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1 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Semotiuk, Andrew J.
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Pillar of strength: columnar cactus as a key factor in Yoreme heritage and wildland preservation
Semotiuk, Andrew J. (coaut.) ; Colunga García Marín, Silvia Patricia (coaut.) ; Valenzuela Maldonado, David (coaut.) ; Ezcurra Real de Azua, Exequiel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ambio. A Journal of the Human Environment Vol. 47, no. 1 (February 2018), p. 86–96 ISSN: 0044-7447
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The persistence of traditional cultures and modes of land use within rapidly changing, globalized societies is a central issue in understanding ecological and cultural change in the Anthropocene. Located in the heart of the Green Revolution, the Yoreme (Mayo) people of the Mayo Valley in Mexico still obtain a significant proportion of their sustenance from wild ecosystems in the midst of this intensive technological and agricultural development. They live in and around the thornscrub dominated by pitaya (Stenocereus thurberi (Engelm.) Buxb.). In this study, we hypothesize that pitaya supports Yoreme heritage and sustenance amidst anthropogenic changes to the landscape, and we asked three specific questions: What is the land-use status of the S. thurberi habitat? What are its potential uses? Does S. thurberi provide economic value? To address these questions, we conducted interviews, vegetation surveys, and land-use analysis based on geographic information systems. We found that (a) land conversion of the pitaya-rich thornscrub is occurring at a precipitous rate, (b) local producers preserve and adapt their traditions, and (c) S. thurberi supports Yoreme heritage while providing economic benefit. The resulting land-use projections along with the cultural value of pitaya products shows the importance of conserving land and promoting sustainable projects instead of clearing land for other uses. If habitat shrinking continues at the current rate, it is likely that both Yoreme livelihoods and continued cultural practices will suffer.