Términos relacionados

13 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Bongers, Frans
  • «
  • 1 de 2
  • »
1.
Artículo
The montane multifunctional landscape: how stakeholders in a biosphere reserve derive benefits and address trade-offs in ecosystem service supply
Heinze, Alan (autor) ; Bongers, Frans (autor) ; Ramírez Marcial, Neptalí (autor) (1963-) ; García Barrios, Luis Enrique (autor) ; Kuyper, Thomas W. (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Ecosystem Services Volumen 44, artículo 101134 (2020), p. 1-10 ISSN: 2212-0416
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Ecosystem service (ES) assessments, which make an explicit link between nature and people’s well-being, can support the management of natural protected areas that face complex and persistent sustainability challenges. We present a case study of ES supply in a biosphere reserve community in southern Mexico. We aimed to identify stakeholder-relevant ES and to analyse trade-offs between them. After engaging local stakeholders, we conducted a biophysical assessment of ES supply and associations across four different land uses. Closed forests and riparian areas, which occurred in different parts of the landscape, supplied high levels of multiple ES. Furthermore, co-produced farming goods and services that supported local livelihoods and conservation-oriented ecosystem services coincided in these four habitats. Together, these habitats provided a diverse array of ES across the landscape, indicating that stakeholders benefited from a multifunctional landscape. At the same time significant trade-offs were found in the supply of forage cover against most other ES, especially tree-based goods and services. These trade-offs revealed conflicts between agricultural land and neighbouring open forests and riparian areas, as well as opposed service demands among beneficiary groups. To address these trade-offs, stakeholders agreed on enhancing forest benefits in order to support both local livelihoods and conservation goals.


2.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Biodiversity recovery of Neotropical secondary forests
Rozendaal, Danaë M. A. (autora) ; Bongers, Frans (coaut.) ; Aide, T. Mitchell (coaut.) ; Álvarez Dávila, Esteban (autor) ; Ascarrunz, Nataly (autora) ; Balvanera, Patricia (autora) ; Becknell, Justin M. (coaut.) ; Bentos, Tony V. (coaut.) ; Brancalion, Pedro H. S. (autor) ; Cabral, George A. L. (coaut.) ; Calvo Rodríguez, Sofía (autora) ; Chave, Jerome (coaut.) ; César, Ricardo G. (autor) ; Chazdon, Robin L. (autor) ; Condit, Richard (autor) ; Dallinga, Jorn S. (coaut.) ; Almeida Cortez, Jarcilene Silva (coaut.) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (autor) ; Oliveira, Alexandre A. de (autor) ; Denslow, Julie S. (autor) ; Dent, Daisy H. (coaut.) ; DeWalt, Saara J. (autora) ; Dupuy, Juan Manuel (autor) ; Durán, Sandra M. (autora) ; Dutrieux, Loïc P. (coaut.) ; Espírito Santo, Mario M. (autor) ; Fandino, María C. (autora) ; Fernandes, G. Wilson (autor) ; Finegan, Bryan (coaut.) ; García, Hernando (autor) ; González Valdivia, Noel Antonio (autor) ; Granda Moser, Vanessa (autora) ; Hall, Jefferson S. (autor) ; Hernández Stefanoni, José Luis (autor) ; Hubbell, Stephen (autor) ; Jakovac, Catarina C. (autora) ; Hernández, Alma Johanna (autora) ; Junqueira, André B. (autor) ; Kennard, Deborah (coaut.) ; Larpin, Denis (autora) ; Letcher, Susan G. (autora) ; Licona, Juan Carlos (autor) ; Lebrija Trejos, Edwin (autor) ; Marín Spiotta, Erika (autora) ; Martínez Ramos, Miguel (autor) ; Massoca, Paulo E. S. (autor) ; Meave, Jorge A. (autor) ; Mesquita, Rita C. G. (autora) ; Mora, Francisco (autor) ; Müller, Sandra C. (autora) ; Muñoz, Rodrigo (autor) ; Nolasco de Oliveira Neto, Silvio (autor) ; Norden, Natalia (autora) ; Nunes, Yule R. F. (coaut.) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (autora) ; Ortiz Malavassi, Edgar (autor) ; Ostertag, Rebecca (autora) ; Peña Claros, Marielos (autor) ; Pérez García, Eduardo A. (autor) ; Piotto, Daniel (autor) ; Powers, Jennifer S. (autora) ; Aguilar Cano, José (autor) ; Rodríguez Buritica, Susana (autora) ; Rodríguez Velázquez, Jorge (autor) ; Romero Romero, Marco Antonio (autor) ; Ruíz, Jorge (autor) ; Sánchez Azofeifa, Gerardo Arturo (autor) ; Silva de Almeida, Arlete (autor) ; Silver, Whendee L. (coaut.) ; Schwartz, Naomi B. (coaut.) ; Thomas, William Wayt (coaut.) ; Toledo, Marisol (autora) ; Uriarte, María (autora) ; Valadares de Sá Sampaio, Everardo (autor) ; van Breugel, Michiel (autor) ; Van Der Wal, Hans (coaut.) ; Martins, Sebastião Venâncio (autor) ; Veloso, María D. M. (autor) ; Vester, Hans F. M. (coaut.) ; Vicentini, Alberto (autor) ; Vieira, Ima C. G. (coaut.) ; Villa, Pedro (autor) ; Williamson, G. Bruce (autor) ; Zanini, Kátia J. (autora) ; Zimmerman, Jess (coaut.) ; Poorter, Lourens (coaut.) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Science Advances Vol. 5, no. 3, eaau3114 (March 2019), p. 1-10 ISSN: 2375-2548
PDF PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Old-growth tropical forests harbor an immense diversity of tree species but are rapidly being cleared, while secondary forests that regrow on abandoned agricultural lands increase in extent. We assess how tree species richness and composition recover during secondary succession across gradients in environmental conditions and anthropogenic disturbance in an unprecedented multisite analysis for the Neotropics. Secondary forests recover remarkably fast in species richness but slowly in species composition. Secondary forests take a median time of five decades to recover the species richness of old-growth forest (80% recovery after 20 years) based on rarefaction analysis. Full recovery of species composition takes centuries (only 34% recovery after 20 years). A dual strategy that maintains both old-growth forests and species-rich secondary forests is therefore crucial for biodiversity conservation in human-modified tropical landscapes.


