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No. de sistema: 000000519

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008 _ _ 151125s2015^^^^nyuo^^^f^^^^^z000^0^eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-yu
044 _ _ a| nyu
100 1 _ a| Charruau, Pierre Alexandre Rémy Robert
245 1 0 a| Amphibians and reptiles
506 _ _ a| Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
520 1 _ a| The three Mexican states of the Yucatán Peninsula have been relatively well explored for herpetofauna, when compared with other states of the country. However, most studies on the herpetofauna of the Yucatán Peninsula have focused on their diversity, taxonomy, and species distribution, and less on their ecology, behavior or conservation status. The major conservation efforts have focused on sea turtles. Although some conservation programs exist locally for crocodiles in the north of the peninsula, to date conservation strategies have mostly been restricted to the designation of protected areas. With 24 species of amphibians and 118 species of reptiles, the Yucatán Peninsula harbors 11.5 % of national herpetofauna diversity, and 19 % of species are endemic to the peninsula. Reptiles and amphibians are two major globally threatened groups of vertebrates, with amphibians being the most threatened vertebrate class. Both groups face the same threats, namely habitat loss and modification, pollution, overharvest for food and pet trade, introduction of exotic species, infectious diseases, and climatic change. Unfortunately, almost none of these issues have been investigated for key populations in the Yucatán Peninsula. For amphibians, studies exploring the presence of the chytrid fungus (Batracho- chytrium dendrobatidis) and the effects of climatic change are badly needed to understand the specific factors that negatively affect populations in this area. In general, conservation efforts for reptiles and amphibians in the Yucatán Peninsula need to include environmental education, scientific investigation, and law enforcement and application.
538 _ _ a| Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior
650 _ 4 a| Anfibios
650 _ 4 a| Reptiles
650 _ 4 a| Especies nativas
650 _ 4 a| Población animal
650 _ 4 a| Ecología animal
651 _ 4 a| Yucatán (Península) (México)
700 1 _ a| Cedeño-Vázquez, J.R.
c| Doctor
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Köhler, Gunther
e| coaut.
773 0 _
b| Gerald Alexander Islebe, Sophie Calmé, Jorge L. Leon-Cortés, Birgit Schmook, editors
t| Biodiversity and conservation of the Yucatan Peninsula
d| New York : Springer International Publishing Switzerland, 2015
g| p. 257-293
z| 978-3-319-06528-1
901 _ _ a| Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Noviembre 2015
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
906 _ _ a| Producción Académica ECOSUR
LNG eng
Cerrar
Amphibians and reptiles
Charruau, Pierre Alexandre Rémy Robert (autor)
Cedeño-Vázquez, J.R. (autor)
Köhler, Gunther (autor)
Nota: Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
Contenido en: Biodiversity and conservation of the Yucatan Peninsula / Gerald Alexander Islebe, Sophie Calmé, Jorge L. Leon-Cortés, Birgit Schmook, editors. New York : Springer International Publishing Switzerland, 2015. p. 257-293. ISBN: 978-3-319-06528-1
No. de sistema: 519
Tipo: - Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
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Inglés

"The three Mexican states of the Yucatán Peninsula have been relatively well explored for herpetofauna, when compared with other states of the country. However, most studies on the herpetofauna of the Yucatán Peninsula have focused on their diversity, taxonomy, and species distribution, and less on their ecology, behavior or conservation status. The major conservation efforts have focused on sea turtles. Although some conservation programs exist locally for crocodiles in the north of the peninsula, to date conservation strategies have mostly been restricted to the designation of protected areas. With 24 species of amphibians and 118 species of reptiles, the Yucatán Peninsula harbors 11.5 % of national herpetofauna diversity, and 19 % of species are endemic to the peninsula. Reptiles and amphibians are two major globally threatened groups of vertebrates, with amphibians being the most threatened vertebrate class. Both groups face the same threats, namely habitat loss and modification, pollution, overharvest for food and pet trade, introduction of exotic species, infectious diseases, and climatic change. Unfortunately, almost none of these issues have been investigated for key populations in the Yucatán Peninsula. For amphibians, studies exploring the presence of the chytrid fungus (Batracho- chytrium dendrobatidis) and the effects of climatic change are badly needed to understand the specific factors that negatively affect populations in this area. In general, conservation efforts for reptiles and amphibians in the Yucatán Peninsula need to include environmental education, scientific investigation, and law enforcement and application."


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