Términos relacionados

9 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Bichier, Peter
  • «
  • 1 de 1
  • »
1.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Agroecological pest management in the city: experiences from California and Chiapas
Morales, H. ; Ferguson, Bruce G. (coaut.) (1967-) ; Marín, Linda E. (coaut.) ; Gutiérrez Navarrete, Dario (coaut.) ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Sustainability Vol. 10, no. 6, 2068 (June 2018) ISSN: 2071-1050
PDF PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Urban gardens are a prominent part of agricultural systems, providing food security and access within cities; however, we still lack sufficient knowledge and general principles about how to manage pests in urban agroecosystems in distinct regions. We surveyed natural enemies (ladybeetles and parasitoids) and conducted sentinel pest removal experiments to explore local management factors and landscape characteristics that influence the provisioning of pest control services in California, USA, and Chiapas, Mexico. We worked in 29 gardens across the two locations. In each location, we collected data on garden vegetation, floral availability, ground cover management, and the percentage of natural, urban, and agricultural land cover in the surrounding landscape. We sampled ladybeetles, Chalcidoidea, and Ichneumonoidea parasitoids with sticky traps, and monitored the removal of three different pest species. Ladybeetle abundance did not differ between locations; abundance decreased with garden size and with tree cover and increased with herbaceous richness, floral abundance, and barren land cover. Chalcicoidea and Ichneumonoidea parasitoids were more abundant in Chiapas.

Chalcicoidea abundance decreased with herbaceous richness and with urban cover. Ichneumonoidea abundance increased with mulch and bare ground cover, garden size, garden age, and with agriculture land cover but decreased with tree richness and urban cover. Predators removed between 15–100% of sentinel prey within 24 h but prey removal was greater in California. Generally, prey removal increased with vegetation diversity, floral abundance, mulch cover, and urban land cover, but declined with vegetation cover and bare ground. Although some factors had consistent effects on natural enemies and pest control in the two locations, many did not; thus, we still need more comparative work to further develop our understanding of general principles governing conservation biological control in urban settings.


2.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Epiphyte biodiversity in the coffee agricultural matrix: canopy stratification and distance from forest fragments
Moorhead, Leigh C. (autor) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (autora) ; Bichier, Peter (autor) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 24, no. 3 (June 2010), p. 737-746 ISSN: 0888-8892
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
49277-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

La calidad de la matriz agrícola afecta profundamente a la biodiversidad y la dispersión en áreas agrícolas. Los agroecosistemas cafetaleros con una vegetación compleja mantienen riqueza de especies a mayores distancias del bosque. Las epífitas colonizan el dosel de árboles y proporcionan recursos para aves e insectos y, por lo tanto, los efectos de la producción agrícola sobre las epífitas pueden afectar a otras especies. Comparamos la diversidad, composición, diversidad y estratificación vertical de epífitas en un fragmento de bosque y en dos fincas cafetaleras con diferente intensidad de manejo en el sur de México. También examinamos la distribución espacial de epífitas respecto al fragmento de bosque para evaluar la calidad de los dos tipos de matriz para la conservación de epífitas. Muestreamos las epífitas vasculares en un fragmento de bosque, una finca con sombra policultivo y una con sombra monocultivo a 100 m, 200 m y 400 m del bosque. La riqueza de epífitas y orquídeas fue mayor en el bosque que en el bosque que el monocultivo pero la riqueza fue similar en el bosque y el policultivo. La composición de especies de epífitas difirió con el tipo de hábitat, pero no con la distancia al bosque.

