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441 resultados encontrados para: TEMA: Industrialización
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1.
Libro
Investing in biological diversity: U. S. research and conservation efforts in developing countries / Janet N. Abramovitz
Abramovitz, Janet N. ;
Washington : World Resources Institute , 1991
Clasificación: F/333.9516 / A2
Bibliotecas: Chetumal , San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030005341 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
SAF002025 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

2.
Libro
A survey of U. S.: based efforts to research and conserve biological diversity in developing countries / Janet N. Abramovitz
Abramovitz, Janet N. (autora) ;
Washington, District of Columbia, United States : World Resources Institute , 1989
Clasificación: F/333.9516 / A27
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
SAF001872 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

3.
Libro
Why nations fail: the origins of power, prosperity, and poverty / Daron Acemoglu, James A. Robinson
Acemoglu, Daron (autor) ; Robinson, James A. (autor) ;
New York, New York, United States : Currency Publishing , c2012
Clasificación: 330.901 / A2
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
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SIBE Tapachula
ECO020013902 (Disponible) , ECO020013866 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Brilliant and engagingly written, Why Nations Fail answers the question that has stumped the experts for centuries: Why are some nations rich and others poor, divided by wealth and poverty, health and sickness, food and famine? Is it culture, the weather, geography? Perhaps ignorance of what the right policies are? Simply, no. None of these factors is either definitive or destiny. Otherwise, how to explain why Botswana has become one of the fastest growing countries in the world, while other African nations, such as Zimbabwe, the Congo, and Sierra Leone, are mired in poverty and violence? Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson conclusively show that it is man-made political and economic institutions that underlie economic success (or lack of it). Korea, to take just one of their fascinating examples, is a remarkably homogeneous nation, yet the people of North Korea are among the poorest on earth while their brothers and sisters in South Korea are among the richest. The south forged a society that created incentives, rewarded innovation, and allowed everyone to participate in economic opportunities. The economic success thus spurred was sustained because the government became accountable and responsive to citizens and the great mass of people. Sadly, the people of the north have endured decades of famine, political repression, and very different economic institutions--with no end in sight. The differences between the Koreas is due to the politics that created these completely different institutional trajectories.

Based on fifteen years of original research Acemoglu and Robinson marshall extraordinary historical evidence from the Roman Empire, the Mayan city-states, medieval Venice, the Soviet Union, Latin America, England, Europe, the United States, and Africa to build a new theory of political economy with great relevance for the big questions of today, including: - China has built an authoritarian growth machine. Will it continue to grow at such high speed and overwhelm the West? - Are America's best days behind it? Are we moving from a virtuous circle in which efforts by elites to aggrandize power are resisted to a vicious one that enriches and empowers a small minority? - What is the most effective way to help move billions of people from the rut of poverty to prosperity? More philanthropy from the wealthy nations of the West? Or learning the hard-won lessons of Acemoglu and Robinson's breakthrough ideas on the interplay between inclusive political and economic institutions? Why Nations Fail will change the way you look at--and understand--the world.


Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This sourcebook provides a consensus perspective from the global community of earth observation and carbon experts on methodological issues relating to quantifying the greenhouse gas (GHG) impacts of implementing mitigation activities related to the forest land use in developing countries (REDD+). At current status of negotiation five forestrelated activities have been listed to be implemented as mitigation actions by developing countries, namely: reducing emissions from deforestation (which implies a land-use change) and reducing emissions from forest degradation, conservation of forest carbon stocks, sustainable management of forest, Enhancement of forest carbon stocks (all relating to carbon stock changes and GHG emissions within managed forest land use). The UNFCCC negotiations and related country submissions on REDD+ have advocated that methodologies and tools become available for estimating emissions and removals from deforestation and forest land management with an acceptable level of certainty. Based on the current status of negotiations and UNFCCC approved methodologies, the Sourcebook aims to provide additional explanation, clarification, and methodologies to support REDD+ early actions and readiness mechanisms for building national REDD+ monitoring systems. It compliments the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories and it is aimed at being fully consistent with this IPCC Guidelines and with the UNFCCC reporting guidelines on annual inventories (FCCC/SBSTA/2006/9). The book emphasizes the role of satellite remote sensing as an important tool for monitoring changes in forest cover, provides guidance on how to obtain credible estimates of forest carbon stocks and related changes, and provides clarification on the use of IPCC Guidelines for estimating and reporting GHG emissions and removals from forest lands.