3.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Wet and dry tropical forests show opposite successional pathways in wood density but converge over time
Poorter, Lourens (autor) ; Rozendaal, Danaë M. A. (autora) ; Bongers, Frans (autor) ; Almeida Cortez, Jarcilene Silva (autora) ; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica María (autora) ; Álvarez, Francisco S. (autor) ; Andrade, José Luis (autor) ; Arreola Villa, Luis Felipe (autor) ; Balvanera, Patricia (autora) ; Becknell, Justin M. (autor) ; Bentos, Tony V. (autor) ; Bhaskar, Radika (autora) ; Boukili, Vanessa (autora) ; Brancalion, Pedro H. S. (autor) ; Broadbent, Eben North (autor) ; César, Ricardo G. (autor) ; Chave, Jerome (autor) ; Chazdon, Robin L. (autor) ; Dalla Colletta, Gabriel (autor) ; Craven, Dylan (autor) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (autor) ; Denslow, Julie Sloan (autora) ; Dent, Daisy H. (autora) ; DeWalt, Saara J. (autora) ; Díaz García, Elisa (autora) ; Dupuy Rada, Juan Manuel (autor) ; Durán, Sandra M. (autora) ; Espírito Santo, Mario M. (autor) ; Fandiño, María C. (autora) ; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson (autor) ; Finegan, Bryan (autor) ; Granda Moser, Vanessa (autora) ; Hall, Jefferson S. (autor) ; Hernández Stefanoni, José Luis (autor) ; Jakovac, Catarina C. (autora) ; Junqueira, André B. (autor) ; Kennard, Deborah (autra) ; Lebrija Trejos, Edwin (autor) ; Letcher, Susan G. (autora) ; Lohbeck, Madelon (autora) ; López, Omar R. (autor) ; Marín Spiotta, Erika (autora) ; Martínez Ramos, Miguel (autor) ; Martins, Sebastião Venâncio (autor) ; Massoca, Paulo E. S. (autor) ; Meave, Jorge A. (autor) ; Mesquita, Rita C. G (autora) ; Mora, Francisco (autor) ; Moreno, Vanessa de Souza (autora) ; Müller, Sandra C. (autora) ; Muñoz, Rodrigo (autor) ; Muscarella, Robert (autor) ; Nolasco de Oliveira Neto, Silvio (autor) ; Nunes, Yule R. F. (autor) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (autora) ; Paz, Horacio (autor) ; Peña Claros, Marielos (autor) ; Piotto, Daniel (autor) ; Ruíz, Jorge (autor) ; Sanaphre Villanueva, Lucía (autora) ; Sánchez Azofeifa, Gerardo Arturo (autor) ; Schwartz, Naomi B. (autora) ; Steininger, Marc K. (autor) ; Thomas, William Wayt (autor) ; Toledo, Marisol (autora) ; Uriarte, María (autora) ; Utrera, Luis P. (autor) ; van Breugel, Michiel (autor) ; van der Sande, Masha T. (coaut.) ; Van Der Wal, Hans (coaut.) ; Veloso, María D. M. (autora) ; Vester, Henricus F. M. (autor) ; Vieira, Ima Celia G. (autora) ; Villa, Pedro Manuel (autor) ; Williamson, G. Bruce (autor) ; Wright, S. Joseph (autor) ; Zanini, Kátia J. (autora) ; Zimmerman, Jess K. (autor) ; Westoby, Mark (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Nature Ecology & Evolution Vol. 3, no. 6 (Jun 2019), p. 928–934 ISSN: 2397-334X
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Tropical forests are converted at an alarming rate for agricultural use and pastureland, but also regrow naturally through secondary succession. For successful forest restoration, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of secondary succession. These mechanisms may vary across forest types, but analyses across broad spatial scales are lacking. Here, we analyse forest recovery using 1,403 plots that differ in age since agricultural abandonment from 50 sites across the Neotropics. We analyse changes in community composition using species-specific stem wood density (WD), which is a key trait for plant growth, survival and forest carbon storage. In wet forest, succession proceeds from low towards high community WD (acquisitive towards conservative trait values), in line with standard successional theory. However, in dry forest, succession proceeds from high towards low community WD (conservative towards acquisitive trait values), probably because high WD reflects drought tolerance in harsh early successional environments. Dry season intensity drives WD recovery by influencing the start and trajectory of succession, resulting in convergence of the community WD over time as vegetation cover builds up. These ecological insights can be used to improve species selection for reforestation. Reforestation species selected to establish a first protective canopy layer should, among other criteria, ideally have a similar WD to the early successional communities that dominate under the prevailing macroclimatic conditions.


4.
Tesis - Doctorado
*En proceso técnico. Solicítelo con la bibliotecaria de SIBE-Villahermosa
Domestication of amazonian forests / Carolina Levis
Levis, Carolina ; Bongers, Frans (promotor) ; Peña Claros, Marielos (co-promotor) ; Costa, F. R. C. (co-promotor) ; Clement, C. R. (co-promotor) ;
Wageningen, Netherlands :: Manaus, Brazil : Wageningen University :: Instituto National de Pesquisas da Amazônia , 2018
Clasificación: 634.928 / L48
Bibliotecas: Villahermosa
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
ECO050006444 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En proceso técnico. Solicítelo con la bibliotecaria de SIBE-Villahermosa
PDF
Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The idea that Amazonian forests have been largely untouched by humans has fascinated naturalists, policy makers, the media, and natural and social scientists worldwide. For many decades, ecological studies overlooked the influence of past peoples in modern forests. However, humans arrived in the Amazon basin at least 13,000 years Before Present (BP) and populations expanded strongly around 2,500 years BP. Evidence of past human activities has been found in extensive areas previously considered pristine. Anthropogenic soils (Amazonian Dark Earths - ADE) and human-made earthworks found across the basin are examples of the landscapes domesticated by pre-Columbian peoples and evidence of large societies with considerable capacity for modifying the environment. Cultivation and management of Amazonian fora by past societies may have significantly contributed to the ecological patterns we see today. These findings stimulated an academic debate about the pristineness versus domestication of Amazonian forests. Although most scientists agree that human impacts were spatially heterogeneous across the basin, the scale of past human influences in Amazonian forests remains controversial. A more realistic and broad- scale view is required (Chapter 1). In my thesis, I integrated data from different disciplines in the social and natural sciences to generate the first broad-scale assessment of the effects of long-term human influences in modern Amazonian forests and how these legacies are maintained by local management practices. I studied the Amazon forest as a mosaic of patches domesticated to different degrees by human-nature interactions.

Índice

General introduction
Widespread distribution of ancient peoples along tributary rivers of Central Amazonia
Disentangling pre-Columbian from recent human influence in old-growth Amazonian forests
How people domesticated Amazonian forests
Extensive pre-Columbian soil improvement maintains human legacies in old-growth Amazonian forests
General discussion
References
Summary
Resumo
Acknowledgments
Short biography
List of publications
PE&RC Training and Education Statement


