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4 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Hernández Gómez, Irving Uriel
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1.
Artículo
Mapping disturbance from selective logging in tropical forests of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
Hernández Gómez, Irving Uriel (autor) ; Vázquez Luna, Dinora (autora) ; Cerdán Cabrera, Carlos Roberto (autor) ; Navarro Martínez, María Angélica (autora) ; Ellis, Edward Alan (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Tropical and Subtropical Agroecosystems Volumen 23, número 1 (2020), páginas 143-152 ISSN: 1870-0462
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Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

El mapeo de los impactos de la tala selectiva en la Península de Yucatán es importante para lograr la reducción de las emisiones de carbono y los objetivos de conservación de la biodiversidad. Objetivo. Evaluar la efectividad de la aplicación de técnicas de teledetección mediante el uso de imágenes LANDSAT 8 OLI para detectar la perturbación del bosque tropical a partir de la extracción de madera en cuatro bosques con manejo comunitario (ejidos). Además, evaluamos las diferencias entre ellos en términos de implementación de manejo forestal mejorado (IFM) y prácticas de aprovechamiento de impacto reducido (RIL). Metodología. Se calcularon los índices de vegetación y se realizó la clasificación de la cubierta forestal para hacer un mapa de las zonas taladas y no taladas y las perturbaciones específicas del aprovechamiento (por ejemplo, claros por la tala de árboles, carriles de arrastre, caminos forestales y áreas de acopio de madera) en las áreas de corta anual de 2014. Las evaluaciones de precisión se realizaron en función de los puntos de validación colectados en el campo después del aprovechamiento. Resultados. Encontramos que el 75% de las clasificaciones binarias (áreas impactadas y no impactadas) tenían precisiones globales medias superiores al 60%, lo que representa una precisión aceptable (40 a 70%), aunque el mapeo de las perturbaciones específicas de la cosecha tuvo poca precisión (<40%). Los índices de vegetación que obtuvieron los mejores resultados fueron el índice de vegetación de diferencia normalizada (NDVI), Tasseled Cap Greenness y Tasseled Cap Wetness. Los ejidos que aplicaron IFM y RIL impactaron un porcentaje menor de sus áreas de corta y menos área de bosque por metro cúbico de madera extraída, a pesar de intensidades de tala similares o mayores que los ejidos sin prácticas mejoradas.

Implicaciones. El monitoreo del impacto por la tala selectiva es importante para mejorar el manejo forestal y la certificación de sostenibilidad. Conclusiones. El mapeo y el monitoreo de los impactos de la tala selectiva por gestores y técnicos forestales se puede realizar de manera costo-efectiva utilizando imágenes LANDSAT 8, aunque la precisión se puede mejorar con imágenes de alta resolución.

Resumen en inglés

Background. Mapping selective logging impacts on the Yucatan Peninsula is important to pursuing carbon emissions reduction and biodiversity conservation goals. Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of applying remote sensing techniques using LANDSAT 8 OLI imagery to detect tropical forest disturbance from timber harvesting in four communally managed forests (ejidos). We further assess differences among them in terms of implementing improved forest management (IFM) and reduced impact logging (RIL). Methodology. Vegetation indices were calculated, and forest cover classification was performed to map logged and unlogged forest and specific harvest disturbances (e.g. felling gaps, skid trails, logging roads and log landings) in annual cutting areas of 2014. Accuracy assessments were conducted based on validation points collected in the field after logging. Results. We found that 75% of the binary classifications (logged and unlogged forest) had mean overall accuracies greater than 60%, representing a fair (40 to 70%) accuracy, although mapping of specific harvesting disturbances had poor accuracy (<40%). Vegetation indices that performed the best were normalized vegetation index (NDVI), Tasseled Cap Greenness and Tasseled Cap Wetness. Ejidos that applied IFM and RIL impacted a smaller percentage of their cutting areas and less area of forest per cubic meter of timber extracted, despite similar or higher logging intensities than ejidos without improved practices. Implication. Monitoring selective logging disturbance is important to improved forest management and certification of sustainability. Conclusion. Mapping and monitoring impacts from selective logging by forest managers and technicians can be performed in a cost-efficient manner using LANDSAT 8 images, although accuracy could be improved with higher resolution imagery.


