Cerrar

No. de sistema: 000041111

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 190806m20199999xx^^r^p^^^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-yu
044 _ _ a| xx
245 0 0 a| Are Mayan community forest reserves effective in fulfilling people's needs and preserving tree species?
506 _ _ a| Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
520 1 _ a| Mayan community forest reserves (MCFR) play an important role in agricultural landscapes in Mexico, as theyprovide forest products and a broad variety of benefits that contribute to improving local people's livelihoods.Nevertheless, academia has generally considered conservation and use of forest resources to be incompatible. Wedescribe the spatial configuration of MCFR, evaluate floristic and structural characteristics of woody vegetation present in selected reserves, and identify social norms that govern use and conservation of MCFR. These reserves largely consist of mature vegetation (80% of total cover); their plant structure is similar to that of the sur-rounding tropical sub-deciduous forest; and they house a large number of endemic species. The MCFR studied contain a total of 146 tree species and cover 11% of the study area, which includes at least 140 villages in thenorth-central part of the Yucatan Peninsula. These reserves are collectively managed and conserved by Mayanpeasants in the interest of the common good. The communities in our study area combine conservation and useof forest resources, and we recommend that in public policy, government agencies and NGOs incorporate MCFRas a model of biological conservation and sustainable natural resource use, taking into account traditionalknowledge and local norms that allow these reserves to function in a sustainable manner.
533 _ _ a| Reproducción electrónica en formato PDF
538 _ _ a| Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior
650 _ 4 a| Bosque comunal
650 _ 4 a| Mayas
650 _ 4 a| Conocimiento ecológico tradicional
650 _ 4 a| Inventarios forestales
650 _ 4 a| Conservación de bosques
651 _ 4 a| Yucatán (Península) (México)
700 1 _ a| Levy Tacher, Samuel Israel
700 1 _ a| Ramírez Marcial, Neptalí
d| 1963-
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Navarrete Gutiérrez, Darío Alejandro
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Rodríguez Sánchez, Perla Victoria
e| coaut.
773 0 _
t| Journal of Environmental Management
g| Vol. 245 (September 2019), p. 16-27
x| 0301-4797
900 _ _ a| Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Agosto 2019
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Servibosques
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
906 _ _ a| Producción Académica ECOSUR
LNG eng
Cerrar
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Are Mayan community forest reserves effective in fulfilling people's needs and preserving tree species?
Levy Tacher, Samuel Israel (autor)
Ramírez Marcial, Neptalí, 1963- (autor)
Navarrete Gutiérrez, Darío Alejandro (autor)
Rodríguez Sánchez, Perla Victoria (autor)
Nota: Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
Contenido en: Journal of Environmental Management. Vol. 245 (September 2019), p. 16-27. ISSN: 0301-4797
No. de sistema: 41111
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
PDF
  • Consulta (1)




Inglés

"Mayan community forest reserves (MCFR) play an important role in agricultural landscapes in Mexico, as theyprovide forest products and a broad variety of benefits that contribute to improving local people's livelihoods.Nevertheless, academia has generally considered conservation and use of forest resources to be incompatible. Wedescribe the spatial configuration of MCFR, evaluate floristic and structural characteristics of woody vegetation present in selected reserves, and identify social norms that govern use and conservation of MCFR. These reserves largely consist of mature vegetation (80% of total cover); their plant structure is similar to that of the sur-rounding tropical sub-deciduous forest; and they house a large number of endemic species. The MCFR studied contain a total of 146 tree species and cover 11% of the study area, which includes at least 140 villages in thenorth-central part of the Yucatan Peninsula. These reserves are collectively managed and conserved by Mayanpeasants in the interest of the common good. The communities in our study area combine conservation and useof forest resources, and we recommend that in public policy, government agencies and NGOs incorporate MCFRas a model of biological conservation and sustainable natural resource use, taking into account traditionalknowledge and local norms that allow these reserves to function in a sustainable manner."


  • Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior