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5 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Papadopoulos, Nikos T.
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2.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Cost of reproduction in male medflies: the primacy of sexual courting in extreme longevity reduction
Papadopoulos, Nikos T. (autor) ; Liedo Fernández, Pablo (autor) ; Müller, Hans Georg (autor) ; Wang, Jane Ling (autor) ; Molleman, Freerk (autor) ; Carey, James R. (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Journal of Insect Physiology Vol. 56, no. 3 (March 2010), p. 283-287 ISSN: 0022-1910
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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In polygynous insect species, male reproductive success is directly related to lifetime mating success. However, the costs for males of sexual activities such as courting, signaling, and mating are largely unknown. We studied the cost of sexual activities in male Mediterranean fruit flies, Ceratitis capitata (Tephritidae), a polygynous lekking species, by keeping cohorts of individual male flies under relaxed crowding conditions in the laboratory. We used 5 cohorts among which individuals differed in their opportunities to interact with con-specifics and recorded life span, and in one treatment, mating rate. We found that males kept singly lived more than twice as long as males that interacted intensively with mature virgin females, while male–male interactions caused a smaller reduction in longevity. Because longevity of males that could court but not mate was not significantly different from those that could court and mate, we conclude that courting (not mating) was responsible for the observed longevity reduction. Moreover, we detected high variability in male mating success, when 5 virgin females were offered daily. In contrast to the cohort level, individual males that mated at a high rate lived relatively long, thus indicating heterogeneity in quality or sexual strategy among males.


3.
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Virgin females compete for mates in the male lekking species Ceratitis capitata
Papadopoulos, Nikos T. (autor) ; Carey, James R. (autor) ; Liedo Fernández, Pablo (autor) ; Müller, Hans Georg (autor) ; Sentürk, Damla (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Physiological Entomology Vol. 34, no. 3 (Apr. 2009), p. 238–245 ISSN: 0307-6962
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Aggressive behaviour occurring in intrasexual competition is an important trait for animal fitness. Although female intrasexual aggression is reported in several insect species, little is known about female competition and aggressive interactions in polygynous male lekking species. The interactions of female Mediterranean fruit flies, Ceratitis capitata (a male lekking species), with other females and mating pairs under laboratory conditions are investigated. Mature, unmated (virgin) females are aggressive against each other and against mating pairs, whereas immature females are not. Female aggression against other females decreases dramatically after mating; however, mated females maintain aggression against mating pairs. In addition, higher intrasexual aggression rates are observed for mature, virgin females than for virgin males of the same age. The results show that female aggressiveness is virginity related, suggesting female competition for mates. These findings have important implications for understanding the physiological aspects of a complex social behaviour such as aggression and should stimulate further research on female agonistic behaviour in male lekking mating systems.


4.
Artículo
Age structure changes and extraordinary lifespan in wild medfly populations
Carey, James R. (autor) ; Papadopoulos, Nikos T. (autor) ; Müller, Hans Georg (autor) ; Katsoyannos, Byron I. (autor) ; Kouloussis, Nikos A. (autor) ; Liedo Fernández, Pablo (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Aging Cell Vol. 7, no. 3 (June 2008), p. 426–437 ISSN: 1474-9728
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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The main purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that major changes in age structure occur in wild populations of the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) and that a substantial fraction of individuals survive to middle age and beyond (> 3–4 weeks). We thus brought reference life tables and deconvolution models to bear on medfly mortality data gathered from a 3-year study of field-captured individuals that were monitored in the laboratory. The average timeto- death of captured females differed between sampling dates by 23.9, 22.7, and 37.0 days in the 2003, 2004, and 2005 field seasons, respectively. These shifts in average times-to-death provided evidence of changes in population age structure. Estimates indicated that middle-aged medflies (> 30 days) were common in the population. A surprise in the study was the extraordinary longevity observed in field-captured medflies.

For example, 19 captured females but no reference females survived in the laboratory for 140 days or more, and 6 captured but no reference males survived in the laboratory for 170 days or more. This paper advances the study of aging in the wild by introducing a new method for estimating age structure in insect populations, demonstrating that major changes in age structure occur in field populations of insects, showing that middle-aged individuals are common in the wild, and revealing the extraordinary lifespans of wild-caught individuals due to their early life experience in the field.


5.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Trends in lipid and protein contents during medfly aging: an harmonic path to death
Nestel, David ; Papadopoulos, Nikos T. (coaut.) ; Liedo Fernández, Pablo (coaut.) ; Gonzales Ceron, Lilia (coaut.) ;
Clasificación: AR/632.774097275 / T7
Contenido en: Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology Vol. 60, no. 3 (November 2005), p. 130–139 ISSN: 1520-6327
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Survival and egg-laying trends were investigated in Mediterranean fruit flies (Ceratitis capitata) adults maintained on a sucrose-only diet, or on a full diet that consisted of a 3:1 sucrose and yeast hydrolizate mixture. In addition, we followed the total individual lipid and protein contents of aging flies in a cohort. Survival trends and life expectancy parameters at eclosion for males and females on full diet and for males on sucrose only were very similar. In contrast, the mortality of females on sucrose only was high early in life, but then slowed down. Egg-laying was ten times greater in female flies on full diet than in flies on sucrose only. Lipid contents in males and females on both types of diets were very similar, and harmonically oscillated with an amplitude of approximately 10 days. Successive crests of lipids tended to be smaller with the ageing of the cohort, and lipids contents significantly dropped at very advanced ages and close to the maximal age of the whole cohort. Protein contents of flies maintained on a full diet were high and stayed at a constant level throughout the entire life of the cohort. Protein levels in males and females on sucrose only dropped drastically during the first days of adult life, but then stayed stable at a low level until advanced ages. We propose that the synchronous rhythmic oscillation in lipid contents of male and female flies seems to be independently set by an internal clock. Protein reserves are allocated according to the access to protein food sources and these levels of protein are closely associated to egg production and mortality. Our results are discussed in view of resource allocation during reproduction and senescence.