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3 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Adams, Aaron J
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1.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Connectivity mediated by seasonal bonefish (Albula vulpes) migration between the Caribbean Sea and a tropical estuary of Belize and Mexico
Pérez Cobb, Addiel Ubandes (autor) ; Schmitter Soto, Juan Jacobo (autor) ; Adams, Aaron J. (autor) ; Heyman, William D. (autor) ;
Contenido en: Environmental Biology of Fishes Vol. 102, no. 2 (February 2019), p. 197-207 ISSN: 0378-1909
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Bonefish (Albula vulpes) are an important resource for catch-and-release fishing in the Caribbean Sea. Understanding movements within and between the Caribbean Coast (CC) and Chetumal-Corozal Bay (CB) in Mexico and Belize is crucial for identifying and protecting home ranges, migration routes, pre-spawning and spawning sites. We used a mixed-methods approach to document dynamics of bonefish movement. We collected fishers’ local knowledge (LK) using qualitative methods including workshops, key informant interviews, participant observation and field notes about bonefish seasonal movements. We then used mark-recapture (8816 tagged, 569 recaptured) method to understand bonefish movements by size, location and season. Bonefish were significantly larger in CC than in CB. We documented several seasonal movement patterns. A southward movement within CB during the rainy season was likely driven by salinity changes. This was followed by an eastward long-distance migration during the norths or cold front season between the bay and the Caribbean Sea, likely for spawning, as we document likely spawning readiness, pre-spawning behavior and synchronized to the fore-reef at one of two pre-spawning aggregation sites in a World Heritage Site in the CC of Belize during November and December of 2018. There was then a northward movement during the dry season as a journey back to home ranges. The information presented herein can inform resource management and protected areas planning towards a bi-national conservation and management of bonefish and its habitats.


2.
Artículo
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Influence of environmental variables on abundance and movement of bonefish (Albula vulpes) in the Caribbean Sea and a tropical estuary of Belize and Mexico
Pérez Cobb, Addiel Ubandes (autor) ; Schmitter Soto, Juan Jacobo (autor) ; Adams, Aaron J. (autor) ; Herrera Pavón, Roberto Luis (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Environmental Biology of Fishes Volumen 102 (2019), p. 1421–1434 ISSN: 1573-5133
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Bonefish (Albula vulpes) is a socioeconomically important species that supports a data-poor recreational fishery in developing countries. Understanding how environmental variables influence its abundance and movement is important for better decision-making.This study used mark-recapture to examine the association between abiotic (temperature, salinity, wind speed, tides moon phase, and sediment coarseness) and biotic (presence of predators and bottom vegetation) variables with bonefish movement and abundance in Corozal-Chetumal bay and the adjacent Caribbean coast of southern Mexico and northern Belize. We used seinesto capture bonefish, marked 9657 using dart tags and recaptured 595 fish (6.2% recapture rate) during 16 sample periods between January 2016 and February 2018. Marked bonefish size ranged 19.5–56.4 cm and recaptured 23.9–49.4 cm. Total abundance for each seine sample and distance between mark and recapture locations were used in two separate multiple stepwise regression analyses. Movement was negatively associated with temperature and predator presence, while sediment coarseness and moon phase were positively associated. Temperature increases were associated withshort-distance movements. Temperature decreases and high-illumination lunar phases were associated with longer-distance movement and likely related to spawning migrations. Presence of predators, like barracuda, was associated with low bonefish abundances and was likely an adaptive response to form multiple schools of low density by bonefish to avoid predation. These spatiotemporal movement and abundance patterns are recommended to be taken into account in fisheries and protected areas management and to inform the decision-making process in urban and tourism development in coastal habitats.


3.
Artículo
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Overall patterns of distribution and abundance of Albula spp. leptocephali larvae offshore in the western Caribbean Sea (CAS) and Gulf of Mexico (GOM), and in coastal waters of the Mexican Caribbean (MXC) were analyzed from: (a) cruise data available from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (CAS, GOM) and (b) coastal plankton surveys (1998–2002 and January 2004) (MXC). We found striking inshore-offshore differences in the larval catch and size structure. Offshore cruises yielded 57 leptocephali, mostly determined as early stage I (18.0 ± 8.2 mm SL, mean ± SD). In contrast, coastal samples yielded 2,466 larvae 51.4 ± 3.6 mm SL, mostly late stage I; of these, 2,345 (95%) were caught over 4 nights in January 2004. The relationship between the larval length (mm, SL) and the distance to the coastline (km) was best represented by the regression model LENGTHij ¼ 51:44 0:235 DISTANCEij þ eij with a distinct variance for each locality. To ascertain whether the coastal inflow of leptocephali follows a regular seasonal pattern or depends on episodic events will require further monitoring; available evidence suggests that the southern coast of the MXC offers favorable conditions for the recruitment of Albula spp. larvae