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No. de sistema: 000009698

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008 _ _ 200914m20209999xx^^r^p^o^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
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245 0 0 a| Fine root density and vertical distribution of Leucaena leucocephala and grasses in silvopastoral systems under two harvest intervals
506 _ _ a| Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
520 1 _ a| Understanding belowground morphological mechanisms of trees and grasses is a complicated task but can help in the design and management of silvopastoral systems. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the harvest intervals (i.e. 30 and 50 days) of aboveground biomass on the fine root density and vertical distribution in two silvopastoral systems (SPS): one comprising Leucaena leucocephala (legume tree) and Cynodon plectostachyus (grass) and the other L. leucocephala and Panicum maximum. We used a completely randomized design with four repetitions. We sampled fine roots by using a metal cylinder (8 cm diameter and 50 cm length) 7 days after each harvest. We washed the samples with pressurized water to separate them from the soil. The roots were digitalized at a resolution of 600 dpi to determine the diameter and specific root length by using IJ Rhizo Ò software. Samples were subsequently dried to quantify fine root mass. We found that the greater percentages of fine roots were between 0.4 and 0.8 mm for the legume and between 0.2 and 0.4 mm for grasses. The fine root length and mass density of P. maximum was higher (P\0.001) compared to C. plectostachyus in both harvest intervals. However, the fine root density of L. leucocephala did not vary between SPS (P> 0.05). The effect of harvest interval was significant only in some soil layers in both SPS (P> 0.05). Most of the pasture roots were found in the upper soil layer (0–20 cm), while L. leucocephala roots were present to deeper soil layers. We conclude that P. maximum has a greater rooting capacity and amore rapid recovery than C. plectostachyus, which has greater diameters and lower root density. However, L. leucocephala presented deeper and thicker fine rootsin both SPS, which is a good indication of its belowground recovery capacity to aboveground disturbances.
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650 _ 4 a| Leucaena leucocephala
650 _ 4 a| Cynodon plectostachyus
650 _ 4 a| Panicum maximum
650 _ 4 a| Biomasa de raíces
650 _ 4 a| Sistemas silvopastoriles
700 1 _ a| Montejo Martínez, David
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Díaz Echeverria, Víctor Francisco
c| Maestro
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Villanueva López, Gilberto
c| Dr.
e| autor
n| 55822436600
700 1 _ a| Aryal, Deb Raj
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Casanova Lugo, Fernando
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Canul Solís, Jorge Rodolfo
c| Doctor
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Escobedo Mex, José Guadalupe
e| autor
773 0 _
t| Agroforest Syst
g| Volumen 94, número 3 (June 2020), páginas 843-855
x| 1572-9680
900 _ _ a| Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
902 _ _ a| BG / MM
904 _ _ a| Septiembre 2020
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
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Fine root density and vertical distribution of Leucaena leucocephala and grasses in silvopastoral systems under two harvest intervals
Montejo Martínez, David (autor)
Díaz Echeverria, Víctor Francisco (autor)
Villanueva López, Gilberto (autor)
Aryal, Deb Raj (autor)
Casanova Lugo, Fernando (autor)
Canul Solís, Jorge Rodolfo (autor)
Escobedo Mex, José Guadalupe (autor)
Nota: Disponible en línea
Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
Contenido en: Agroforest Syst. Volumen 94, número 3 (June 2020), páginas 843-855. ISSN: 1572-9680
No. de sistema: 9698
Tipo: Artículo
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"Understanding belowground morphological mechanisms of trees and grasses is a complicated task but can help in the design and management of silvopastoral systems. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the harvest intervals (i.e. 30 and 50 days) of aboveground biomass on the fine root density and vertical distribution in two silvopastoral systems (SPS): one comprising Leucaena leucocephala (legume tree) and Cynodon plectostachyus (grass) and the other L. leucocephala and Panicum maximum. We used a completely randomized design with four repetitions. We sampled fine roots by using a metal cylinder (8 cm diameter and 50 cm length) 7 days after each harvest. We washed the samples with pressurized water to separate them from the soil. The roots were digitalized at a resolution of 600 dpi to determine the diameter and specific root length by using IJ Rhizo Ò software. Samples were subsequently dried to quantify fine root mass. We found that the greater percentages of fine roots were between 0.4 and 0.8 mm for the legume and between 0.2 and 0.4 mm for grasses. The fine root length and mass density of P. maximum was higher (P\0.001) compared to C. plectostachyus in both harvest intervals. However, the fine root density of L. leucocephala did not vary between SPS (P> 0.05). The effect of harvest interval was significant only in some soil layers in both SPS (P> 0.05). Most of the pasture roots were found in the upper soil layer (0–20 cm), while L. leucocephala roots were present to deeper soil layers. We conclude that P. maximum has a greater rooting capacity and amore rapid recovery than C. plectostachyus, which has greater diameters and lower root density. However, L. leucocephala presented deeper and thicker fine rootsin both SPS, which is a good indication of its belowground recovery capacity to aboveground disturbances."


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