En el bosque, las epífitas se distribuyeron en el dosel de los árboles, pero en las fincas se distribuyeron principalmente sobre los troncos y ramas mayores. La riqueza y similitud de especies de epífitas disminuyeron con la distancia al fragmento de bosque en elmonocultivo, pero la riqueza y la similitud con las especies de bosque no declinaron con la distancia al bosque en el policultivo. Esto sugiere que el café policultivo tiene un mayor valor de conservación. En contraste, el café monocultivo probablemente es un hábitat vertedero para epífitas en dispersión desde los bosques. Las fincas cafetaleras difieren de los bosques en términos del hábitat que proporcionan y la composición de especies, por lo tanto la protección de fragmentos de bosque es esencial para la conservación de epífitas. Sin embargo, las fincas cafetaleras con vegetación compleja pueden contribuir a la conservación de epífitas mejor que otros usos de suelo en los paisajes agrícolas.

Resumen en inglés

Quality of the agricultural matrix profoundly affects biodiversity and dispersal in agricultural areas. Vegetatively complex coffee agroecosystemsmaintain species richness at larger distances from the forest. Epiphytes colonize canopy trees and provide resources for birds and insects and thus effects of agricultural production on epiphytes may affect other species. We compared diversity, composition, and vertical stratification of epiphytes in a forest fragment and in two coffee farms differing in management intensity in southern Mexico. We also examined spatial distribution of epiphytes with respect to the forest fragment to examine quality of the two agricultural matrix types for epiphyte conservation. We sampled vascular epiphytes in a forest fragment, a shade polyculture farm, and a shade monoculture farm at 100 m, 200 m, and 400 m from the forest. Epiphyte and orchid richness was greater in the forest than in the monoculture but richness was similar in the forest and polyculture farm.

Epiphyte species composition differed with habitat type, but not with distance from the forest. In the forest, epiphytes were distributed throughout tree canopies, but in the farms, epiphytes were primarily found on trunks and larger branches. Epiphyte richness and species similarity to forest species declined with distance from the forest fragment in the monoculture, but richness and similarity to forest species did not decline with distance from forest in the polyculture. This suggests polyculture coffee has greater conservation value. In contrast, monoculture coffee is likely a sink habitat for epiphytes dispersing from forests into coffee. Coffee farms differ from forests in terms of the habitat they provide and species composition, thus protecting forest fragments is essential for epiphyte conservation. Nonetheless, in agricultural landscapes, vegetatively complex coffee farms may contribute to conservation of epiphytes more than other agricultural land uses.


3.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Biodiversity coservation, yield, and alternative products in coffee agroecosystems in Sumatra, Indonesia
Philpott, Stacy M. ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Rice, Robert A. (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biodiversity and Conservation Vol. 17, no. 8 (July 2008), p. 1805-1820 ISSN: 0960-3115
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
46760-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Agroecology and conservation must overlap to protect biodiversity and farmer livelihoods. Coffee agroecosystems with complex shade canopies protect biodiversity. Yet, few have examined biodiversity in coffee agroecosystems in Asia relative to the Americas and many question whether coffee agroecosystems can play a similar role for conservation. We examined vegetation, ant and bird diversity, coffee yields and revenues, and harvest of alternative products in coffee farms and forests in SW Sumatra, Indonesia near Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park (BBS). BBS is among the last habitats for large mammals in Sumatra and >15,000 families illegally cultivate coffee inside of BBS. As a basis for informing management recommendations, we compared the conservation potential and economic outputs from farms inside and outside of BBS. Forests had higher canopy cover, canopy depth, tree height, epiphyte loads, and more emergent trees than coffee farms. Coffee farms inside BBS had more epiphytes and trees and fewer coffee plants than farms outside BBS. Tree, ant, and bird richness was significantly greater in forests than in coffee farms, and richness did not differ in coffee farms inside and outside of BBS. Species similarity of forest and coffee trees, ants, and birds was generally low (<50%). Surprisingly, farms inside the park were significantly older, but farm size, coffee yields, and revenues from coffee did not depend on farm location. Farmers outside BBS received higher prices for their coffee and also more often produced other crops in their coffee fields such that incentives could be created to draw illegal farmers out of the park. We also discuss these results with reference to similar work in Chiapas, Mexico to compare the relative contribution of coffee fields to conservation in the two continents, and discuss implications for working with farmers in Sumatra towards conservation plans incorporating sustainable coffee production.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Biodiversity loss in Latin American coffee landscapes: review of the evidence on ants, birds, and trees
Philpott, Stacy M. ; Arendt, Wayne J. (coaut.) ; Armbrecht, Inge (coaut.) ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Diestch, Thomas V. (coaut.) ; Gordon, Caleb (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Reynoso Santos, Roberto (coaut.) ; Soto Pinto, Lorena (coaut.) (1958-) ; Tejeda Cruz, César (coaut.) ; Williams Linera, Guadalupe (coaut.) ; Valenzuela González, Jorge Ernesto (coaut.) ; Zolotoff, José Manuel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 22, no. 5 (October 2008), p. 1093-1105 ISSN: 0888-8892
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
46889-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en español

Diversos estudios han documentado las pérdidas de biodiversidad debido a la intensificación del manejo de café (disminución de la riqueza y complejidad del dosel). Sin embargo, persisten preguntas sobre la sensibilidad relativa de diferentes taxa, especialistas de hábitat y grupos funcionales, y sí las implicaciones para la conservación de la biodiversidad varían entre regiones. Revisamos cuantitativamente los datos de estudios de biodiversidad de hormigas, aves y árboles en agroecosistemas de café para abordar las siguientes preguntas: ¿La riqueza de especies declina con la intensificación o con las características individuales de la vegetación?¿Hay pérdidas significativas de riqueza de especies en los sistemas cafetaleros en comparación con los bosques?¿Es mayor la pérdida en especies de bosque o en grupos funcionales particulares? y ¿Las aves o las hormigas son más afectadas por la intensificación? En los estudios revisados, la riqueza de hormigas y aves declinó con la intensificación del manejo y con los cambios de vegetación. La riqueza de especies de todas las hormigas y aves y la de especies de hormigas y aves de bosque fue menor en la mayoría de los agroecosistemas cafetaleros que en los bosques, pero el café rústico (cultivado bajo dosel de bosque nativo) sustentó la mayor pérdida de especies, y la pérdida de especies de hormigas, aves y árboles de bosque aumentó con la intensificación del manejo.

Las pérdidas de especies de hormigas y aves fueron similares, aunque las pérdidas de hormigas de bosque fueron más drásticas en el café rústico. La riqueza de especies de aves migratorias y de aves que forrajean en varios estratos de vegetación fueron menos afectadas por la intensificación que las especies residentes de dosel y de sotobosque. Las fincas rústicas protegieron más especies que otros sistemas cafetaleros, y la pérdida de especies dependió mayormente de la especialización de hábitat y de los atributos funcionales. Recomendamos que el bosque sea protegido, se promueva el café rústico y se restauren las fincas intensivas mediante el incremento de la densidad y riqueza de árboles nativos y permitiendo el crecimiento de epífitas. También recomendamos que las futuras investigaciones enfoquen las compensaciones potenciales entre la conservación de la biodiversidad y la forma de vida de los campesinos que producen café.

Resumen en inglés

Studies have documented biodiversity losses due to intensification of coffee management (reduction in canopy richness and complexity). Nevertheless, questions remain regarding relative sensitivity of different taxa, habitat specialists, and functional groups, and whether implications for biodiversity conservation vary across regions.We quantitatively reviewed data from ant, bird, and tree biodiversity studies in coffee agroecosystems to address the following questions: Does species richness decline with intensification or with individual vegetation characteristics? Are there significant losses of species richness in coffee-management systems compared with forests? Is species loss greater for forest species or for particular functional groups?and Are ants or birds more strongly affected by intensification? Across studies, ant and bird richness declined with management intensification and with changes in vegetation. Species richness of all ants and birds and of forest ant and bird species was lower in most coffee agroecosystems than in forests, but rustic coffee (grown under native forest canopies) had equal or greater ant and bird richness than nearby forests.

