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No. de sistema: 000037696

LDR _ _ 00000naa^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 030912s2006^^^^nyu^^^^fr^^^^z000^0^eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-ca
044 _ _ a| mx
100 1 _ a| Rivera Castañeda, Andrómeda Mariana
e| autora
245 1 0 a| Forest fragmentation and its effects on the feeding ecology of black howlers (Alouatta pigra) from the Calakmul area in Mexico
500 _ _ a| Para consultar el capítulo impreso véase el libro con la clasificación AC 599.809728 N4, en SIBE-San Cristóbal
506 _ _ a| Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
520 1 _ a| Information on food selection and feeding habits is critical for species conservation, particularly in the context of forest landscapes heavily transformed by human activities. In this study, we examined the degree to which A. pigra feeding habits differed between two sites in the conserved forest of the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve (CBR) and two forest fragments outside the reserve, and how monkeys select the trees on which they feed. Our results suggest that howlers tended to exploit a smaller set of fruit and leaf species in the conserved sites, whereas their diet was more diverse in the fragments. This can be explained probably by the role, at CBR, of Ficus sp. in howlers’ diet, as it was highly selected and represented half of all feeding events.
520 1 _ a| Chesson’s electivity index showed that howlers in fragments selected 12 of the 16 species used for feeding; while in CBR, they selected 9 of the 10 species used for feeding. At both types of forests, feeding trees were taller and were greater in diameter than non-feeding trees. Trees exploited by howlers for feeding have commercial dimensions and most of these species are commercially logged. As a result, in fragments and logged forests, howlers have to face the lack of continuity in the canopy and the loss of many vital trees for feeding. We expect howler monkeys to survive in fragmented sites if tree species important in their diet are conserved.
530 _ _ a| Disponible en línea
533 _ _ a| Reproducción electrónica en formato PDF
538 _ _ a| Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior
650 _ 4 a| Aullador negro
650 _ 4 a| Nutrición animal
650 _ 4 a| Fragmentación de hábitats
650 _ 4 a| Explotación forestal
651 _ 4 a| Reserva de la Biosfera Calakmul (Campeche, México)
700 1 _ a| Calmé, Sophie
c| Doctora
e| autora
773 0 _
t| New perspectives in the study of mesoamerican primates: distribution, ecology, behavior, and conservation / edited by Alejandro Estrada, Paul A. Garber, Mary McDonald Pavelka, LeAndra Luecke
d| New York, New York, United States : Springer Science+Business Media, c2006
g| páginas 189-213
z| 0-387-25854-X :: 978-0-387-25854-6
900 _ _ a| Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Septiembre 2010
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Calakmul
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
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*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Forest fragmentation and its effects on the feeding ecology of black howlers (Alouatta pigra) from the Calakmul area in Mexico
Rivera Castañeda, Andrómeda Mariana (autora)
Calmé, Sophie (autora)
Nota: Para consultar el capítulo impreso véase el libro con la clasificación AC 599.809728 N4, en SIBE-San Cristóbal.
Nota: Disponible en línea
Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
Contenido en: New perspectives in the study of mesoamerican primates: distribution, ecology, behavior, and conservation / edited by Alejandro Estrada, Paul A. Garber, Mary McDonald Pavelka, LeAndra Luecke. New York, New York, United States : Springer Science+Business Media, c2006. páginas 189-213. ISBN: 0-387-25854-X :: 978-0-387-25854-6
Bibliotecas:
San Cristóbal
No. de sistema: 37696
Tipo: Capítulo de libro
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Inglés

"Information on food selection and feeding habits is critical for species conservation, particularly in the context of forest landscapes heavily transformed by human activities. In this study, we examined the degree to which A. pigra feeding habits differed between two sites in the conserved forest of the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve (CBR) and two forest fragments outside the reserve, and how monkeys select the trees on which they feed. Our results suggest that howlers tended to exploit a smaller set of fruit and leaf species in the conserved sites, whereas their diet was more diverse in the fragments. This can be explained probably by the role, at CBR, of Ficus sp. in howlers’ diet, as it was highly selected and represented half of all feeding events."

"Chesson’s electivity index showed that howlers in fragments selected 12 of the 16 species used for feeding; while in CBR, they selected 9 of the 10 species used for feeding. At both types of forests, feeding trees were taller and were greater in diameter than non-feeding trees. Trees exploited by howlers for feeding have commercial dimensions and most of these species are commercially logged. As a result, in fragments and logged forests, howlers have to face the lack of continuity in the canopy and the loss of many vital trees for feeding. We expect howler monkeys to survive in fragmented sites if tree species important in their diet are conserved."

SIBE San Cristóbal
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37696-20
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Artículos de investigación ECOSUR

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