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No. de sistema: 000051776

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^2200000za^4500
008 _ _ 151030m20159999xx^br^p^^^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-cp
044 _ _ a| wau
245 0 0 a| Microsite determinants of variability in seedling and cutting establishment in tropical forest restoration plantations
506 _ _ a| Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
520 1 _ a| Plantations are frequently established on abandoned pasture lands to speed forest recovery. This strategy requires matching a tree species mix with the prevailing microenvironmental conditions. In four degraded pastures of the Mexican Lacandon rainforest, we planted 2,400 trees of 6 species (Guazuma ulmifolia, Inga vera, Ochroma pyramidale, Trichospermum mexicanum, Bursera simaruba, and Spondias mombin) to (1) test survival, initial growth, and establishment costs; (2) evaluate whether vegetative cuttings outperform direct seeding or transplants of nursery-raised seedlings; (3) determine tree response to herbaceous dominance and soil compaction; and (4) scrutinize the results' consistency across sites and sampling scales of tree–microenvironment interactions (individual tree vs. averaged plot responses). After 2 years, overall survival and growth rates were high for 2 of 3 nursery-raised species. Contrary to expectations, all seedlings outperformed the cuttings while direct seeding resulted in a cost-effective option of intermediate efficacy. The impact of soil resistance to root penetration on tree biomass accumulation was species dependent while bulk density was not relevant. Soil-covering, herbaceous vegetation accelerated growth in 3 of 4 tested species during the dry season. At this initial stage of forest restoration in abandoned pastures, Guazuma and Trichospermum were the most restoration-effective species. Costs can be reduced by using direct-seeding Inga and avoiding weeding during the dry season. Finally, our results demonstrate how species selection trials can be misleading due to site variations in tree response and to sampling scales that fail to account for small-scale environmental heterogeneity. We recommend ways to improve the design of restoration trials.
650 _ 4 a| Plantaciones forestales
650 _ 4 a| Restauración forestal
650 _ 4 a| Biomasa forestal
650 _ 4 a| Adaptación de las plantas
650 _ 4 a| Potreros
651 _ 4 a| Maravilla Tenejapa (Chiapas, México)
700 1 _ a| Douterlungne, David
n| 26631820900
700 1 _ a| Ferguson, Bruce G.
c| Dr.
d| 1967-
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Siddique, Ilyas
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Soto Pinto, Lorena
c| Doctora
d| 1958-
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Jiménez Ferrer, Guillermo
c| Dr.
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Gavito, Mayra E.
e| coaut.
n| 6601998887
773 0 _
t| Restoration Ecology
g| Vol. 23, no. 6 (November 2015), p. 861-871
x| 1526-100X
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Octubre 2015
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
905 _ _ a| Servibosques
906 _ _ a| Producción Académica ECOSUR
LNG eng
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Microsite determinants of variability in seedling and cutting establishment in tropical forest restoration plantations
Douterlungne, David (autor)
Ferguson, Bruce G., 1967- (autor)
Siddique, Ilyas (autor)
Soto Pinto, Lorena, 1958- (autor)
Jiménez Ferrer, Guillermo (autor)
Gavito, Mayra E. (autor)
Nota: Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
Contenido en: Restoration Ecology. Vol. 23, no. 6 (November 2015), p. 861-871. ISSN: 1526-100X
No. de sistema: 51776
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
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Inglés

"Plantations are frequently established on abandoned pasture lands to speed forest recovery. This strategy requires matching a tree species mix with the prevailing microenvironmental conditions. In four degraded pastures of the Mexican Lacandon rainforest, we planted 2,400 trees of 6 species (Guazuma ulmifolia, Inga vera, Ochroma pyramidale, Trichospermum mexicanum, Bursera simaruba, and Spondias mombin) to (1) test survival, initial growth, and establishment costs; (2) evaluate whether vegetative cuttings outperform direct seeding or transplants of nursery-raised seedlings; (3) determine tree response to herbaceous dominance and soil compaction; and (4) scrutinize the results' consistency across sites and sampling scales of tree–microenvironment interactions (individual tree vs. averaged plot responses). After 2 years, overall survival and growth rates were high for 2 of 3 nursery-raised species. Contrary to expectations, all seedlings outperformed the cuttings while direct seeding resulted in a cost-effective option of intermediate efficacy. The impact of soil resistance to root penetration on tree biomass accumulation was species dependent while bulk density was not relevant. Soil-covering, herbaceous vegetation accelerated growth in 3 of 4 tested species during the dry season. At this initial stage of forest restoration in abandoned pastures, Guazuma and Trichospermum were the most restoration-effective species. Costs can be reduced by using direct-seeding Inga and avoiding weeding during the dry season. Finally, our results demonstrate how species selection trials can be misleading due to site variations in tree response and to sampling scales that fail to account for small-scale environmental heterogeneity. We recommend ways to improve the design of restoration trials."