Sun coffee(grown without canopy trees) sustained the highest species losses, and species loss of forest ant, bird, and tree species increased with management intensity. Losses of ant and bird species were similar, although losses of forest ants were more drastic in rustic coffee. Richness of migratory birds and of birds that forage across vegetation strata was less affected by intensification than richness of resident, canopy, and understory bird species. Rustic farms protected more species than other coffee systems, and loss of species depended greatly on habitat specialization and functional traits. We recommend that forest be protected, rustic coffee be promoted,and intensive coffee farms be restored by augmenting native tree density and richness and allowing growth of epiphytes. We also recommend that future research focus on potential trade-offs between biodiversity conservation and farmer livelihoods stemming from coffee production.


5.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Field-testing ecological and economic benefits of coffee certification programs
Philpott, Stacy M. ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Rice, Robert (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 21, no. 4 (August 2007), p. 975-985 ISSN: 0888-8892
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
44157-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Los agroecosistemas de café son críticos para el éxito de esfuerzos de conservación en América Latina debido a su importancia ecológica y económica. Los programas de certificación de café pueden ofrecer una manera de proteger la biodiversidad y mantener el sustento de los campesinos. Los programas de certificación de café caen en tres categorías distintas, pero no mutuamente excluyentes: orgánico, comercio justo y de sombra. Los resultados de estudios previos demuestran que la certificación de sombra puede beneficiar a la biodiversidad, pero no es claro si la participación de un campesino en cualquier programa de certificación puede proporcionar beneficios tanto ecológicos como económicos. Para estimar el valor de la certificación de café para los esfuerzos de conservación en la región, examinamos aspectos económicos y ecológicos de la producción de café en ocho cooperativas en Chiapas, México, que tenían certificado orgánico, certificado orgánico y comercio justo o no certificado. Comparamos la vegetación y la diversidad de aves y hormigas en las fincas cafetaleras y bosques, y entrevistamos a campesinos para determinar la producción de café, la ganancia bruta por la producción de café y la superficie con producción de café.

Aunque no hay fincas con certificación de sombra en la región de estudio, utilizamos datos de la vegetación para determinar si las cooperativas pudieran calificar para certificación de sombra. Con base en la certificación, no encontramos diferencias en las características de la vegetación, riqueza de especies de aves y hormigas o la fracción de fauna de bosque en las fincas. Los campesinos con certificación orgánica y orgánica y comercio justo tuvieron más tierra bajo cultivo y, en algunos casos, mayores ganancias que los campesinos no certificados. La superficie de producción de café no varió entre tipos de finca. Ninguna cooperativa alcanzó los estándares de certificación de sombra porque sus plantaciones carecían de estratificación vertical, aunque las variables de la vegetación para la certificación de sombra se correlacionaron significativamente con la diversidad de aves y hormigas. Aunque los campesinos del altiplano de Chiapas con certificación orgánica y/o de comercio justo pueden obtener algunos beneficios económicos de su estatus de certificación, sus fincas no protegen tanta biodiversidad como las fincas con certificación de sombra. Trabajar hacia la triple certificación (orgánica, comercio justo y sombra) a nivel de fincas puede reforzar la protección de biodiversidad, incrementar beneficios a los campesinos y llevar hacia estrategias de conservación más exitosas en regiones productoras de café.

Resumen en inglés

Coffee agroecosystems are critical to the success of conservation efforts in Latin America because of their ecological and economic importance. Coffee certification programs may offer one way to protect biodiversity and maintain farmer livelihoods. Established coffee certification programs fall into three distinct, but not mutually exclusive categories: organic, fair trade, and shade. The results of previous studies demonstrate that shade certification can benefit biodiversity, but it remains unclear whether a farmer's participation in any certification program can provide both ecological and economic benefits. To assess the value of coffee certification for conservation efforts in the region, we examined economic and ecological aspects of coffee production for eight coffee cooperatives in Chiapas, Mexico, that were certified organic, certified organic and fair trade, or uncertified. We compared vegetation and ant and bird diversity in coffee farms and forests, and interviewed farmers to determine coffee yield, gross revenue from coffee production, and area in coffee production. Although there are no shade-certified farms in the study region, we used vegetation data to determine whether cooperatives would qualify for shade certification.

