Cerrar

No. de sistema: 000013348

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 170916m20179999xx^^r^p^^^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-qr
044 _ _ a| xx
100 1 _ a| Pérez Lachaud, Gabriela
245 1 0 a| Hidden biodiversity in entomological collections
b| the overlooked co-occurrence of dipteran and hymenopteran ant parasitoids in stored biological material
520 1 _ a| Biological collections around the world are the repository of biodiversity on Earth; they also hold a large quantity of unsorted, unidentified, or misidentified material and can house behavioral information on species that are difficult to access or no longer available to science. Among the unsorted, alcohol-preserved material stored in the Formicidae Collection of the `El Colegio de la Frontera Sur' Research Center (Chetumal, Mexico), we found nine colonies of the ponerine ant Neoponera villosa, that had been collected in bromeliads at Calakmul (Campeche, Mexico) in 1999. Ants and their brood were revised for the presence of any sign of parasitism. Cocoons were dissected and their content examined under a stereomicroscope. Six N. villosa prepupae had been attacked by the ectoparasitoid syrphid fly Hypselosyrphus trigonus Hull (Syrphidae: Microdontinae), to date the only known dipteran species of the Microdontinae with a parasitoid lifestyle. In addition, six male pupae from three colonies contained gregarious endoparasitoid wasps. These were specialized in parasitizing this specific host caste as no gyne or worker pupae displayed signs of having been attacked. Only immature stages (larvae and pupae) of the wasp could be obtained. Due to the long storage period, DNA amplification failed; however, based on biological and morphological data, pupae were placed in the Encyrtidae family.
520 1 _ a| This is the first record of an encyrtid wasp parasitizing N. villosa, and the second example of an encyrtid as a primary parasitoid of ants. Furthermore, it is also the first record of co-occurrence of a dipteran ectoparasitoid and a hymenopteran endoparasitoid living in sympatry within the same population of host ants. Our findings highlight the importance of biological collections as reservoirs of hidden biodiversity, not only at the taxonomic level, but also at the behavioral level, revealing complex living networks. They also highlight the need for funding in order to carry out biodiversity inventories and manage existing collections.
538 _ _ a| Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior
650 _ 4 a| Pachycondyla villosa
650 _ 4 a| Hormigas
650 _ 4 a| Hypselosyrphus trigonus
650 _ 4 a| Parasitoides
651 _ 4 a| Zoh-Laguna (Álvaro Obregón), Calakmul (Campeche, México)
700 1 _ a| Lachaud, Jean Paul
e| coaut.
773 0 _
b| Vol. 12, no. 9, e0184614 (September 2017), p. 1-13
t| PLoS ONE
x| 1932-6203
856 4 1 u| http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0184614
z| Artículo electrónico
856 _ _ u| http://aleph.ecosur.mx:8991/F?func=service&doc_library=CFS01&local_base=CFS01&doc_number=000013348&line_number=0001&func_code=DB_RECORDS&service_type=MEDIA
y| Artículo electrónico
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Septiembre 2017
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
906 _ _ a| Producción Académica ECOSUR
LNG eng
Cerrar
Hidden biodiversity in entomological collections: the overlooked co-occurrence of dipteran and hymenopteran ant parasitoids in stored biological material
Pérez Lachaud, Gabriela (autor)
Lachaud, Jean Paul (autor)
Contenido en: PLoS ONE / Vol. 12, no. 9, e0184614 (September 2017), p. 1-13 ISSN: 1932-6203
No. de sistema: 13348
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
PDF PDF
  • Consulta (1)




Inglés

"Biological collections around the world are the repository of biodiversity on Earth; they also hold a large quantity of unsorted, unidentified, or misidentified material and can house behavioral information on species that are difficult to access or no longer available to science. Among the unsorted, alcohol-preserved material stored in the Formicidae Collection of the `El Colegio de la Frontera Sur' Research Center (Chetumal, Mexico), we found nine colonies of the ponerine ant Neoponera villosa, that had been collected in bromeliads at Calakmul (Campeche, Mexico) in 1999. Ants and their brood were revised for the presence of any sign of parasitism. Cocoons were dissected and their content examined under a stereomicroscope. Six N. villosa prepupae had been attacked by the ectoparasitoid syrphid fly Hypselosyrphus trigonus Hull (Syrphidae: Microdontinae), to date the only known dipteran species of the Microdontinae with a parasitoid lifestyle. In addition, six male pupae from three colonies contained gregarious endoparasitoid wasps. These were specialized in parasitizing this specific host caste as no gyne or worker pupae displayed signs of having been attacked. Only immature stages (larvae and pupae) of the wasp could be obtained. Due to the long storage period, DNA amplification failed; however, based on biological and morphological data, pupae were placed in the Encyrtidae family."

"This is the first record of an encyrtid wasp parasitizing N. villosa, and the second example of an encyrtid as a primary parasitoid of ants. Furthermore, it is also the first record of co-occurrence of a dipteran ectoparasitoid and a hymenopteran endoparasitoid living in sympatry within the same population of host ants. Our findings highlight the importance of biological collections as reservoirs of hidden biodiversity, not only at the taxonomic level, but also at the behavioral level, revealing complex living networks. They also highlight the need for funding in order to carry out biodiversity inventories and manage existing collections."


  • Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior