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No. de sistema: 000035148

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040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-yu
044 _ _ a| xx
245 0 0 a| Beyond the colours
b| discovering hidden diversity in the Nymphalidae of the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico through DNA barcoding
520 1 _ a| Background: Recent studies have demonstrated the utility of DNA barcoding in the discovery of overlooked species and in the connection of immature and adult stages. In this study, we use DNA barcoding to examine diversity patterns in 121 species of Nymphalidae from the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. Our results suggest the presence of cryptic species in 8 of these 121 taxa. As well, the reference database derived from the analysis of adult specimens allowed the identification of nymphalid caterpillars providing new details on host plant use. Methodology/Principal Findings: We gathered DNA barcode sequences from 857 adult Nymphalidae representing 121 different species. This total includes four species (Adelpha iphiclus, Adelpha malea, Hamadryas iphtime and Taygetis laches) that were initially overlooked because of their close morphological similarity to other species. The barcode results showed that each of the 121 species possessed a diagnostic array of barcode sequences. In addition, there was evidence of cryptic taxa; seven species included two barcode clusters showing more than 2% sequence divergence while one species included three clusters. All 71 nymphalid caterpillars were identified to a species level by their sequence congruence to adult sequences. These caterpillars represented 16 species, and included Hamadryas julitta, an endemic species from the Yucatan Peninsula whose larval stages and host plant (Dalechampia schottii, also endemic to the Yucatan Peninsula) were previously unknown.
520 1 _ a| Conclusions/Significance: This investigation has revealed overlooked species in a well-studied museum collection of nymphalid butterflies and suggests that there is a substantial incidence of cryptic species that await full characterization. The utility of barcoding in the rapid identification of caterpillars also promises to accelerate the assembly of information on life histories, a particularly important advance for hyperdiverse tropical insect assemblages.
538 _ _ a| Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior
650 _ 4 a| Lepidópteros
650 _ 4 a| Mariposas
650 _ 4 a| Polillas
650 _ 4 a| Códigos de barras de ADN
650 _ 4 a| Ácido desoxirribonucléico
651 _ 4 a| Yucatán (Península) (México)
700 1 _ a| Prado Cuéllar, Blanca Rosa
700 1 _ a| Pozo, Carmen
c| Doctora
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Valdéz Moreno, Martha
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Hebert, Paul D. N.
e| coaut.
773 0 _
t| PLOS ONE
g| Vol. 6, no. 11, e27776 (November 2011), p. 1-11
x| 1932-6203
856 4 1 u| http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0027776
z| Artículo electrónico
856 _ _ u| http://aleph.ecosur.mx:8991/F?func=service&doc_library=CFS01&local_base=CFS01&doc_number=000035148&line_number=0001&func_code=DB_RECORDS&service_type=MEDIA
y| Artículo electrónico
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Febrero 2012
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
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Beyond the colours: discovering hidden diversity in the Nymphalidae of the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico through DNA barcoding
Prado Cuéllar, Blanca Rosa (autor)
Pozo, Carmen (autor)
Valdéz Moreno, Martha (autor)
Hebert, Paul D. N. (autor)
Contenido en: PLOS ONE. Vol. 6, no. 11, e27776 (November 2011), p. 1-11. ISSN: 1932-6203
No. de sistema: 35148
Tipo: Artículo
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"Background: Recent studies have demonstrated the utility of DNA barcoding in the discovery of overlooked species and in the connection of immature and adult stages. In this study, we use DNA barcoding to examine diversity patterns in 121 species of Nymphalidae from the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. Our results suggest the presence of cryptic species in 8 of these 121 taxa. As well, the reference database derived from the analysis of adult specimens allowed the identification of nymphalid caterpillars providing new details on host plant use. Methodology/Principal Findings: We gathered DNA barcode sequences from 857 adult Nymphalidae representing 121 different species. This total includes four species (Adelpha iphiclus, Adelpha malea, Hamadryas iphtime and Taygetis laches) that were initially overlooked because of their close morphological similarity to other species. The barcode results showed that each of the 121 species possessed a diagnostic array of barcode sequences. In addition, there was evidence of cryptic taxa; seven species included two barcode clusters showing more than 2% sequence divergence while one species included three clusters. All 71 nymphalid caterpillars were identified to a species level by their sequence congruence to adult sequences. These caterpillars represented 16 species, and included Hamadryas julitta, an endemic species from the Yucatan Peninsula whose larval stages and host plant (Dalechampia schottii, also endemic to the Yucatan Peninsula) were previously unknown."

"Conclusions/Significance: This investigation has revealed overlooked species in a well-studied museum collection of nymphalid butterflies and suggests that there is a substantial incidence of cryptic species that await full characterization. The utility of barcoding in the rapid identification of caterpillars also promises to accelerate the assembly of information on life histories, a particularly important advance for hyperdiverse tropical insect assemblages."


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