We found no differences in vegetation characteristics, ant or bird species richness, or fraction of forest fauna in farms based on certification. Farmers with organic and organic and fair-trade certification had more land under cultivation and in some cases higher revenue than uncertified farmers. Coffee production area did not vary among farm types. No cooperative passed shade-coffee certification standards because the plantations lacked vertical stratification, yet vegetation variables for shade certification significantly correlated with ant and bird diversity. Although farmers in the Chiapas highlands with organic and/or fair-trade certification may reap some economic benefits from their certification status, their farms may not protect as much biodiversity as shade-certified farms. Working toward triple certification (organic, fair trade, and shade) at the farm level may enhance biodiversity protection, increase benefits to farmers, and lead to more successful conservation strategies in coffee-growing regions.


6.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Nonbreeding habitat selection and foraging behavior of the black-throated green warbler complex in southeastern Mexico
Greenberg, Russell ; González, Claudia Elia (coaut.) ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Reitsma, Robert (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: The Condor : An International Journal of Avian Biology Vol. 103, no. 1 (February 2001), p. 31-37 ISSN: 0010-5422
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B8996 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
PDF PDF PDF

7.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
The impact of avian insectivory on arthropods and leaf damage in some Guatemalan coffee plantations
Greenberg, Russell ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Cruz Angón, Andrea (coaut.) ; MacVean, Charles (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ecology a Publication of the Ecological Society of America Vol. 81 , no. 6 (June 2000), p. 1750-1755 ISSN: 0012-9658
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B10326 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
PDF
Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

Experimental work has established that vertebrates can have a large impact on the abundance of arthropods in temperate forest and grasslands, as well as on tropical islands. The importance of vertebrate insectivory has only rarely been evaluated for mainland tropical ecosystems. In this study, we used exclosures to measure the impact of birds on arthropods in Guatemalan coffee plantations. Variation in shade management on coffee farms provides a gradient of similar habitats that vary in the complexity of vegetative structure and floristics. We hypothesized that shaded coffee plantations, which support a higher abundance of insectivorous birds, would experience relatively greater levels of predation than would the sun coffee farms. We found a reduction (64–80%) in the number of large (. 5 mm in length) but not small arthropods in both coffee types which was consistent across most taxonomic groups and ecological guilds. We also found a small but significant increase in the frequency of herbivore damage on leaves in the exclosures. This level of predation suggests that birds may help in reducing herbivore numbers and is also consistent with food limitation for birds in coffee agroecosystems. However, the presence of shade did not have an effect on levels of insectivory.


8.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Bird populations in rustic and planted shade coffe plantations of eastern Chiapas, México
Greenberg, Russell ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Sterling, John (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biotropica Vol. 29, no. 4 (December 1997), p. 501-514 ISSN: 0006-3606
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
40304-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Much of the remaining “forest” vegetation in eastern Chiapas, Mexico is managed for coffee production. In this region coffee is grown under either the canopy of natural forest or under a planted canopy dominated by Inga spp. Despite the large differences in diversity of dominant plant species, both planted and rustic shade coffee plantations support a high overall diversity of bird species; we recorded approximately 105 species in each plantation type on fixed radius point counts. We accumulated a combined species list of 180 species on repeatedly surveyed transects through both coffee plantation types. These values are exceeded regionally only by moist tropical forest. Of the habitats surveyed, shade coffee was second only to acacia groves in the abundance and diversity of Nearctic migrants. The two plantation types have similar bird species lists and both are similar in composition to the dominant woodland—mixed pine-oak. Both types of shade coffee plantation habitats differ from other local habitats in supporting highly seasonal bird populations. Survey numbers almost double during the dry season—an increase that is found in omnivorous migrants and omnivorous, frugivorous, and nectarivorous resident species. Particularly large influxes were found for Tennessee warblers (Vermivora peregrina) and northern orioles (Icterus galbula) in Inga dominated plantations.


