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No. de sistema: 000041983

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^z^^^4500
008 _ _ 170316m20179999xx^^r^p^^^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
044 _ _ a| xx
245 0 0 a| Physiological state influences the antennal response of Anastrepha obliqua to male and host volatiles
506 _ _ a| Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
520 1 _ a| The sexual and host-related behaviours of the fruit fly Anastrepha obliqua Macquart (Diptera: Tephritidae) aremediated by volatile compounds. However, whether the physiological state of this species affects its antennal and behavioural responses to semiochemicals is unknown. The effects of age, mating status, diet and the topical application of methoprene, a Juvenile hormone analogue (JHA), on the antennal sensitivity of this tephritid fruit fly species to selected male [(Z)-3-nonenol] and host fruit volatiles (ethyl benzoate, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl butyrate and trans-β-ocimene) are investigated using electroantennography (EAG). Overall, (Z)-3-nonenol and ethyl benzoate elicit the highest EAG responses in both sexes. Flies of both sexes aged 1, 5 and 10 days old show higher EAG responses to the tested compounds compared with flies aged 20 days old. Virgin females and males show higher EAG responses to volatile compounds than mated flies. Females and males fed with sugar plus protein show higher antennal responses to volatiles compared with flies fed sugar or protein alone. Flies of both sexes treated with methoprene show higher antennal responses than flies treated with acetone (control). These results suggest that the peripheral olfactory system in A. obliqua is modulated by the physiological state of the flies.
650 _ 4 a| Anastrepha obliqua
650 _ 4 a| Moscas de la fruta
650 _ 4 a| Similares a las hormonas juveniles
650 _ 4 a| Semioquímicos
700 1 _ a| Reyes Hernández, Humberto
n| 24779339800
700 1 _ a| Malo Rivera, Edi Álvaro
c| Doctor
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Toledo, Jorge
c| Dr.
e| coaut.
n| 7005977045
700 1 _ a| Cruz Esteban, Samuel
e| coaut.
n| 57190046428
700 1 _ a| Rojas, Julio C.
e| coaut.
773 0 _
t| Physiological Entomology
g| Vol. 42, no. 1 (March 2017), p. 17–25
x| 1365-3032
900 _ _ a| Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Marzo 2017
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
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*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Physiological state influences the antennal response of Anastrepha obliqua to male and host volatiles
Reyes Hernández, Humberto (autor)
Malo Rivera, Edi Álvaro (autor)
Toledo, Jorge (autor)
Cruz Esteban, Samuel (autor)
Rojas, Julio C. (autor)
Nota: Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
Contenido en: Physiological Entomology. Vol. 42, no. 1 (March 2017), p. 17–25. ISSN: 1365-3032
No. de sistema: 41983
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
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Inglés

"The sexual and host-related behaviours of the fruit fly Anastrepha obliqua Macquart (Diptera: Tephritidae) aremediated by volatile compounds. However, whether the physiological state of this species affects its antennal and behavioural responses to semiochemicals is unknown. The effects of age, mating status, diet and the topical application of methoprene, a Juvenile hormone analogue (JHA), on the antennal sensitivity of this tephritid fruit fly species to selected male [(Z)-3-nonenol] and host fruit volatiles (ethyl benzoate, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl butyrate and trans-β-ocimene) are investigated using electroantennography (EAG). Overall, (Z)-3-nonenol and ethyl benzoate elicit the highest EAG responses in both sexes. Flies of both sexes aged 1, 5 and 10 days old show higher EAG responses to the tested compounds compared with flies aged 20 days old. Virgin females and males show higher EAG responses to volatile compounds than mated flies. Females and males fed with sugar plus protein show higher antennal responses to volatiles compared with flies fed sugar or protein alone. Flies of both sexes treated with methoprene show higher antennal responses than flies treated with acetone (control). These results suggest that the peripheral olfactory system in A. obliqua is modulated by the physiological state of the flies."