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No. de sistema: 000009532

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 200819m20209999xx^^r^p^o^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
044 _ _ a| xx
245 0 0 a| Attractiveness and sexual competitiveness of Anastrepha obliqua males (Diptera: Tephritidae) fed on a diet enriched with providencia rettgeri
506 _ _ a| Acceso en línea sin restricciones
520 1 _ a| The West Indian fruit fly, Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart), is the second most important tephritid fruit fly in Mexico, infesting mango, hog plum and guava fruits. To control this pest, the Mexican government has implemented the use of the sterile insect technique (SIT), which involves the mass production, sterilization and release of flies. However, the A. obliqua laboratory males used in SIT are selected to a lesser extent by the wild females during competitiveness tests. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of males fed on fruit fly food enriched with Providencia rettgeri to those in males fed on food alone, assessing male mating competitiveness, capture of females using traps baited with males fed with the enriched diet and sex pheromone components. The results indicated that males fed with the diet enriched with P. rettgeri had increased mating competitiveness and captured more females in the field cage tests. However, no difference was observed in the proportion of volatile sex pheromone components identified during the calling of A. obliqua males. The results suggest the value of incorporating bacteria into the mass rearing technique of A. obliqua adults in order to improve the sexual competitiveness of males from the laboratory compared to wild males.
650 _ 4 a| Anastrepha obliqua
650 _ 4 a| Moscas de la fruta
650 _ 4 a| Providencia rettgeri
650 _ 4 a| Bacterias
650 _ 4 a| Feromonas sexuales
650 _ 4 a| Conducta sexual en los animales
650 _ 4 a| Control de plagas
700 1 _ a| Roque Romero, Linnet
e| autora
700 1 _ a| Hernández Ortiz, Emilio
c| Doctor
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Aceituno Medina, Marysol
e| autora
n| 55515722900
700 1 _ a| Ventura González, Carmen
e| autora
700 1 _ a| Toledo, Jorge
c| Dr.
e| autor
n| 7005977045
700 1 _ a| Malo Rivera, Edi Álvaro
c| Doctor
e| autor
773 0 _
t| Frontier Microbiol
g| Volumen 11, número 1777 (July 2020), p. 1-9
x| 2624-8212
856 4 1 u| https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2020.01777/full
z| Artículo electrónico
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| BG / MM
904 _ _ a| Agosto 2020
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
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Attractiveness and sexual competitiveness of Anastrepha obliqua males (Diptera: Tephritidae) fed on a diet enriched with providencia rettgeri
Roque Romero, Linnet (autora)
Hernández Ortiz, Emilio (autor)
Aceituno Medina, Marysol (autora)
Ventura González, Carmen (autora)
Toledo, Jorge (autor)
Malo Rivera, Edi Álvaro (autor)
Nota: Acceso en línea sin restricciones
Contenido en: Frontier Microbiol. Volumen 11, número 1777 (July 2020), p. 1-9. ISSN: 2624-8212
No. de sistema: 9532
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
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Inglés

"The West Indian fruit fly, Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart), is the second most important tephritid fruit fly in Mexico, infesting mango, hog plum and guava fruits. To control this pest, the Mexican government has implemented the use of the sterile insect technique (SIT), which involves the mass production, sterilization and release of flies. However, the A. obliqua laboratory males used in SIT are selected to a lesser extent by the wild females during competitiveness tests. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of males fed on fruit fly food enriched with Providencia rettgeri to those in males fed on food alone, assessing male mating competitiveness, capture of females using traps baited with males fed with the enriched diet and sex pheromone components. The results indicated that males fed with the diet enriched with P. rettgeri had increased mating competitiveness and captured more females in the field cage tests. However, no difference was observed in the proportion of volatile sex pheromone components identified during the calling of A. obliqua males. The results suggest the value of incorporating bacteria into the mass rearing technique of A. obliqua adults in order to improve the sexual competitiveness of males from the laboratory compared to wild males."