Cerrar

No. de sistema: 000009976

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 170316m20179999xx^^r^p^^^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-tb
044 _ _ a| xx
245 0 0 a| Growth of four tropical tree species in petroleum-contaminated soil and effects of crude oil contamination
506 _ _ a| Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
520 1 _ a| Under greenhouse conditions, we evaluated establishment of four tree species and their capacity to degrade crude oil recently incorporated into the soil; the species were as follows: Cedrela odorata (tropical cedar), Haematoxylum campechianum (tinto bush), Swietenia macrophylla (mahogany), and Tabebuia rosea (macuilis). Three-month-old plants were planted in soil with three treatments of heavy petroleum and a control (C0 0 mg kg−¹; C1 18,000 mg kg−¹; C2 31,700 mg kg−¹; C3 47,100 mg kg−¹) with four repetitions per treatment and species; the experiment was carried out for 245 days. Height and biomass of all species significantly diminished as petroleum concentration increased, although plant survival was not affected. The quantity of colonyforming units (CFU) of rhizospheric bacteria varied among tree species and treatments; petroleum stimulated bacterial CFU for S. macrophylla. The number of fungi CFU for S. macrophylla and T. rosea was significantly greater in C0 than in soil with petroleum, but among species and among different concentrations, no significant differences were found. The greatest percentage of total petroleumhydrocarbon (TPH) degradation was found in C1 for soil without plants (45 %). Differences from the remaining treatments (petroleum concentrations in soil and plant species) were not significant (P < 0.05). Among all trees, H. campechianum had the greatest TPH degradation (32.5 % in C2). T. rosea (C1) and H. campechianum (C2) resulted in petroleum degradation at levels ranging from 20.5 to 32.5 %. On the basis of this experiment, the tree species used did not improve TPH degradation. However, all of them showed high rates of survival and vigor. So, as tree species provide goods and services, experiments with inoculation of hydrocarbonclastic microorganisms, addition of fertilizers, and mixture of tree and grasses are recommended.
650 _ 4 a| Árboles tropicales
650 _ 4 a| Cedrela odorata
650 _ 4 a| Palo de Campeche
650 _ 4 a| Swietenia macrophylla
650 _ 4 a| Tabebuia rosea
650 _ 4 a| Contaminación de suelos
650 _ 4 a| Contaminación por petróleo
650 _ 4 a| Fitorremediación
651 _ 4 a| Tabasco (México)
700 1 _ a| Pérez Hernández, Isidro
700 1 _ a| Ochoa Gaona, Susana
c| Dra.
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Adams, R.H.
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Rivera Cruz, María del Carmen
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Pérez Hernández, V.
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Jarquín Sánchez, Aarón
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Geissen Geissen, Violette
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Martínez Zurimendi, Pablo
e| coaut.
n| 24465373100
773 0 _
t| Environmental Science and Pollution Research
g| Vol. 24, no. 2 (January 2017), p. 1769–1783
x| 1614-7499
900 _ _ a| Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Marzo 2017
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Desastres
905 _ _ a| Servibosques
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
Cerrar
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Growth of four tropical tree species in petroleum-contaminated soil and effects of crude oil contamination
Pérez Hernández, Isidro (autor)
Ochoa Gaona, Susana (autor)
Adams, R.H. (autor)
Rivera Cruz, María del Carmen (autor)
Pérez Hernández, V. (autor)
Jarquín Sánchez, Aarón (autor)
Geissen Geissen, Violette (autor)
Martínez Zurimendi, Pablo (autor)
Nota: Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
Contenido en: Environmental Science and Pollution Research. Vol. 24, no. 2 (January 2017), p. 1769–1783. ISSN: 1614-7499
No. de sistema: 9976
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje


Inglés

"Under greenhouse conditions, we evaluated establishment of four tree species and their capacity to degrade crude oil recently incorporated into the soil; the species were as follows: Cedrela odorata (tropical cedar), Haematoxylum campechianum (tinto bush), Swietenia macrophylla (mahogany), and Tabebuia rosea (macuilis). Three-month-old plants were planted in soil with three treatments of heavy petroleum and a control (C0 0 mg kg−¹; C1 18,000 mg kg−¹; C2 31,700 mg kg−¹; C3 47,100 mg kg−¹) with four repetitions per treatment and species; the experiment was carried out for 245 days. Height and biomass of all species significantly diminished as petroleum concentration increased, although plant survival was not affected. The quantity of colonyforming units (CFU) of rhizospheric bacteria varied among tree species and treatments; petroleum stimulated bacterial CFU for S. macrophylla. The number of fungi CFU for S. macrophylla and T. rosea was significantly greater in C0 than in soil with petroleum, but among species and among different concentrations, no significant differences were found. The greatest percentage of total petroleumhydrocarbon (TPH) degradation was found in C1 for soil without plants (45 %). Differences from the remaining treatments (petroleum concentrations in soil and plant species) were not significant (P < 0.05). Among all trees, H. campechianum had the greatest TPH degradation (32.5 % in C2). T. rosea (C1) and H. campechianum (C2) resulted in petroleum degradation at levels ranging from 20.5 to 32.5 %. On the basis of this experiment, the tree species used did not improve TPH degradation. However, all of them showed high rates of survival and vigor. So, as tree species provide goods and services, experiments with inoculation of hydrocarbonclastic microorganisms, addition of fertilizers, and mixture of tree and grasses are recommended."