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No. de sistema: 000058832

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 180425m20179999xx^fr^p^o^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-ca
044 _ _ a| xx
100 1 _ a| Rojero Vázquez, Edgar
e| autor
245 1 0 a| Infection of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia spp. in opossums and dogs in Campeche, Mexico
b| the role of tick infestation
506 0 _ a| Acceso en línea sin restricciones
520 1 _ a| In recent years, some tick-borne diseases such as anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis became widespread worldwide, threatening the health of humans, domestic animals and wildlife. The aims of this study were to determine the presence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia canis, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis in 102 opossums (Didelphis spp.) and 44 owned free-ranging dogs in southeastern Mexico using a specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A. phagocytophilum was detected in opossums and dogs with a prevalence of 3 and 27%, respectively. E. canis was only present in 7% of dogs, while we didn't detect E. chaffeensis in any host. We report the first evidence of infections of A. phagocytophilum in Didelphis virginiana and D. marsupialis in Mexico. The infection rates and patterns we found of A. phagocytophilum suggest that dogs are more directly involved in the ecology of this pathogen than opossums. Despite the small prevalence found, our results are of public health concern because of the zoonotic capabilities of A. phagocytophilum, the high tick infestation rates found and because both opossums and free-ranging dogs can achieve high population densities in the region.
650 _ 4 a| Protozoarios
650 _ 4 a| Anaplasma phagocytophilum
650 _ 4 a| Ehrlichia canis
650 _ 4 a| Ehrlichia chaffeensis
650 _ 4 a| Zarigüeya
650 _ 4 a| Perros
650 _ 4 a| Zoonosis
650 _ 4 a| Salud pública
651 _ 4 a| Bobolá, Campeche (Campeche, México)
651 _ 4 a| Chiná, Campeche (Campeche, México)
651 _ 4 a| Miguel Alemán (X-Campéu), Campeche (Campeche, México)
700 1 _ a| Gordillo Pérez, Guadalupe
e| autora
700 1 _ a| Weber, Manuel
e| autor
773 0 _
t| Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution
g| Vol. 5, Art. no. 161 (December 2017), p. 637-665
x| 2296-701X
856 4 1 u| https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fevo.2017.00161/full
z| Artículo electrónico
856 _ _ u| http://aleph.ecosur.mx:8991/F?func=service&doc_library=CFS01&local_base=CFS01&doc_number=000058832&line_number=0001&func_code=DB_RECORDS&service_type=MEDIA
y| Artículo electrónico
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Abril 2018
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
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Infection of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia spp. in opossums and dogs in Campeche, Mexico: the role of tick infestation
Rojero Vázquez, Edgar (autor)
Gordillo Pérez, Guadalupe (autora)
Weber, Manuel (autor)
Nota: Acceso en línea sin restricciones
Contenido en: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. Vol. 5, Art. no. 161 (December 2017), p. 637-665. ISSN: 2296-701X
No. de sistema: 58832
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
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Inglés

"In recent years, some tick-borne diseases such as anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis became widespread worldwide, threatening the health of humans, domestic animals and wildlife. The aims of this study were to determine the presence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia canis, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis in 102 opossums (Didelphis spp.) and 44 owned free-ranging dogs in southeastern Mexico using a specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A. phagocytophilum was detected in opossums and dogs with a prevalence of 3 and 27%, respectively. E. canis was only present in 7% of dogs, while we didn't detect E. chaffeensis in any host. We report the first evidence of infections of A. phagocytophilum in Didelphis virginiana and D. marsupialis in Mexico. The infection rates and patterns we found of A. phagocytophilum suggest that dogs are more directly involved in the ecology of this pathogen than opossums. Despite the small prevalence found, our results are of public health concern because of the zoonotic capabilities of A. phagocytophilum, the high tick infestation rates found and because both opossums and free-ranging dogs can achieve high population densities in the region."