregation and suggest sufficient connectivity with localities on the Caribbean coast to maintain high genetic diversity."

"With regard to genetic diversity, the results demonstrate that the queen conch is not genetically threatened in the study area. This is probably due to high annual recruitment within Caribbean queen conch aggregations, and suggests that S. gigas is a highly resilient organism. We advocate that the appropriate management of S. gigas (fishing quota and/or closed season) must be followed to attain a rapid recovery of queen conch populations. This study represents a fundamental step in the understanding of the dynamic population structure of S. gigas in the Mesoamerican Reef and is an important contribution toward improving the future management of this commercially protected species."


  • Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior