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7 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Birdsey, Richard
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There is an increasing need for approaches to determine reference emission levels and implement policies to address the objectives of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, plus improving forest management, carbon stock enhancement and conservation (REDD+). Important aspects of approaching emissions reductions include coordination and sharing of technology, data, protocols and experiences within and among countries to maximize resources and apply knowledge to build robust monitoring, reporting and veri fi cation (MRV) systems. We propose that enhancing the multiple facets of interoperability could facilitate implementation of REDD+ programs and actions. For this case, interoperability is a collective effort with the ultimate goal of sharing and using information to produce knowledge and apply knowledge gained, by removing conceptual, technological, organizational and cultural barriers. These efforts must come from various actors and institutions, including government ministries/agencies, scientific community, landowners, civil society groups and businesses. Here, we review the case of Mexico as an example of evolving interoperability in developing countries, and highlight challenges and opportunities for implementation of REDD+. Country-specific actions toward a higher degree of interoperability can be complex, expensive and even risky. These efforts provide leadership opportunities and will facilitate science–policy integration for implementation of REDD+, particularly in developing counties.


2.
Capítulo de libro - Memoria en libro con arbitraje
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Forest disturbance and carbon dynamics of North America
Birdsey, Richard A. ; Pan, Yude (coaut.) ; Lichstein, Jeremy (coaut.) ; Kasischke, Eric (coaut.) ; Masek, Jeff (coaut.) ; Meneses Tovar, Carmen (coaut.) ; Ángeles Pérez, Gregorio (coaut.) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (coaut.) ; Kurz, Werner A. (coaut.) ; Chen, Jing (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Estado actual del conocimiento del ciclo del carbono y sus interacciones en México: síntesis a 2011 Texcoco, Estado de México, México : Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México : Programa Mexicano del Carbono : Instituto Nacional de Ecología, 2012 p. 341-349 ISBN:978-607-7150-85-5
Bibliotecas: Campeche , Villahermosa
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SIBE Campeche
37740-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
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SIBE Villahermosa
37740-30 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
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Almost all forests are recovering from past disturbances. Large-scale maps of forest age (or time since disturbance) are effective ways to summarize the status of forest recovery and can be used to assess impacts and future trends. We review the status of developing a forest age map for all of North America including Mexico and Alaska where such maps have not yet been attempted. We summarize the different disturbance histories of Canada, USA, and Mexico, assess trends where data is available, and provide estimates of the impacts of selected recent disturbance events on tree mortality and forest carbon stocks. The main forest disturbances of Canada include harvesting, fire, and insects. Harvesting in Canada has been relatively stable, but fires have been decreasing in the last decade while areas affected by insects have been increasing. For the USA, main forest disturbances include harvesting, deforestation, fire, and insects. The area harvested in the USA has been declining although the volume harvested has been stable, while areas damaged by fire and insects have been increasing. The main disturbances of Mexico include deforestation, degradation, fires, and hurricanes. Of these, areas of deforestation and degradation appear to be declining, while trends in fire and hurricane disturbances are not yet evident. Each kind of disturbance affects carbon stocks in different ways, some more predictably than others.

For example, carbon (C) stocks enter a phase of recovery after a fire, whereas degradation is a process of reduction in C stock. Lack of spatially explicit disturbance histories, and highly variable impacts on ecosystems, hinder development of good quantitative estimates of effects on carbon stocks. Nonetheless, studies in the three countries suggest that past disturbances are the principal driving factors for trends in carbon stocks, and that future carbon stocks will be highly dependent on changes in disturbances affected by climate variability.


3.
Capítulo de libro - Memoria en libro con arbitraje
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Modelling forest carbon budgets in Mexico: progress and challenges
Kurz, Werner A. (autor) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (autor) ; Olguín Álvarez, Marcela Itzel (autora) ; Paz Pellat, Fernando (autor) ; Ángeles Pérez, Gregorio (autor) ; Zermeño Benítez, Carlos Edgar (autor) ; Smyth, Carolyn (autora) ; Stinson, Graham (autor) ; Birdsey, Richard A. (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Estado actual del conocimiento del ciclo del carbono y sus interacciones en México: síntesis a 2011 / Fernando Paz y Rosa M. Cuevas, editores Texcoco, Estado de México, México : Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. Programa Mexicano del Carbono : Instituto Nacional de Ecología, 2012 p. 774-775 ISBN:978-607-7150-85-5
Bibliotecas: Campeche , Villahermosa
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
37730-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
37730-30 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000–2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a −327 ± 252 TgC yr−1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (−248 TgC yr−1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (−297 TgC yr−1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr−1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated to be a small net source (+18 TgC yr−1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventory-based estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is −511 TgC yr−1 and −931 TgC yr−1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional −239 TgC yr−1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.


5.
Libro

6.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
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7.
Libro
Proceedings 1995 meetings of the Northern global change program / edited by John Hom, Richard Birdsey and Kelly O'Brian
Northern Global Change Research Program (1st : 1995 : Pittsburgh) ; Hom, John (ed.) ; Birdsey, Richard (coed.) ; O'Brian, Kelly (coed.) ;
Radnor, PA : Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station , c1996
Clasificación: 333.75160973 / N6
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
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SIBE Tapachula
ECO020011501 (Disponible)
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Contains articles presented at the 1995 Northern Global Change Program meeting on the following topics: monitoring and predicting regional environmental change, responses of northern tree species to regional stress, responses of ecosystem processes to regional stress, forest and landscape responses to regional stress and management activities, human-forest interactions and regional change, an integrated national model of the effects of global change on U.S. Forests, and boreal forest and global change.