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2 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Armenta Montero, Samaria
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Detecting and monitoring forest disturbance from selective logging is necessary to develop effective strategies and polices that conserve tropical forests and mitigate climate change. We assessed the potential of using the remote sensing tool, CLASlite forest monitoring system, to detect disturbance from timber harvesting in four community forests (ejidos) of the Selva Maya on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Selective logging impacts (e.g. felling gaps, skid trails, logging roads and log landings) were mapped using GPS in the 2014 annual cutting areas (ACAs) of each ejido. We processed and analyzed two pre-harvest Landsat images (2001 and 2013) and one post-harvest image (November 2014) with the CLASlite system, producing maps of degraded, deforested and unlogged areas in each ACA. Based on reference points of disturbed (felling and skidding), deforested (log landings and roads) and unlogged areas in each ACA, we applied accuracy assessments which showed very low overall accuracies (<19.1%). Selective logging impacts, mainly from log landings and new logging road construction, were detected in only one ejido which had the highest logging intensity (7 m³ ha–¹).


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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Natural forest management in the tropics is often impeded by scarcity of advanced regeneration of commercial species. To supplement natural regeneration in a forest managed by a community in the Selva Maya of Mexico, nursery-grown Swietenia macrophylla seedlings were planted in multiple-tree felling gaps, known as bosquetes. Remnant trees are often left standing in gaps for cultural and economic reasons or due to their official protected status. We focus on these purposefully retained trees and their impacts on planted seedlings. Sampled bosquetes were 400–1800 m², of which remnant trees covered a mean of 29%. Seedling height growth rates over the first 18 months after out-planting more than doubled with increased canopy openness from 0.09 m year-¹ under medium cover to 0.22 m year-¹ in full sun. Liana infestations and shoot tip damage were most frequent on seedlings in the open, but, contrary to our expectations, height growth rates were 0.14 m year-¹ faster for liana-infested seedlings than non-infested and did not differ between damaged and undamaged seedlings. Apparently the more rapid height growth of well-illuminated seedlings more than compensated for the effects of lianas or shoot tip damage. Despite the abundance of remnant trees and their negative effects on seedling growth, enrichment planting in bosquetes has potential for community-based natural forest management in the tropics in supplementing natural regeneration of commercial species. One obvious recommendation is to leave fewer remnant trees, especially those of commercial species that are non-merchantable due to stem defects and trees retained for no apparent reason, which together constituted half of the remnant crown cover in the sampled bosquetes. Finally, given the rapid growth of lianas and understory palms in large canopy gaps, at least the most vigorous of the planted seedlings should be tended for at least two years.