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23 resultados encontrados para: TEMA: Tephritidae
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2.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

BACKGROUND: The field activity of the mixtures of liquid baits and insecticides used in the control of tephritid pests is normally short, both when they are sprayed or when used in trapping or in attract-and-kill devices. A new lure-and-kill device based on Torricelli’s barometer principle was tested as a long-lasting dispenser for two liquid hydrolysed protein baits mixed with insecticide, GF-120 and Captor 300+malathion, against Anastrepha ludens (Loew) flies of laboratory origin. The dispensers were kept under field conditions for 42 days. Laboratory bioassays for insecticide properties and field cage studies for attraction capacity were carried out on a weekly basis after 22 and 42 days of weathering respectively. RESULTS: Our results demonstrated that both mixtures of insecticides and phagostimulant baits killed up to 80% of the tested flies when they were 42 days old. The attraction capacity of both weathering-exposed mixtures was even higher than fresh insecticidal–bait mixtures after the same period. CONCLUSION: The device is efficient when used with the liquid baits currently employed in the control of tephritid flies. It also offers a high potential for combining visual stimuli, such as shape and colour, and for improving trapping and bait station designs. Incorporating this newdevice in trapping and attract-and-kill methods could help to reduce the frequency of servicing of the traps and bait stations and lower their costs.


3.
Libro
Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Tephritid fruit flies are among the world’s most notorious pests of commercially important fruits and vegetables, and with ever-increasing human and product movement and accelerated global warming, these flies will have an even greater impact in the future. Information gathered through trapping is crucial to understanding their ecology, controlling their populations, and developing international trade agreements. This volume is the first devoted exclusively to trapping tephritid fruit flies and adopts a comprehensive and global approach in describing key empirical and theoretical issues. The book consists of four major sections, which cover lures and traps, ecology and detection, attract-and-kill methods of control, and phytosanitary programs and regulations. Within this broad perspective, the authors focus on a diverse array of basic and applied topics, including the role of pheromones, food-baits, and plant odors as trap lures, dispersion and invasion biology, modeling detection programs, evaluation of bait stations, mass trapping, and male annihilation as control measures, and the role of trapping data in developing trade regulations. Representing 15 countries, the authors bring rich experience to the subject and ably describe current status as well as historical perspective and future direction of the selected topics. Useful manuals exist, but this book offers a much broader, academic, and international perspective to the core principles of tephritid trapping. The book’s audience will include researchers, teachers, animal and plant health administrators, and policy makers. Given the breadth of material covered and the exhaustive citation listing along with the increasing agricultural threat posed by tephritid fruit flies, this book will be an extremely valuable reference on the subject for many years to come.

Índice

Part I Introduction
1 Fruit Fly Alphabets
Part II Lures and Traps
2 Pheromones, Male Lures, and Trapping of Tephritid Fruit Flies
3 History and Development of Food-Based Attractants
4 Plant Odors as Fruit Fly Attractants
5 Interactions Between Tephritid Fruit Fly Physiological State and Stimuli from Baits and Traps: Looking for the Pied Piper of Hamelin to Lure Pestiferous Fruit Flies
Part III Ecology and Detection
6 Trapping to Monitor Tephritid Movement: Results, Best Practice, and Assessment of Alternatives
7 Fruit Fly Invasion: Historical, Biological, Economic Aspects and Management
8 Fruit Fly Detection Programs: The Potentials and Limitations of Trap Arrays
9 Spatial Analysis of Tephritid Fruit Fly Traps
10 Using Molecules to Identify the Source of Fruit Fly Invasions
11 Modeling Trapping of Fruit Flies for Detection, Suppression, or Eradication
12 Priorities in Formulation and Activity of Adulticidal Insecticide Bait Sprays for Fruit Flies
13 Recent Developments and Applications of Bait Stations for Integrated Pest Management of Tephritid Fruit Flies
14 Male Annihilation, Past, Present, and Future
15 Mass Trapping for Fruit Fly Control
Part V Phytosanitary Programs and Regulations
16 Integrating Tephritid Trapping into Phytosanitary Programs
17 Trapping Related to Phytosanitary Status and Trade
Part VI Coda 18 The Complexities of Knowing What It Is You Are Trapping
Index