2.
Artículo
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Detecting and monitoring forest disturbance from selective logging is necessary to develop effective strategies and polices that conserve tropical forests and mitigate climate change. We assessed the potential of using the remote sensing tool, CLASlite forest monitoring system, to detect disturbance from timber harvesting in four community forests (ejidos) of the Selva Maya on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Selective logging impacts (e.g. felling gaps, skid trails, logging roads and log landings) were mapped using GPS in the 2014 annual cutting areas (ACAs) of each ejido. We processed and analyzed two pre-harvest Landsat images (2001 and 2013) and one post-harvest image (November 2014) with the CLASlite system, producing maps of degraded, deforested and unlogged areas in each ACA. Based on reference points of disturbed (felling and skidding), deforested (log landings and roads) and unlogged areas in each ACA, we applied accuracy assessments which showed very low overall accuracies (<19.1%). Selective logging impacts, mainly from log landings and new logging road construction, were detected in only one ejido which had the highest logging intensity (7 m³ ha–¹).


3.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Distribution and Abundance of Big-Leaf Mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
Navarro Martínez, María Angélica (autora) ; Ellis, Edward Alan (autor) ; Hernández Gómez, Irving Uriel (autor) ; Romero Montero, José Arturo (autor) ; Sánchez Sánchez, Odilón Manuel (autor) ;
Contenido en: Tropical Conservation Science Vol. 11 (2018), p. 1–17 ISSN: 1940-0829
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King) is an economically important timber species in the Neotropics. For over three centuries, it has been selectively extracted from tropical forests, threatening its populations. We investigate the actual and potential distribution of big-leaf mahogany and assess its abundance on the Yucatan Peninsula based on the National Forest and Soils Inventory database. Furthermore, we evaluate environmental factors associated with its distribution, abundance, and tree size. The actual and potential distribution models show the presence of mahogany in a wide geographic area covering the southern and eastern portions of the Yucatan Peninsula. Abundance of mahogany in the landscape varies and in general is low. The spatial potential distribution model was best explained by the environmental variables of vegetation cover (medium- and high-stature semievergreen tropical forest) and elevation (upland areas). Results also indicate that mahogany remains relatively abundant and contain larger size classes in localities where the species has been harvested and managed for decades under community forest management. Furthermore, statistical analyses show greater tree density of mahogany mostly associated with low-stature semievergreen tropical forest having deep soils (gleysols and vertisols), while larger tree size (diameter at breast height) was associated with medium-stature semievergreen tropical forests in upland areas with moderately deep or shallow soils (mostly rendzinas or leptosols). Despite deforestation, land-use change and forestry activities on the Yucatan Peninsula, particularly in the past 20 years, the distribution and abundance of mahogany do not appear to be as drastically reduced as described in other neotropical regions.


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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Natural forest management in the tropics is often impeded by scarcity of advanced regeneration of commercial species. To supplement natural regeneration in a forest managed by a community in the Selva Maya of Mexico, nursery-grown Swietenia macrophylla seedlings were planted in multiple-tree felling gaps, known as bosquetes. Remnant trees are often left standing in gaps for cultural and economic reasons or due to their official protected status. We focus on these purposefully retained trees and their impacts on planted seedlings. Sampled bosquetes were 400–1800 m², of which remnant trees covered a mean of 29%. Seedling height growth rates over the first 18 months after out-planting more than doubled with increased canopy openness from 0.09 m year-¹ under medium cover to 0.22 m year-¹ in full sun. Liana infestations and shoot tip damage were most frequent on seedlings in the open, but, contrary to our expectations, height growth rates were 0.14 m year-¹ faster for liana-infested seedlings than non-infested and did not differ between damaged and undamaged seedlings. Apparently the more rapid height growth of well-illuminated seedlings more than compensated for the effects of lianas or shoot tip damage. Despite the abundance of remnant trees and their negative effects on seedling growth, enrichment planting in bosquetes has potential for community-based natural forest management in the tropics in supplementing natural regeneration of commercial species. One obvious recommendation is to leave fewer remnant trees, especially those of commercial species that are non-merchantable due to stem defects and trees retained for no apparent reason, which together constituted half of the remnant crown cover in the sampled bosquetes. Finally, given the rapid growth of lianas and understory palms in large canopy gaps, at least the most vigorous of the planted seedlings should be tended for at least two years.