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No. de sistema: 000060445

LDR _ _ 00000nab^^22^^^^^za^4500
008 _ _ 200518m20199999xx^^r^p^o^^^^z0^^^a0eng^d
040 _ _ a| ECO
c| ECO
043 _ _ a| n-mx-yu
044 _ _ a| xx
245 0 0 a| Water quality in the eastern karst region of the Yucatan Peninsula
b| nutrients and stable nitrogen isotopes in turtle grass, Thalassia testudinum
506 _ _ a| Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
520 1 _ a| Water quality in the Mexican Caribbean is affected by increases in tourism infrastructure and poor wastewater treatment. Additionally, karst geomorphology facilitates the infiltration of organic matter to subterranean water and coastal fresh water that originates from submarine groundwater discharges (SGDs), altering the environment. The tourism infrastructure grows at different rates along the Caribbean coast, characterizing zones with diverse levels of tourism impact. The aim of this work was to measure nutrient concentrations in superficial coastal water and fresh water to evaluate the water quality through different zones along a gradient from intermediate- (Riviera Maya) to low-tourism (Costa Maya) development regions. Furthermore, this study aimed to compare the measured nutrient concentrations with the Mexican ecological criteria of water quality 001/89 (CE-CCA-001/89), detect possible contributions by SGDs, and determine whether the nitrogen (N) sources are anthropogenic using stable nitrogen isotopes in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum. According to the results, nutrient concentrations (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and orthophosphate) differed significantly between the Riviera Maya and Costa Maya (P= 0.0001). Sites such as Shambala, Chávez, Tankah, Mahahual 2, Tulum, Akumal, and Xahuayxol exceeded the upper levels set by the CE-CCA-001/89. Tankah, Shambala, and Chávez were influenced by SGDs. The nitrogen isotope ratio in Akumal and Tulum coast water shows that they are under N loading derived to the sewage percentage ofδ¹5N in Akumal, Tulum, and Mahahual, showing that these sites suffer N loading due to sewage. Our study recommends continuous monitoring and coastal characterization to detect SGD and to regulate, treat, and dispose of sewage.
530 _ _ a| Disponible en línea
533 _ _ a| Reproducción electrónica en formato PDF
538 _ _ a| Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior
650 _ 4 a| Thalassia testudinum
650 _ 4 a| Pastos marinos
650 _ 4 a| Calidad del agua
650 _ 4 a| Aguas residuales
650 _ 4 a| Contaminación marina
650 _ 4 a| Desarrollo turístico
651 _ 4 a| Yucatán (Península) (México)
700 1 _ a| Camacho Cruz, Karla Andrea
e| autora
700 1 _ a| Ortíz Hernández, Ma. Concepción
e| autora
700 1 _ a| Sánchez, Alberto
e| autor
700 1 _ a| Carrillo Bibriezca, Laura Elena
e| autora
700 1 _ a| De Jesús Navarrete, Alberto
c| Dr.
e| autor
n| 6602620188
773 0 _
t| Environmental Science and Pollution Research
g| Volumen 27 (2020), p. 15967-15983
x| 0944-1344
900 _ _ a| Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
902 _ _ a| BG / MM
904 _ _ a| Mayo 2020
905 _ _ a| Artecosur
905 _ _ a| Biblioelectrónica
LNG eng
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*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Water quality in the eastern karst region of the Yucatan Peninsula: nutrients and stable nitrogen isotopes in turtle grass, Thalassia testudinum
Camacho Cruz, Karla Andrea (autora)
Ortíz Hernández, Ma. Concepción (autora)
Sánchez, Alberto (autor)
Carrillo Bibriezca, Laura Elena (autora)
De Jesús Navarrete, Alberto (autor)
Nota: Disponible en línea
Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso
Contenido en: Environmental Science and Pollution Research. Volumen 27 (2020), p. 15967-15983. ISSN: 0944-1344
No. de sistema: 60445
Tipo: Artículo
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Inglés

"Water quality in the Mexican Caribbean is affected by increases in tourism infrastructure and poor wastewater treatment. Additionally, karst geomorphology facilitates the infiltration of organic matter to subterranean water and coastal fresh water that originates from submarine groundwater discharges (SGDs), altering the environment. The tourism infrastructure grows at different rates along the Caribbean coast, characterizing zones with diverse levels of tourism impact. The aim of this work was to measure nutrient concentrations in superficial coastal water and fresh water to evaluate the water quality through different zones along a gradient from intermediate- (Riviera Maya) to low-tourism (Costa Maya) development regions. Furthermore, this study aimed to compare the measured nutrient concentrations with the Mexican ecological criteria of water quality 001/89 (CE-CCA-001/89), detect possible contributions by SGDs, and determine whether the nitrogen (N) sources are anthropogenic using stable nitrogen isotopes in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum. According to the results, nutrient concentrations (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and orthophosphate) differed significantly between the Riviera Maya and Costa Maya (P= 0.0001). Sites such as Shambala, Chávez, Tankah, Mahahual 2, Tulum, Akumal, and Xahuayxol exceeded the upper levels set by the CE-CCA-001/89. Tankah, Shambala, and Chávez were influenced by SGDs. The nitrogen isotope ratio in Akumal and Tulum coast water shows that they are under N loading derived to the sewage percentage ofδ¹5N in Akumal, Tulum, and Mahahual, showing that these sites suffer N loading due to sewage. Our study recommends continuous monitoring and coastal characterization to detect SGD and to regulate, treat, and dispose of sewage."


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