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No. de sistema: 000035752

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 190412m20191999xx^^r^p^o^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx---
044 _ _ a| xx
100 1 _ a| León Cortés, Jorge Leonel
c| Doctor
e| autor
245 1 0 a| Health reform in Mexico
b| governance and potential outcomes
506 _ _ a| Acceso en línea sin restricciones
520 1 _ a| Adopting key mechanisms to restructure public policy in developing countries is a crucial political task. The strengthening of infrastructure of health services, care quality, monitoring and population health; all might contribute to assuring the functionality of a national system for health monitoring and care. Over the last decades, the Mexican government has launched wide-ranging political reforms aiming to overcome socioeconomic and environmental problems, namely health, education, finances, energy and pension. The proposed (but yet not implemented) health reform in Mexico during E. Peña Nieto’s administration (2012–2018) pretended an adjustment in Article 4 of the Mexican Constitution to compact medical care and reduce the State’s responsibility to a provision of minimum health packages for the population. Here we use a simple analytical model to describe and interprete the concepts of context, process, actors and content and the outcome of three of the most important resulting components of this intended reform i.e. universality, basic packages, and ‘outsourcing’. In light of the start of the Mexico’s new federal administration, we argue that, if not properly defined by all actors, the implementation of such structural health reform in Mexico would precipitate a model of private/public association exacerbating a crisis of political representation, human rights, justice and governance.
530 _ _ a| Disponible en línea
533 _ _ a| Reproducción electrónica en formato PDF
538 _ _ a| Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior
650 _ 4 a| Reforma de la atención de salud
650 _ 4 a| Seguridad social
650 _ 4 a| Política de salud
650 _ 4 a| Política pública
651 _ 4 a| México
700 1 _ a| Leal Fernández, Gustavo
c| Dr.
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Sánchez Pérez, Héctor Javier
d| 1960-
e| autor
773 0 _
t| International Journal for Equity in Health
g| Vol. 18, no. 30 (2019), p. 1-6
x| 1475-9276
856 4 1 u| https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6367748/
z| Artículo electrónico
856 _ _ u| http://aleph.ecosur.mx:8991/F?func=service&doc_library=CFS01&local_base=CFS01&doc_number=000035752&line_number=0001&func_code=DB_RECORDS&service_type=MEDIA
y| Artículo electrónico
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Abril 2019
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
906 _ _ a| Producción Académica ECOSUR
LNG eng
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Health reform in Mexico: governance and potential outcomes
León Cortés, Jorge Leonel (autor)
Leal Fernández, Gustavo (autor)
Sánchez Pérez, Héctor Javier, 1960- (autor)
Nota: Disponible en línea
Acceso en línea sin restricciones
Contenido en: International Journal for Equity in Health. Vol. 18, no. 30 (2019), p. 1-6. ISSN: 1475-9276
No. de sistema: 35752
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
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Inglés

"Adopting key mechanisms to restructure public policy in developing countries is a crucial political task. The strengthening of infrastructure of health services, care quality, monitoring and population health; all might contribute to assuring the functionality of a national system for health monitoring and care. Over the last decades, the Mexican government has launched wide-ranging political reforms aiming to overcome socioeconomic and environmental problems, namely health, education, finances, energy and pension. The proposed (but yet not implemented) health reform in Mexico during E. Peña Nieto’s administration (2012–2018) pretended an adjustment in Article 4 of the Mexican Constitution to compact medical care and reduce the State’s responsibility to a provision of minimum health packages for the population. Here we use a simple analytical model to describe and interprete the concepts of context, process, actors and content and the outcome of three of the most important resulting components of this intended reform i.e. universality, basic packages, and ‘outsourcing’. In light of the start of the Mexico’s new federal administration, we argue that, if not properly defined by all actors, the implementation of such structural health reform in Mexico would precipitate a model of private/public association exacerbating a crisis of political representation, human rights, justice and governance."


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