4.
Capítulo de libro - Memoria en extenso sin arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Parámetros de producción y calidad durante la renovación de la colonia de Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera, Tephritidae) en proceso de cría masiva
Bravo López, Bigail ; Hernández Ortiz, Emilio (coaut.) ; Artiaga López, Trinidad (coaut.) ; Salvador Figueroa, Miguel (coaut.) ; Flores Breceda, Salvador (coaut.) ; Toledo, Jorge (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Entomología mexicana, 2009 Texcoco, Estado de México, México : Sociedad Mexicana de Entomología : Colegio de Postgraduados, 2009 Vol. 8, p. 378-383 ISBN:968-8395-59-2
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
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5.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Stochastic dietary restriction using a Markov-chain feeding protocol elicits complex, life history response in medflies
Carey, James R. (autor) ; Liedo Fernández, Pablo (autor) ; Müller, Hans Georg (autor) ; Wang, Jane Ling (autor) ; Zhang, Ying (autor) ; Harshman, Lawrence (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Aging Cell Vol. 4, no. 1 (February 2005), p. 31–39 ISSN: 1474-9728
PDF PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Lifespan in individually housed medflies (virgins of both sexes) and daily reproduction for females were studied following one of 12 dietary restriction (DR) treatments in which the availability of high-quality food (yeast–sugar mixture) for each fly was based on a Markov chain feeding scheme – a stochastic dietary regime which specifies that the future dietary state depends only on the present dietary state and not on the path by which the present state was achieved. The stochastic treatments consisted of a combination of one of four values of a ‘discovery’ parameter and one of three values of a ‘persistence’ parameter. The results supported the hypotheses that: (i) longevity is extended in most medfly cohorts subject to stochastic DR; and (ii) longevity is more affected by the patch discovery than the patch persistence parameter. One of the main conclusions of the study is that, in combination with the results of earlier dietary restriction studies on the medfly, the results reinforce the concept that the details of the dietary restriction protocols have a profound impact on the sign and magnitude of the longevity extension relative to ad libitum cohorts and that a deeper understanding of the effect of food restriction on longevity is not possible without an understanding of its effect on reproduction.


6.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Attraction of mexican fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) to grapefruit: enhancement by mechanical wounding of and experience with grapefruit
Robacker, David C. ; Fraser, Ivich (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Insect Behavior :: Vol. 15 no. 3 (May 2002), p. 399-413 ISSN: 0892-7553
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
33438-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Wild strain, mated, female Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), with no prior experience with fruit (naive), were not attracted to grapefruit, a preferred cultivated host, in wind tunnel experiments. Naive, mated laboratory strain females were attracted. Prior experience with grapefruit increased attraction of both laboratory and wild strains. More females were attracted to fruit with peel damage than to undamaged fruit, indicating that fruit odor mediated attraction. More naive than experienced females attempted to oviposit on the sides of the wind tunnel. Experienced laboratory males, but not wild males or naive males, were attracted to grapefruit. Attraction and oviposition behavior of laboratory flies was greater than that of wild flies.


7.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Do mexican fruit flies (diptera: tephritidae) prefer graperfruit to yellow chapote, a native host?
Robacker, David C. ; Fraser, Ivich (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Florida Entomologist Vol. 85, no. 3 (September 2002), p 481-487
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
33440-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
PDF
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Las hembras apareadas de raza silvestre de la mosca mexicana de las frutas, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), con no experiencia anterior con frutas (ingenuas), no fueron atraidas a y no trataron ovopositar más en la fruta de chapote amarillo (Sargentia greggii) que en toronjas (Citrus paradisi) en experimentos de túnel de viento. Las hembras ingenuas de la raza apareada en el laboratorio preferieron las toronjas. La experiencia anterior con chapote aumentó la atracción de la raza del laboratorio y de la raza silvestre hacia el chapote. Más hembras ingenuas que hembras con experiencia con chapote de ambas razas trataron a ovopositar en los lados del túnel de viento. Los machos ingenuos de la raza del laboratorio fueron atraidos más hacia las toronjas que al chapote. Los machos ingenuos silvestres y los machos con experiencia con chapote de la raza silvestre y del laboratorio no preferieron cualquiera de las frutas.

Resumen en inglés

Wild strain, mated, female Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), with no prior experience with fruit (naïve), were not attracted to and did not attempt oviposition in yellow chapote ( Sargentia greggii ) fruit more so than grapefruit ( Citrus paradisi ) in wind tunnel experiments. Naïve, mated laboratory strain females preferred grapefruit. Prior experience with chapote increased attraction of both laboratory and wild strains to chapote. More naïve than chapote-experienced females of both strains attempted to oviposit on the sides of the wind tunnel. Naïve laboratory strain males were more attracted to grapefruit than chapote. Naïve wild males and chapote-experienced wild and laboratory males did not prefer either fruit.


8.
Libro
Fruit flies (tephritidae): phylogeny and evolution of behavior / edited by Martín Aluja, Allen L. Norrbom
Aluja Schuneman, Martín (ed.) (1957-) ; Norrbom, Allen L. (coed.) ;
Boca Raton, Florida : CRC , 2001
Clasificación: 632.774 / F78/2001
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
SAA007851 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

9.
Libro
XIV curso internacional sobre moscas de la fruta
Curso Internacional sobre Moscas de la Fruta (14 : 2001 : Metapa de Domínguez, Chiapas) ;
Metapa de Domínguez, Chiapas, México : Centro Internacional de Capacitación en Moscas de la Fruta , 2001
Clasificación: 632.774 / C8/2001
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020006675 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

10.
Libro
Fruit flies (tephritidae): phylogeny and evolution of behavior / edited by Martín Aluja, Allen L. Norrbom
Aluja Schuneman, Martín (ed.) (1957-) ; Norrbom, Allen L. (coed.) ;
Boca Raton, Florida : CRC , 2000
Clasificación: 632.774 / F78
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020005614 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1