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No. de sistema: 000000967

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 141023m20149999xx^^r^p^^^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
044 _ _ a| mx
245 0 0 a| Effects of size, sex and teneral resources on the resistance to hydric stress in the tephritid fruit fly Anastrepha ludens
520 _ _ a| Water availability is recognized as one of the most important factors in the distribution and activity of terrestrial organisms. In the case of insects, hydric stress imposes a major challenge for survival because of the small surface-area-to-volume ratio they exhibit. In general, stress resistance is expected to co-vary positively with size; however, this pattern can become obscured in insects that exhibit sexual size dimorphism, as sexes differ in size and/or shape and have dissimilar resource allocations. In the present study, we use an allometric-based approach to (i) assess the desiccation and starvation stress resistance of teneral Anastrepha ludens flies, (ii) disentangle the relationships between resistance, size and sex and (iii) examine the adult fly body differences in water and lipid contents before and after exposure to stress. After controlling for sexual size dimorphism, an allometric increase of resistance with overall size was observed for all stress-based treatments. The scaling exponents that define the proportion of increase resistance varied with size traits and with type and degree of hydric stress. In this allometric relationship, and also in the relationships between mass and wing length and between size and teneral resources, the sexes maintained similar scaling exponents but differed in the intercepts. Males were more resistant to stress than females; this competitive advantage is probably linked to greater amounts of teneral lipids and more water use during stress.
538 _ _ a| Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior
650 _ 4 a| Moscas de la fruta
650 _ 4 a| Estrés de sequía
650 _ 4 a| Dimorfismo sexual en animales
700 1 _ a| Tejeda, Marco Tulio
700 1 _ a| Arredondo Jiménez, Juan Ignacio
c| Doctor
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Pérez Staples, Diana
e| coaut.
n| 16302255500
700 1 _ a| Ramos Morales, Patricia
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Liedo Fernández, Pablo
c| Doctor
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Díaz Fleischer, Francisco
e| coaut.
773 0 _
t| Journal of Insect Physiology
g| Vol. 70, (November 2014), p. 73-80
x| 0022-1910
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Octubre 2014
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
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Effects of size, sex and teneral resources on the resistance to hydric stress in the tephritid fruit fly Anastrepha ludens
Tejeda, Marco Tulio (autor)
Arredondo Jiménez, Juan Ignacio (autor)
Pérez Staples, Diana (autor)
Ramos Morales, Patricia (autor)
Liedo Fernández, Pablo (autor)
Díaz Fleischer, Francisco (autor)
Contenido en: Journal of Insect Physiology. Vol. 70, (November 2014), p. 73-80. ISSN: 0022-1910
No. de sistema: 967
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
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"Water availability is recognized as one of the most important factors in the distribution and activity of terrestrial organisms. In the case of insects, hydric stress imposes a major challenge for survival because of the small surface-area-to-volume ratio they exhibit. In general, stress resistance is expected to co-vary positively with size; however, this pattern can become obscured in insects that exhibit sexual size dimorphism, as sexes differ in size and/or shape and have dissimilar resource allocations. In the present study, we use an allometric-based approach to (i) assess the desiccation and starvation stress resistance of teneral Anastrepha ludens flies, (ii) disentangle the relationships between resistance, size and sex and (iii) examine the adult fly body differences in water and lipid contents before and after exposure to stress. After controlling for sexual size dimorphism, an allometric increase of resistance with overall size was observed for all stress-based treatments. The scaling exponents that define the proportion of increase resistance varied with size traits and with type and degree of hydric stress. In this allometric relationship, and also in the relationships between mass and wing length and between size and teneral resources, the sexes maintained similar scaling exponents but differed in the intercepts. Males were more resistant to stress than females; this competitive advantage is probably linked to greater amounts of teneral lipids and more water use during stress."


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