Cerrar

No. de sistema: 000023800

LDR _ _ 00000naa^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 151125s2015^^^^nyuo^^^f^^^^^z000^0^eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-yu
044 _ _ a| nyu
100 1 _ a| Villanueva Gutiérrez, Rogel
c| Dr.
245 1 0 a| Bee–plant interactions
b| competition and phenology of flowers visited by bees
506 _ _ a| Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
520 1 _ a| We present results of the flowering phenology of most plant species visited by European and Africanized honey bee (Apis mellifera ligustica and A. mellifera scutellata, respectively) in the Yucatán Peninsula. Colonies from both bee types visited the largest number of plant species at the end of the wet season (September and October) and the beginning of the dry season (November). A calendar is presented to indicate the community phenology of the floral resources of Apis mellifera. Comparisons were made in order to assess potential competition between both honey bee groups and between honey bees and native bees in relation to their food resources. Trees were also a constant pollen resource for Apis mellifera and Melipona beecheii, a native stingless bee. Solitary bees and M. beecheii bee seemed to change their floral resource use, both show ‘resource partitioning’ to avoid competition. For example, two important plant families, Anacardiaceae and Euphorbiaceae, were lost to competing honey bees, but compensated for by greater use of Fabaceae, Rubiaceae, and Sapotaceae among solitary bees. Invasive generalist pollinators may, however, cause specialized competitors to fail, especially in less biodiverse environments. Deforestation, hurricanes, and fires are three factors that affect the habitat and food resources for bee colonies. Within agricultural areas, having large areas of natural vegetation, corridors, or strips of vegetation between the crop fields is important to favor adequate diversity of natural pollinators for pollination of crop plants.
650 _ 4 a| Abejas
650 _ 4 a| Apis mellifera ligustica
650 _ 4 a| Abeja africana
650 _ 4 a| Melipona beecheii
650 _ 4 a| Relación insecto-planta
650 _ 4 a| Fenología vegetal
650 _ 4 a| Palinología
650 _ 4 a| Competencia (Biología)
651 _ 4 a| Las Palmas, Felipe Carrillo Puerto (Quintana Roo, México)
651 _ 4 a| Santa Teresa, Felipe Carrillo Puerto (Quintana Roo, México)
700 1 _ a| Roubik, David Ward
d| 1951-
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Porter Bolland, Luciana
e| coaut.
773 0 _
b| Gerald Alexander Islebe, Sophie Calmé, Jorge L. Leon-Cortés, Birgit Schmook, editors
t| Biodiversity and conservation of the Yucatan Peninsula
d| New York : Springer International Publishing Switzerland, 2015
g| p. 131-152
z| 978-3-319-06528-1
901 _ _ a| Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Noviembre 2015
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
906 _ _ a| Producción Académica ECOSUR
LNG eng
Cerrar
Bee–plant interactions: competition and phenology of flowers visited by bees
Villanueva Gutiérrez, Rogel (autor)
Roubik, David Ward, 1951- (autor)
Porter Bolland, Luciana (autor)
Nota: Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
Contenido en: Biodiversity and conservation of the Yucatan Peninsula / Gerald Alexander Islebe, Sophie Calmé, Jorge L. Leon-Cortés, Birgit Schmook, editors. New York : Springer International Publishing Switzerland, 2015. p. 131-152. ISBN: 978-3-319-06528-1
No. de sistema: 23800
Tipo: - Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
PDF


Inglés

"We present results of the flowering phenology of most plant species visited by European and Africanized honey bee (Apis mellifera ligustica and A. mellifera scutellata, respectively) in the Yucatán Peninsula. Colonies from both bee types visited the largest number of plant species at the end of the wet season (September and October) and the beginning of the dry season (November). A calendar is presented to indicate the community phenology of the floral resources of Apis mellifera. Comparisons were made in order to assess potential competition between both honey bee groups and between honey bees and native bees in relation to their food resources. Trees were also a constant pollen resource for Apis mellifera and Melipona beecheii, a native stingless bee. Solitary bees and M. beecheii bee seemed to change their floral resource use, both show ‘resource partitioning’ to avoid competition. For example, two important plant families, Anacardiaceae and Euphorbiaceae, were lost to competing honey bees, but compensated for by greater use of Fabaceae, Rubiaceae, and Sapotaceae among solitary bees. Invasive generalist pollinators may, however, cause specialized competitors to fail, especially in less biodiverse environments. Deforestation, hurricanes, and fires are three factors that affect the habitat and food resources for bee colonies. Within agricultural areas, having large areas of natural vegetation, corridors, or strips of vegetation between the crop fields is important to favor adequate diversity of natural pollinators for pollination of crop plants."