The sourcebook is the outcome of an ad-hoc REDD+ working group of “Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics” (GOFC-GOLD, www.fao.org/gtos/gofcgold/), a technical panel of the Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS). The working group has been active since the initiation of the UNFCCC REDD+ process in 2005, has organized REDD+ expert workshops, and has contributed to related UNFCCC/SBSTA side events and GTOS submissions. GOFC-GOLD provides an independent expert platform for international cooperation and communication to formulate scientific consensus and provide technical input to the discussions and for implementation activities. A number of international experts in remote sensing, carbon measurement and reporting under the UNFCCC have contributed to the development of this sourcebook. With political discussions and negotiations ongoing, the current document provides the starting point for defining an appropriate monitoring framework considering current technical capabilities to monitor gross GHG emissions from changes in forest cover by deforestation and forest land management. This sourcebook is a living document and further methods and technical details can be specified and added with evolving negotiations and science. Respective communities are invited to provide comments and feedback to evolve a more detailed and refined guidelines document in the future.

Índice

1 Introduction
1.1 Purpose and Scope of the Sourcebook
1.2 IPCC Context and Requirements
1.2.1 LULUCF in the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol
1.2.2 Definition of forests, deforestation and degradation
1.2.3 General method for estimating CO2 emissions and removals
1.2.4 Reference levels and benchmark forest area map
1.3 Clarifying REDD+ Elements Causing Forest Carbon Stock Change
1.4 Emerging Issues for REDD+ Implementation
1.5 Roadmap for the Sourcebook
2 Guidance on Methods
2.1 Monitoring Of Changes In Forest Area
2.1.1 Scope of chapter
2.1.2 Monitoring of changes of forest areas - deforestation and forestation
2.2 Monitoring of Change in Forest Land Remaining Forest Land
2.2.1 Direct approach to monitor selective logging
2.2.2 Indirect approach to monitor forest degradation
2.2.3 Key references for Section 2.2.
2.3 Estimation of Above Ground Carbon Stocks
2.3.1 Scope of chapter
2.3.2 Overview of carbon stocks, and issues related to C stocks
2.3.3 Which Tier should be used?
2.3.4 Stratification by carbon stocks
2.3.5 Estimation of carbon stocks of forests undergoing change
2.3.6 Estimation of soil carbon stocks
2.4 Methods for Estimating CO2 Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation
2.4.1 Scope of chapter
2.4.2 Linkage to 2006 IPCC Guidelines
2.4.3 Organization of chapter
2.4.4 Fundamental carbon estimating issues
2.4.5 Estimation of emissions from deforestation
2.4.6 Estimation of emissions from forest degradation
2.5 Methods for Estimating GHG Emissions from Biomass Burning
2.5.1 Scope of chapter
2.5.2 Introduction
2.5.3 IPCC guidelines for estimating fire-related emission
2.5.4 Mapping fire from space
2.5.5 Using existing products
2.5.6 Case studies
2.5.7 Key references for Section 2.5.
2.6 Estimation of Uncertainties
2.6.1 Scope of chapter
2.6.2 General concepts
2.6.3 Quantification of uncertainties

2.6.4 Key references for Section 2.6.
2.7 Methods to Address Emerging Issues for REDD+ Implementation
2.7.1 Identifying drivers of deforestation and degradation with remote sensing
2.7.2 Safeguards to ensure protection of biodiversity
2.7.3 Safeguards to ensure rights of forest dwellers
2.7.4 Monitoring displacement of emissions and permanence at a national scale
2.7.5 Linking national and sub-national monitoring
2.8 Guidance on Reporting
2.8.1 Scope of chapter
2.8.2 Overview of reporting principles and procedures
2.8.3 What are the major challenges for developing countries?
2.8.4 The conservativeness approach
2.8.5 Key references for chapter 2.8.
2.9 Status of Evolving Technologies
2.9.1 Scope of chapter
2.9.2 Role of LIDAR observations
2.9.3 Forest monitoring using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations
2.9.4 Integration of satellite and in situ data for biomass mapping
2.9.5 Targeted airborne surveys to support carbon stock estimations – a case study
2.9.6 Modeling and forecasting forest-cover change
2.9.7 Cloud-computing and web-based approaches to support national forest monitoring
2.9.8 Summary and recommendations
2.9.9 Key references for Section 2.9.
3 Practical Examples for Data Collection
3.1 Methods Used By Annex-1 Countries for National Lulucf Inventories
3.1.1 Scope of chapter
3.1.2 Methods for estimating forest area changes
3.1.3 Methods for estimating carbon stock changes
3.1.4 National carbon budget models
3.1.5 Estimation of uncertainties
3.1.6 Key References for section 3.1.
3.2 Overview of the Existing Forest Area Changes Monitoring Systems
3.2.1 Scope of chapter
3.2.2 National case studies
3.2.3 Key references for Section

