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No. de sistema: 000029619

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008 _ _ 150508m20159999xx^br^p^o^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-qr
044 _ _ a| xx
245 0 0 a| Environmental and socioeconomic assessment of a poorly known coastal section in the southern Mexican Caribbean
506 _ _ a| Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
520 1 _ a| The Uvero-Punta Piedras section, a low-developed coastal strip located in the southern area of Quintana Roo, Mexico, is experiencing habitat degradation driven by unplanned population sprawl, unregulated tourism expansion and overfishing. The main objective of this study is to provide an environmental (coastal vegetation and coral reef condition) and socioeconomic (human population condition) baseline data of a poorly documented and weakly managed zone by the use of a set of rapid assessment methodologies, looking to assist the regional efforts to manage these coastal resources. To achieve this goal we used a series of surveying methods including remote sensing, geographic information systems and in situ land/underwater surveys, to allow a broad characterization of the resources' condition in the study zone. Results showed that reef habitat was dominated by macro-algae (61.2 ± 7.6%), followed by soft coral (gorgonians, 12.4 ± 4.1%), hard coral (8.2 ± 5.1%) and sponges (2.5 ± 1.3%). Zooanthids and tunicates represented less than 1% of the total; coral and macro algae estimates suggest a decline from records of 15 years ago. Highest fish densities were (144 ± 124 individuals/100 m2), while lowest were (83 ± 25 individuals/100 m2).
520 1 _ a| The total average fish density recorded could also be reflecting a decrease trend in the reef community structure. The main economic activities in the area are fishing and land clearing. From December 2003, 22% (corresponding to 44 ha) of the total original vegetation cover in the studied area was deforested. By February 2007, the deforested area increased 4.4 ha more. Should this tendency continue, by 2025 it would only maintain 24% of its total coastal vegetation cover representing a huge habitat loss. The future of economic activities in these areas lie directly on the establishment of appropriate management strategies for the protection and conservation of the renowned biodiversity that this area comprises.
650 _ 4 a| Arrecifes de coral
650 _ 4 a| Cobertura vegetal
650 _ 4 a| Fragmentación de hábitats
650 _ 4 a| Factores socioeconómicos
650 _ 4 a| Evaluación ecológica (Biología)
651 _ 4 a| Playa Uvero, Othón P. Blanco (Quintana Roo, México)
651 _ 4 a| Punta Piedras, Othón P. Blanco (Quintana Roo, México)
700 1 _ a| Figueroa Zavala, Baruch
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Correa Sandoval, Jorge
e| autor
n| 57004397800
700 1 _ a| Ruíz Zárate, Miguel Ángel
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Weissenberger, Holger
e| autor
700 1 _ a| González Solís, David
e| autor
773 0 _
t| Ocean & Coastal Management
g| Vol. 110 (June 2015), p. 25–37
x| 0964-5691
900 _ _ a| Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Mayo 2015
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
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*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Environmental and socioeconomic assessment of a poorly known coastal section in the southern Mexican Caribbean
Figueroa Zavala, Baruch (autor)
Correa Sandoval, Jorge (autor)
Ruíz Zárate, Miguel Ángel (autor)
Weissenberger, Holger (autor)
González Solís, David (autor)
Nota: Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
Contenido en: Ocean & Coastal Management. Vol. 110 (June 2015), p. 25–37. ISSN: 0964-5691
No. de sistema: 29619
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
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Inglés

"The Uvero-Punta Piedras section, a low-developed coastal strip located in the southern area of Quintana Roo, Mexico, is experiencing habitat degradation driven by unplanned population sprawl, unregulated tourism expansion and overfishing. The main objective of this study is to provide an environmental (coastal vegetation and coral reef condition) and socioeconomic (human population condition) baseline data of a poorly documented and weakly managed zone by the use of a set of rapid assessment methodologies, looking to assist the regional efforts to manage these coastal resources. To achieve this goal we used a series of surveying methods including remote sensing, geographic information systems and in situ land/underwater surveys, to allow a broad characterization of the resources' condition in the study zone. Results showed that reef habitat was dominated by macro-algae (61.2 ± 7.6%), followed by soft coral (gorgonians, 12.4 ± 4.1%), hard coral (8.2 ± 5.1%) and sponges (2.5 ± 1.3%). Zooanthids and tunicates represented less than 1% of the total; coral and macro algae estimates suggest a decline from records of 15 years ago. Highest fish densities were (144 ± 124 individuals/100 m2), while lowest were (83 ± 25 individuals/100 m2)."

"The total average fish density recorded could also be reflecting a decrease trend in the reef community structure. The main economic activities in the area are fishing and land clearing. From December 2003, 22% (corresponding to 44 ha) of the total original vegetation cover in the studied area was deforested. By February 2007, the deforested area increased 4.4 ha more. Should this tendency continue, by 2025 it would only maintain 24% of its total coastal vegetation cover representing a huge habitat loss. The future of economic activities in these areas lie directly on the establishment of appropriate management strategies for the protection and conservation of the renowned biodiversity that this area comprises."