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No. de sistema: 000051800

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^2200000za^4500
008 _ _ 160330m20169999xx^br^p^^^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-cp
044 _ _ a| xx
245 0 0 a| Carambola cultivar, fruit ripeness, and damage by conspecific larvae influence the host-related behaviors of anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: tephritidae)
506 _ _ a| Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
520 1 _ a| In this study, we investigated the influence of cultivar type, fruit ripeness, and damage by conspecific larvae on the attraction of Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart) (Diptera: Tephritidae) to and oviposition on carambola fruit (Averroha carambola L.). The attraction of both sexes of A. obliqua to fruit of different quality was evaluated through cage experiments in the field, and the oviposition preferences of mated females were examined in laboratory tests. Both sexes, mated or virgin, were more attracted to the "Maha" fruit than to the "Golden Star" fruit, and the females oviposited more frequently on the Maha cultivar than the Golden Star cultivar. Both sexes were more attracted to ripe and half-ripe Maha fruits than to mature green fruit, and although females did not show a preference for ovipositing on half-ripe or ripe fruits, they did not oviposit on mature green fruits. Males did not show a preference for the volatiles from uninfested, artificially damaged, or infested Maha fruits, but females were more attracted to uninfested fruits than to artificially damaged and infested Maha fruits. Furthermore, females preferred to oviposit on uninfested fruits compared with artificially damaged fruit, and they did not oviposit on infested fruits.
650 _ 4 a| Anastrepha obliqua
650 _ 4 a| Averrhoa carambola
650 _ 4 a| Huéspedes
650 _ 4 a| Oviposición
650 _ 4 a| Daños a las plantas
651 _ 4 a| El Refugio, Tapachula (Chiapas, México)
700 1 _ a| López Ley, Jorge Ulises
n| 57190863802
700 1 _ a| Toledo, Jorge
c| Dr.
e| coaut.
n| 7005977045
700 1 _ a| Malo Rivera, Edi Álvaro
c| Doctor
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Gómez Ruiz, Jaime
e| coaut.
n| 55993765600
700 1 _ a| Santiesteban Hernández, Antonio
e| coaut.
700 1 _ a| Rojas, Julio C.
e| coaut.
773 0 _
t| Journal of Economic Entomology
g| Vol. 109, no. 1 (Feb. 2016), p. 154-160
x| 0022-0493
901 _ _ a| Artículo con arbitraje
902 _ _ a| GOG / MM
904 _ _ a| Marzo 2016
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Artfrosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
Cerrar
Carambola cultivar, fruit ripeness, and damage by conspecific larvae influence the host-related behaviors of anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: tephritidae)
López Ley, Jorge Ulises (autor)
Toledo, Jorge (autor)
Malo Rivera, Edi Álvaro (autor)
Gómez Ruiz, Jaime (autor)
Santiesteban Hernández, Antonio (autor)
Rojas, Julio C. (autor)
Nota: Acceso electrónico sólo para usuarios de ECOSUR
Contenido en: Journal of Economic Entomology. Vol. 109, no. 1 (Feb. 2016), p. 154-160. ISSN: 0022-0493
No. de sistema: 51800
Tipo: - Artículo con arbitraje
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Inglés

"In this study, we investigated the influence of cultivar type, fruit ripeness, and damage by conspecific larvae on the attraction of Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart) (Diptera: Tephritidae) to and oviposition on carambola fruit (Averroha carambola L.). The attraction of both sexes of A. obliqua to fruit of different quality was evaluated through cage experiments in the field, and the oviposition preferences of mated females were examined in laboratory tests. Both sexes, mated or virgin, were more attracted to the "Maha" fruit than to the "Golden Star" fruit, and the females oviposited more frequently on the Maha cultivar than the Golden Star cultivar. Both sexes were more attracted to ripe and half-ripe Maha fruits than to mature green fruit, and although females did not show a preference for ovipositing on half-ripe or ripe fruits, they did not oviposit on mature green fruits. Males did not show a preference for the volatiles from uninfested, artificially damaged, or infested Maha fruits, but females were more attracted to uninfested fruits than to artificially damaged and infested Maha fruits. Furthermore, females preferred to oviposit on uninfested fruits compared with artificially damaged fruit, and they did not oviposit on infested fruits."