3.3 From National Forest Inventory to National Forest GHG Inventories
3.3.1 Scope of chapter
3.3.2 Introduction on forest inventories in tropical countries
3.3.3 Indian national forest inventory (NFI)
3.3.4 GHG emissions in Mexico from land-use change and forestry
3.3.5 Key references for Section 3.3.
3.4 Community Forest Monitoring
3.4.1 Scope of chapter: rationale for community based inventories
3.4.2 How communities can make their own forest inventories
3.4.3 Additional data requirements
3.4.4 Reliability and accuracy
3.4.5 Costs
3.4.6 Options for independent assessment of locally collected data
3.4.7 Emerging information needs and technologies for locally collected data
4 Country Capacity Building
4.1 Scope of Chapter
4.2 Building National Carbon Monitoring Systems for REDD: Elements And Capacities
4.2.1 Key elements and required capacities - overview
4.2.2 Key elements and required capacities - GHG inventories
4.2.3 Key elements and required capacities - current monitoring capacities
4.3 Capacity Gaps and Cost Implications
4.3.1 Importance of monitoring for establishing a national REDD+ infrastructure
4.3.2 Planning and design
4.3.3 Institutional capacities
4.3.4 Cost factors for monitoring change in forest area
4.3.5 Cost factors for monitoring change in carbon stocks
4.3.6 Spatial data infrastructure, access and reporting procedures
4.4 Linking Monitoring and Policy Development
4.5 Key References for Section 4


5.
- Libro con arbitraje
Amartya sen's work and ideas: a gender perspective / edited by Bina Agarwal, Jane Humpries and Ingrid Robeyns
Agarwal, Bina (ed.) ; Humpries, Jane (coed.) ; Robeyns, Ingrid (coed.) ;
London : Routledge Taylor & Francis Group , 2005
Clasificación: 330.082 / A4
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
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SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010019238 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This unique volume is the first to examine Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen's ideas through the lens of gender. His humanitarian approach to economics has been crucial to the development of several aspects of feminist economics and gender analysis. This book outlines the range and usefulness of his work for gender analysis while also exploring some of its silences and implicit assumptions. The result is a collection of groundbreaking and insightful essays which cover major topics in Sen's work, such as the capability approach, justice, freedom, social choice, agency, missing women and development and well-being. Perspectives have been drawn from both developing and developed countries, with most of the authors applying Sen's concepts to cultural, geographic and historical contexts which differ from his original applications. Significant highlights include a wide-ranging conversation between the book's editors and Sen on many aspects of his work, and an essay by Sen himself on why he is disinclined to provide a definitive list of capabilities. These essays were previously published in Feminist Economics.

Índice

Amartya Sen: A Biographical Note
Exploring the Challenges of Amartya Sen’s Work and Ideas: An Introduction
Articles
1. Gender and the Foundations of Social Choice: The Role of Situated Agency
2. Capabilities as Fundamental Entitlements: Sen and Social Justice
3. Sen’s Capability Approach and Gender Inequality: Selecting Relevant Capabilities
4. Intra-household Inequality: A Challenge for the Capability Approach?
5. Development as Empowerment
6. Development as Freedom – and What Else?
7. Globalization and Women’s Paid Work: Expanding Freedom?
8. Slavery, Freedom, and Sen
9. Does Contraception Benefit Women? Structure, Agency and Well-Being in Rural Mexico
10. Sen, Ethics and Democracy
11. "Missing Women": Revisiting the Debate
12. The Human Development Paradigm: Operationalizing Sen’s Ideas on Capabilities
13. Continuing the Conversation
14. Capabilities, Lists, and Public Reason: Continuing the Conversation
Notes on Contributors
Index


6.
Libro
Justicia y paz: programa de ASDI para la paz, la democracia y los derechos humanos
Estocolmo, Suecia : Agencia Sueca de Cooperación Internacional para el Desarrollo. Departamento para el Desarrollo Democrático y Social , 1997
Clasificación: F/338.91 / J8
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
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SIBE San Cristóbal
SAF003439 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

7.
Libro
Descentralización industrial y desarrollo regional en México: una evalución del programa de parques y ciudades industriales, 1970-1986 / Ismael Aguilar Barajas
Aguilar Barajas, Ismael ;
México : El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Demográficos y de Desarrollo Urbano , 1993
Clasificación: 338.0972 / A3
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010009281 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

8.
Libro
El capitalismo del subdesarrollo / Alonso Aguilar Monteverde
Aguilar Monteverde, Alonso ;
México : Nuestro Tiempo , 1990
Clasificación: 330.122 / A38
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040000532 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

9.
Libro
Mercado interno y acumulación de capital / Alonso Aguilar M.
Aguilar Monteverde, Alonso ;
México : Nuestro Tiempo , 1974
Clasificación: 330.98 / A3
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
SAA001068 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

10.
Libro
Contribuciones para el estudio de la pesca artesanal en América Latina / editado por Max Agüero
Agüero, Max (ed.) ;
Manila, Philippines : International Center for Living Aquatic Resources Management , 1992
Clasificación: 639.2098 / C6
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040002488 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1