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No. de sistema: 000060341

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040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
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245 0 0 a| Identifying drivers of forest resilience in long-term records from the Neotropics
506 _ _ a| Acceso en línea sin restricciones
520 _ _ a| Here, we use 30 long-term, high-resolution palaeoecological records from Mexico, Central and South America to address two hypotheses regarding possible drivers of resilience in tropical forests as measured in terms of recovery rates from previous disturbances. First, we hypothesize that faster recovery rates are associated with regions of higher biodiversity, as suggested by the insurance hypothesis. And second, that resilience is due to intrinsic abiotic factors that are location specific, thus regions presently displaying resilience in terms of persistence to current climatic disturbances should also show higher recovery rates in the past. To test these hypotheses, we applied a threshold approach to identify past disturbances to forests within each sequence. We then compared the recovery rates to these events with pollen richness before the event. We also compared recovery rates of each site with a measure of present resilience in the region as demonstrated by measuring global vegetation persistence to climatic perturbations using satellite imagery. Preliminary results indeed show a positive relationship between pre-disturbance taxonomic richness and faster recovery rates. However, there is less evidence to support the concept that resilience is intrinsic to a region; patterns of resilience apparent in ecosystems presently are not necessarily conservative through time.
530 _ _ a| Disponible en línea
533 _ _ a| Reproducción electrónica en formato PDF
538 _ _ a| Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior
650 _ 4 a| Resiliencia ecológica
650 _ 4 a| Bosques tropicales
650 _ 4 a| Palinología
650 _ 4 a| Disturbio ecológico
650 _ 4 a| Paleoecología
651 _ 4 a| México
651 _ 4 a| América Central
651 _ 4 a| América del Sur
700 1 _ a| Adolf, Carole
e| autora
700 1 _ a| Tovar, Carolina
e| autora
700 1 _ a| Kühn, Nicola
e| autora
700 1 _ a| Behling, Hermann
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Berrio, Juan Carlos
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Domínguez Vázquez, Gabriela
e| autora
700 1 _ a| Figueroa Rangel, Blanca Lorena
e| autora
n| 6507781926
700 1 _ a| Gonzalez Carranza, Zaire
e| autora
700 1 _ a| Islebe, Gerald A.
c| Doctor
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Hooghiemstra, Henry
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Neff, H.
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Olvera Vargas, Miguel
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Whitney, Bronwen
e| autora
700 1 _ a| Wooller, Matthew J.
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Willis, Katherine Jane
e| autora
773 0 _
t| Biology Letters
g| Vol. 16, no. 4 (March 2020), p. 1-7
x| 1469-6711
856 4 1 u| https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/pdf/10.1098/rsbl.2020.0005
z| Artículo electrónico
902 _ _ a| BG / MM
904 _ _ a| Mayo 2020
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
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"Here, we use 30 long-term, high-resolution palaeoecological records from Mexico, Central and South America to address two hypotheses regarding possible drivers of resilience in tropical forests as measured in terms of recovery rates from previous disturbances. First, we hypothesize that faster recovery rates are associated with regions of higher biodiversity, as suggested by the insurance hypothesis. And second, that resilience is due to intrinsic abiotic factors that are location specific, thus regions presently displaying resilience in terms of persistence to current climatic disturbances should also show higher recovery rates in the past. To test these hypotheses, we applied a threshold approach to identify past disturbances to forests within each sequence. We then compared the recovery rates to these events with pollen richness before the event. We also compared recovery rates of each site with a measure of present resilience in the region as demonstrated by measuring global vegetation persistence to climatic perturbations using satellite imagery. Preliminary results indeed show a positive relationship between pre-disturbance taxonomic richness and faster recovery rates. However, there is less evidence to support the concept that resilience is intrinsic to a region; patterns of resilience apparent in ecosystems presently are not necessarily conservative through time."


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