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No. de sistema: 000039207

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 090624m20089999ne^ur^p^^^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
044 _ _ a| ne
245 0 0 a| Senescence of Manilkara zapota trees and implications for large frugivorous birds in the Southern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
520 1 _ a| It has long been established that mature forests are mosaics of patches in different development phases but it has seldom explicitly been taken into account in ecological studies. We demonstrate here that these development phases, which are related to the population dynamics of trees, play an important role in the distribution of fauna based on observations on frugivorous birds. In an area close to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve in Mexico, we studied the abundance of large forest bird species in relation to forest development phases, with a methodology that seems promising for ecological diagnosis and prognosis in forest management planning. Fine-scale forest mapping and bird counts were carried out in two block-transects of 40 m × 3000 m. Tree sampling in a sub-transect was used to generate population characteristics of trees. Large bird species preferred mature or senescent forest patches, whereas relatively young, growing forest patches were avoided. Important large tree species such as Manilkara zapota, Thouinia paucidentata, Guaiacum sanctum and Esenbeckia pentaphylla, characteristic of older forest patches, showed skewed size distributions indicating stress or overexploitation. The population of M. zapota, a key fruiting species that accounted for 26.5% of the total woody biomass, was most heavily affected by stress. A future collapse in the population of M. zapota, a decrease of the total area of older forest, and a decline in the abundance of large birds is likely if stress on the system continues at this level.
650 _ 4 a| Bosques
650 _ 4 a| Manilkara zapota
650 _ 4 a| Aves
650 _ 4 a| Biogeografía
650 _ 4 a| Evaluación ecológica (Biología)
651 _ 4 a| Reserva de la Biosfera Calakmul (Campeche, México)
651 _ 4 a| Yucatán (Península) (México)
700 1 _ a| Antonius Weteringsa, Martinus Jacobus
700 1 _ a| Weterings Schoncka, Suzanne Maria
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Vester, Henricus F. M.
c| Dr.
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Calmé, Sophie
c| Doctora
e| coaut.
773 0 _
t| Forest Ecology and Management
g| Vol. 256, no. 9 (October 2008), p. 1604-1611
x| 0378-1127
902 _ _ a| GOG/Brenda
904 _ _ a| Junio 2009
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
905 _ _ a| CRIIS
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
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Senescence of Manilkara zapota trees and implications for large frugivorous birds in the Southern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
Antonius Weteringsa, Martinus Jacobus (autor)
Weterings Schoncka, Suzanne Maria (autor)
Vester, Henricus F. M. (autor)
Calmé, Sophie (autor)
Contenido en: Forest Ecology and Management. Vol. 256, no. 9 (October 2008), p. 1604-1611. ISSN: 0378-1127
No. de sistema: 39207
Tipo: Artículo


Inglés

"It has long been established that mature forests are mosaics of patches in different development phases but it has seldom explicitly been taken into account in ecological studies. We demonstrate here that these development phases, which are related to the population dynamics of trees, play an important role in the distribution of fauna based on observations on frugivorous birds. In an area close to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve in Mexico, we studied the abundance of large forest bird species in relation to forest development phases, with a methodology that seems promising for ecological diagnosis and prognosis in forest management planning. Fine-scale forest mapping and bird counts were carried out in two block-transects of 40 m × 3000 m. Tree sampling in a sub-transect was used to generate population characteristics of trees. Large bird species preferred mature or senescent forest patches, whereas relatively young, growing forest patches were avoided. Important large tree species such as Manilkara zapota, Thouinia paucidentata, Guaiacum sanctum and Esenbeckia pentaphylla, characteristic of older forest patches, showed skewed size distributions indicating stress or overexploitation. The population of M. zapota, a key fruiting species that accounted for 26.5% of the total woody biomass, was most heavily affected by stress. A future collapse in the population of M. zapota, a decrease of the total area of older forest, and a decline in the abundance of large birds is likely if stress on the system continues at this level."