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No. de sistema: 000011765

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 100202m20109999ne^mr^p^^^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-cp
044 _ _ a| ne
084 _ _ a| AR/363.738747
b| C3
245 0 0 a| Carbon sequestration through agroforestry in indigenous communities of Chiapas, Mexico
520 1 _ a| The importance of agroforestry systems as carbon sinks has recently been recognized due to the need of climate change mitigation. The objective of this study was to compare the carbon content in living biomass, soil (0–10, 10–20, 20–30 cm in depth), dead organic matter between a set of non-agroforestry and agroforestry prototypes in Chiapas, Mexico where the carbon sequestration programme called Scolel’te has been carried out. The prototypes compared were: traditional maize (rotational prototype with pioneer native trees evaluated in the crop period), Taungya (maize with timber trees), improved fallow, traditional fallow (the last three rotational prototypes in the crop-free period), Inga-shade-organic coffee, polyculture-shade organic coffee, polyculture-non-organic coffee, pasture without trees, pasture with live fences, and pasture with scattered trees. Taungya and improved fallow were designed agroforestry prototypes, while the others were reproduced traditional systems.
520 1 _ a| Seventy-nine plots were selected in three agro-climatic zones. Carbon in living biomass, dead biomass, and soil organic matter was measured in each plot. Results showed that carbon in living biomass and dead organic matter were different according to prototype; while soil organic carbon and total carbon were influenced mostly by the agro-climatic zone (P < 0.01). Carbon density in the high tropical agro-climatic zone (1,000 m) was higher compared to the intermediate and low tropical agro-climatic zones (600 and 200 m, respectively, P < 0.01). All the systems contained more carbon than traditional maize and pastures without trees. Silvopastoral systems, improved fallow, Taungya and coffee systems (especially polyculture-shade coffee and organic coffee) have the potential to sequester carbon via growing trees. Agroforestry systems could also contribute to carbon sequestration and reducing emissions when burning is avoided. The potential of organic coffee to maintain carbon in soil and to reduce emissions from deforestation and ecosystem degradation (REDD) is discussed.
533 _ _ a| Reproducción electrónica en formato PDF
538 _ _ a| Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior
650 _ 4 a| Captura de carbono
650 _ 4 a| Cambio climático
650 _ 4 a| Café orgánico
650 _ 4 a| Maíz
650 _ 4 a| Forraje
650 _ 4 a| Sistemas agroforestales
651 _ 4 a| Chilón (Chiapas, México)
651 _ 4 a| Arroyo Palenque, Salto de Agua (Chiapas, México)
651 _ 4 a| La Corona, Marqués de Comillas (Chiapas, México)
651 _ 4 a| Reforma Agraria, Marqués de Comillas (Chiapas, México)
700 1 _ a| Soto Pinto, Lorena
d| 1958-
700 1 _ a| Anzueto Martínez, Manuel de Jesús
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Mendoza Vega, Jorge
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Jiménez Ferrer, Guillermo
c| Dr.
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph
e| coaut.
773 0 _
t| Agroforestry Systems
g| Vol. 78, no. 1 (enero de 2010), p. 39-51
x| 0167-4366
900 _ _ a| En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG/MM
904 _ _ a| Febrero 2010
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Servibosques
905 _ _ a| Café
905 _ _ a| CRIIS
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
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*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Carbon sequestration through agroforestry in indigenous communities of Chiapas, Mexico
Soto Pinto, Lorena, 1958- (autor)
Anzueto Martínez, Manuel de Jesús (autor)
Mendoza Vega, Jorge (autor)
Jiménez Ferrer, Guillermo (autor)
De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (autor)
Clasificación: AR/363.738747/C3
Contenido en: Agroforestry Systems. Vol. 78, no. 1 (enero de 2010), p. 39-51. ISSN: 0167-4366
Bibliotecas:
San Cristóbal
No. de sistema: 11765
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje


Inglés

"The importance of agroforestry systems as carbon sinks has recently been recognized due to the need of climate change mitigation. The objective of this study was to compare the carbon content in living biomass, soil (0–10, 10–20, 20–30 cm in depth), dead organic matter between a set of non-agroforestry and agroforestry prototypes in Chiapas, Mexico where the carbon sequestration programme called Scolel’te has been carried out. The prototypes compared were: traditional maize (rotational prototype with pioneer native trees evaluated in the crop period), Taungya (maize with timber trees), improved fallow, traditional fallow (the last three rotational prototypes in the crop-free period), Inga-shade-organic coffee, polyculture-shade organic coffee, polyculture-non-organic coffee, pasture without trees, pasture with live fences, and pasture with scattered trees. Taungya and improved fallow were designed agroforestry prototypes, while the others were reproduced traditional systems."

"Seventy-nine plots were selected in three agro-climatic zones. Carbon in living biomass, dead biomass, and soil organic matter was measured in each plot. Results showed that carbon in living biomass and dead organic matter were different according to prototype; while soil organic carbon and total carbon were influenced mostly by the agro-climatic zone (P < 0.01). Carbon density in the high tropical agro-climatic zone (1,000 m) was higher compared to the intermediate and low tropical agro-climatic zones (600 and 200 m, respectively, P < 0.01). All the systems contained more carbon than traditional maize and pastures without trees. Silvopastoral systems, improved fallow, Taungya and coffee systems (especially polyculture-shade coffee and organic coffee) have the potential to sequester carbon via growing trees. Agroforestry systems could also contribute to carbon sequestration and reducing emissions when burning is avoided. The potential of organic coffee to maintain carbon in soil and to reduce emissions from deforestation and ecosystem degradation (REDD) is discussed."

SIBE San Cristóbal
Codigo de barra
Estado
Colección
ECO010002348
(Disponible)
Artículos de investigación ECOSUR
11838-30
(Disponible)
Artículos de investigación ECOSUR

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