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No. de sistema: 000041994

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^z^^^4500
008 _ _ 170315m20179999xx^^r^p^^^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-ca
044 _ _ a| xx
100 1 _ a| Monzón Alvarado, Claudia María
245 1 0 a| Synergistic vulnerabilities
b| climate variability and fire management policy increase farming challenges in southeastern Mexico
506 _ _ a| Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
520 1 _ a| Agricultural fire for land preparation is central in the livelihoods of subsistence farmers practicing shifting cultivation. Achieving a good agricultural burn, one in which the biomass is thoroughly consumed within the chosen area, depends on specific weather conditions. Fire use decisions are also shaped by institutions that define the timing and rules for fire use but also constrain the alternatives and shape adaptive capacities. Global and regional climate changes interact with the institutional framing of fire management affecting local fire use and burn outcomes. These effects are documented and analyzed to suggest adaptations to existing governance systems. We examined subsistence farmers’ socio-ecological vulnerability in the Calakmul municipality, located in southeastern Mexico. Using interviews with farmers and government agents, as well as participatory mapping and observation of agricultural burns, we studied fire management knowledge, practices and burn outcomes. Our results describe a continuum of burn outcomes covering good agricultural burns, uncontrolled burns leading to wildfires and “malquemados” literally poorly burned areas. Malquemados represent unsuccessful combustion associated with excess moisture that results in scorched vegetation. We discuss how unexpected early rains trigger effects that cascade through space and the ecological, economic and cultural domains. We argue that fire management has been historically approached from a conservation standpoint yet agricultural fire use and wildfire prevention should also be addressed from a rural development perspective. This shift in fire management would lead to the proper inclusion of the entire array of burn outcomes in studies and policies addressing farmers’ vulnerability amplified by synergistic effects between climate variability and institutional change.
650 _ 4 a| Agricultura de subsistencia
650 _ 4 a| Manejo de incendios forestales
650 _ 4 a| Cambio climático
650 _ 4 a| Uso de la tierra
650 _ 4 a| Desarrollo rural
651 _ 4 a| Calakmul (Campeche, México)
700 1 _ a| Keys, Eric
e| coaut.
773 0 _
t| Regional Environmental Change
g| Vol. 17, no. 2 (February 2017), p. 489–500
x| 1436-378X
900 _ _ a| Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Marzo 2017
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Desastres
905 _ _ a| Calakmul
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
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*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Synergistic vulnerabilities: climate variability and fire management policy increase farming challenges in southeastern Mexico
Monzón Alvarado, Claudia María (autor)
Keys, Eric (autor)
Nota: Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
Contenido en: Regional Environmental Change. Vol. 17, no. 2 (February 2017), p. 489–500. ISSN: 1436-378X
No. de sistema: 41994
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
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"Agricultural fire for land preparation is central in the livelihoods of subsistence farmers practicing shifting cultivation. Achieving a good agricultural burn, one in which the biomass is thoroughly consumed within the chosen area, depends on specific weather conditions. Fire use decisions are also shaped by institutions that define the timing and rules for fire use but also constrain the alternatives and shape adaptive capacities. Global and regional climate changes interact with the institutional framing of fire management affecting local fire use and burn outcomes. These effects are documented and analyzed to suggest adaptations to existing governance systems. We examined subsistence farmers’ socio-ecological vulnerability in the Calakmul municipality, located in southeastern Mexico. Using interviews with farmers and government agents, as well as participatory mapping and observation of agricultural burns, we studied fire management knowledge, practices and burn outcomes. Our results describe a continuum of burn outcomes covering good agricultural burns, uncontrolled burns leading to wildfires and “malquemados” literally poorly burned areas. Malquemados represent unsuccessful combustion associated with excess moisture that results in scorched vegetation. We discuss how unexpected early rains trigger effects that cascade through space and the ecological, economic and cultural domains. We argue that fire management has been historically approached from a conservation standpoint yet agricultural fire use and wildfire prevention should also be addressed from a rural development perspective. This shift in fire management would lead to the proper inclusion of the entire array of burn outcomes in studies and policies addressing farmers’ vulnerability amplified by synergistic effects between climate variability and institutional change."