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2 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Nguyen, An
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Artículo
Pangolins in global camera trap data: implications for ecological monitoring
Khwaja, Hannah (autora) ; Buchan, Claire (autora) ; Wearn, Oliver R. (autor) ; Bahaa el din, Laila (autora) ; Bantlin, Drew (autor) ; Bernard, Henry (autor) ; Bitariho, Robert (autor) ; Van der Weyde, Leanne K. (autora) ; Bohm, Torsten (autor) ; Borah, Jimmy (autor) ; Brodie, Jedediah (autor) ; Chutipong, Wanlop (autor) ; Preez, Byron du (autor) ; Ebang Mbele, Alex (autor) ; Edwards, Sarah (autora) ; Fairet, Emilie (autora) ; Frechette, Jackson L. (autor) ; Garside, Adrian (autor) ; Gibson, Luke (autor) ; Giordano, Anthony (autor) ; Veeraswami Gopi, Govindan (autor) ; Granados, Alys (autora) ; Gubbi, Sanjay (autor) ; Harich, Franziska (autora) ; Haurez, Barbara (autora) ; Havmøller, Rasmus W. (autor) ; Helmy, Olga (autora) ; Isbell, Lynne A. (autora) ; Jenks, Kate (autora) ; Kalle, Riddhika (autora) ; Kamjing, Anucha (autor) ; Khamcha, Daphawan (autora) ; Kiebou Opepa, Cisquet (autor) ; Kinnaird, Margaret (autora) ; Kruger, Caroline (autora) ; Laudisoit, Anne (autora) ; Lynam, Antony (autor) ; Macdonald, Suzanne E. (autora) ; Mathai, John (autor) ; Metsio Sienne, Julia (autora) ; Meier, Amelia (autora) ; Mills, David (autor) ; Mohd Azlan, Jayasilan (autor) ; Nakashima, Yoshihiro (autor) ; Nash, Helen C. (autora) ; Ngoprasert, Dusit (autor) ; Nguyen, An (autora) ; O’Brien, Tim (autor) ; Olson, David (autor) ; Orbell, Christopher (autor) ; Poulsen, John (autor) ; Ramesh, Tharmalingam (autor) ; Reeder, DeeAnn (autora) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ; Rich, Lindsey N. (autora) ; Rode Margono, Johanna (autora) ; Rovero, Francesco (autor) ; Sheil, Douglas (autor) ; Shirley, Matthew H. (autor) ; Stratford, Ken (autor) ; Sukumal, Niti (autor) ; Suwanrat, Saranphat (autora) ; Tantipisanuh, Naruemon (autora) ; Tilker, Andrew (autor) ; Van Berkel, Tim (autor) ; Van der Weyde, Leanne K. (autora) ; Varney, Matthew (autor) ; Weise, Florian (autora) ; Wiesel, Ingrid (autora) ; Wilting, Andreas (autora) ; Wong, Seth T. (autor) ; Waterman, Carly (autora) ; Challender, Daniel W. S. (autor) ;
Contenido en: Global Ecology and Conservation Vol. 20, e00769 (2019), p. 1-14 ISSN: 2351-9894
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Despite being heavily exploited, pangolins (Pholidota: Manidae) have been subject tolimited research, resulting in a lack of reliable population estimates and standardised survey methods for the eight extant species. Camera trapping represents a unique opportunity for broad-scale collaborative species monitoring due to its largely nondiscriminatory nature, which creates considerable volumes of data on a relatively widerange of species. This has the potential to shed light on the ecology of rare, cryptic and understudied taxa, with implications for conservation decision-making. We undertook aglobal analysis of available pangolin data from camera trapping studies across their rangein Africa and Asia. Our aims were (1) to assess the utility of existing camera trapping efforts as a method for monitoring pangolin populations, and (2) to gain insights into the distribution and ecology of pangolins. We analysed data collated from 103 camera trap surveys undertaken across 22 countries that fell within the range of seven of the eight pangolin species, which yielded more than half a million trap nights and 888 pangolin encounters. We ran occupancy analyses on three species (Sunda pangolin Manis javanica, white-bellied pangolin Phataginus tricuspisand giant pangolin Smutsia gigantea).

Detection probabilities varied with forest cover and levels of human influence for P. tricuspis, but were low (<0.05) for all species. Occupancy was associated with distance from rivers for M. javanica and S. gigantea, elevation for P. tricuspis and S. gigantea, forest cover forP. tricuspisand protected area status for M. javanica and P. tricuspis. We conclude that camera traps are suitable for the detection of pangolins and large-scale assessment of their distributions. However, the trapping effort required to monitor populations at any given study site using existing methods appears prohibitively high. This may change in the future should anticipated technological and methodological advances in camera trapping facilitate greater sampling efforts and/or higher probabilities of detection. In particular, targeted camera placement for pangolins is likely to make pangolin monitoring more feasible with moderate sampling efforts.


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Biodiversity loss is one major outcome of human-mediated ecosystem disturbance. One way that humans have triggered wildlife declines is by transporting disease-causing agents to remote areas of the world. Amphibians have been hit particularly hard by disease due in part to a globally distributed pathogenic chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis [Bd]). Prior research has revealed important insights into the biology and distribution of Bd; however, there are still many outstanding questions in this system. Although we know that there are multiple divergent lineages of Bd that differ in pathogenicity, we know little about how these lineages are distributed around the world and where lineages may be coming into contact. Here, we implement a custom genotyping method for a global set of Bd samples. This method is optimized to amplify and sequence degraded DNA from noninvasive skin swab samples. We describe a divergent lineage of Bd, which we call BdASIA3, that appears to be widespread in Southeast Asia. This lineage co-occurs with the global panzootic lineage (BdGPL) in multiple localities. Additionally, we shed light on the global distribution of BdGPL and highlight the expanded range of another lineage, BdCAPE. Finally, we argue that more monitoring needs to take place where Bd lineages are coming into contact and where we know little about Bd lineage diversity. Monitoring need not use expensive or difficult field techniques but can use archived swab samples to further explore the history—and predict the future impacts—of this devastating pathogen.