9.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Bird populations in shade and sun coffee plantations in Central Guatemala
Greenberg, Russell ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Cruz Angón, Andrea (coaut.) ; Reitsma, Robert (coaut.) ;
Clasificación: AR G/598.297281 / B5
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 11, no. 2 (april 1997), p. 448-459 ISSN: 0888-8892
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
SFA003074 (Disponible) , B9346 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

Estudiamos la avifauna de plantaciones de café en sol y sombra y los hábitats asociados de elevación media durante la temporada de seca de 1995. Los tres tipos de plantaciones (Inga, Gliricidia y de sol) mostraron una alta similaridad faunística y fueron tanto distintivas como pobres comparadas con los hábitats de matorral y parches boscosos. De todas los hábitats de plantaciones de café, el sombreado con Inga tuvo la diversidad mas alta. Las especies mas comunes encontradas en las plantaciones sombreadas fueron especies asociadas con vegetación con maderas, particularmente en plantaciones con Inga. Un segundo censo mostró una disminución en el número de aves, el cual fue mas pronunciado en plantaciones con sol, y sombreadas con Gliricidia que en aquellas con Inga. En general, las diferencias entre los tipos de plantaciones fueron pequeñas y todas las plantaciones de cafe fueron menos diversas que las plantaciones tradicionales de café estudiadas con anterioridad en los alrededores de Chiapas, México.

La relativamente baja diversidad de aves probablemente se debe a la baja estatura, baja diversidad de especies de árboles y a un intenso corte de la copa de los árboles. Estas características reflejan prácticas de manejo comunes a lo largo de toda América Latina. Las especies de aves mas comúnes en todos los hábitats de las plantaciones de café fueron especies de segundo-crecimiento o de borde. Especies mas especialistas de bosque estuvieron casi completamente ausentes de las plantaciones. Aunado a esto, muchas especies comúnes a matorrales fueron raras o ausentes en los cafetales, aún en las plantaciones de sol con las cuales los matorrales comparten una estructura superficial similar. Los cafetales probablemente serán importantes pare la diversidad de aves, si se mantiene una cobertura arborea alta y diversa tanto taxonómicamente como estructuralmente. Sugerimos que esto mas bien podría ocurrir en terrenos que son manejados con diversos productos que en aquellos designados exclusivamente para la producción de café.

We studied the avifauna of sun and shade coffee plantations and associated mid-elevation habitats during the dry season of 1995. The three plantation types (Inga, Gliricidia, and sun) showed high faunistic similarities with each other and were both distinct and depauperate compared to matorral and forest patch habitats. Of all the coffee plantation habitats, Inga shade had the highest diversity. Species associated with wooded vegetation were more common in shade plantations, particularly in Inga. A second census showed a decline in bird numbers that was more pronounced in sun and Gliricidia than in Inga plantations. Overall, differences between the plantation types were small and all coffee plantations were less diverse than traditional coffee farms previously studied in nearby Chiapas, México. The relatively low bird diversity was probably due to the low stature, low tree species diversity, and heavy pruning of the canopy. These features reflect management practices that are common throughout Latin America. The most common species of birds in all coffee plantation habitats were common second-growth or edge species; more specialized forest species were almost completely absent from plantations. Furthermore, many common matorral species were rare or absent from coffee plantations, even sun plantations with which matorral shares a similar superficial structure. Coffee plantations probably will only be important for avian diversity if a tall, taxonomically and structurally diverse canopy is maintained. We suggest this is most likely to occur on farms that are managed for a variety of products rather than those designated entirely for the production of coffee.