5.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Legume abundance along successional and rainfall gradients in Neotropical forests
Gei, Maga ; Rozendaal, Danaë M. A. (coaut.) ; Poorter, Lourens (coaut.) ; Bongers, Frans (coaut.) ; Sprent, Janet I. (coaut.) ; Garner, Mira D. (coaut.) ; Aide, T. Mitchell (coaut.) ; Andrade, José Luis (coaut.) ; Balvanera, Patricia (coaut.) ; Becknell, Justin M. (coaut.) ; Brancalion, Pedro H. S. (coaut.) ; Cabral, George A. L. (coaut.) ; Gomes César, Ricardo (coaut.) ; Chazdon, Robin L. (coaut.) ; Cole, Rebecca J. (coaut.) ; Dalla Colletta, Gabriel (coaut.) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (coaut.) ; Denslow, Julie S. (coaut.) ; Dent, Daisy H. (coaut.) ; DeWalt, Saara J. (coaut.) ; Dupuy, Juan Manuel (coaut.) ; Durán, Sandra M. (coaut.) ; do Espírito Santo, Mário Marcos (coaut.) ; Fernandes, G. Wilson (coaut.) ; Ferreira Nunes, Yule Roberta (coaut.) ; Finegan, Bryan (coaut.) ; Granda Moser, Vanessa (coaut.) ; Hall, Jefferson S. (coaut.) ; Hernández Stefanoni, José Luis (coaut.) ; Junqueira, André B. (coaut.) ; Kennard, Deborah (coaut.) ; Lebrija Trejos, Edwin (coaut.) ; Letcher, Susan G. (coaut.) ; Lohbeck, Madelon (coaut.) ; Marín Spiotta, Erika (coaut.) ; Martínez Ramos, Miguel (coaut.) ; Meave, Jorge A. (coaut.) ; Menge, Duncan N. L. (coaut.) ; Mora, Francisco (coaut.) ; Muñoz, Rodrigo (coaut.) ; Muscarella, Robert (coaut.) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (coaut.) ; Orihuela Belmonte, Dolores Edith (coaut.) ; Ostertag, Rebecca (coaut.) ; Peña Claros, Marielos (coaut.) ; Pérez García, Eduardo A. (coaut.) ; Piotto, Daniel (coaut.) ; Reich, Peter B. (coaut.) ; Reyes García, Casandra (coaut.) ; Rodríguez Velázquez, Jorge (coaut.) ; Romero Pérez, Isabel Eunice (coaut.) ; Sanaphre-Villanueva, Lucía (coaut.) ; Sánchez Azofeifa, Arturo (coaut.) ; Schwartz, Naomi B. (coaut.) ; Silva de Almeida, Arlete (coaut.) ; Almeida Cortez, Jarcilene Silva (coaut.) ; Silver, Whendee L. (coaut.) ; de Souza Moreno, Vanessa (coaut.) ; Sullivan, Benjamin W. (coaut.) ; Swenson, Nathan G. (coaut.) ; Uriarte, María (coaut.) ; van Breugel, Michiel (coaut.) ; Van Der Wal, Hans (coaut.) ; Magalhães Veloso, Maria Das Dores (coaut.) ; Vester, Hans F. M. (coaut.) ; Guimarães Vieira, Ima Célia (coaut.) ; Zimmerman, Jess K. (coaut.) ; Powers, Jennifer S. (caout.) ;
Contenido en: Nature Ecology and Evolution Vol. 2, no. 7 (Jun. 2018), p. 1104–1111 ISSN: 2397-334X
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of forest inventory plots from a network of 42 Neotropical forest chronosequences. During the first three decades of natural forest regeneration, legume basal area is twice as high in dry compared with wet secondary forests. The tremendous ecological success of legumes in recently disturbed, water-limited forests is likely to be related to both their reduced leaflet size and ability to fix N2, which together enhance legume drought tolerance and water-use efficiency. Earth system models should incorporate these large-scale successional and climatic patterns of legume dominance to provide more accurate estimates of the maximum potential for natural nitrogen fixation across tropical forests.


6.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Wild native trees in tropical homegardens of Southeast Mexico: fostered by fragmentation, mediated by management
Rooduijn, Bastiaan ; Bongers, Frans (coaut.) ; Van Der Wal, Hans (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment Vol. 254, (February 2018), p. 149-161 ISSN: 0167-8809
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Tropical homegardens (THGs) are a model system for rural development that may reconcile food production with social resilience and biodiversity conservation, particularly in rapidly changing landscapes. This study quantified the sink function of THGs for wild native trees in relation to tree cover fragmentation, garden management and household socio-economics. Abundance, richness and diversity of naturally established spared native trees were recorded for 59 rural THGs in Southeast Mexico, along a gradient of tree cover fragmentation. The majority of native species and individuals encountered in THGs had arrived naturally. Contrary to previous work, both the abundance and diversity of spared native trees increased with tree cover fragmentation. However, this sink function was strongly mediated by the type of garden management: lush, multi-layered gardens and gardens with few exotics and low labour input had more spared native trees of more species, while simple-structured gardens and gardens with high labour input and many exotic fruits had only few. Overall, the results indicate that tree cover fragmentation determines which species come in, and management determines how many of each stay. Our results clearly demonstrate that THGs are crucial sinks for wild native trees in deforested fragmented landscapes. THGs are ubiquitous, and could also be key sources for reforestation; here we coin homegarden-based natural regeneration as a new concept. Since garden management has a clear impact, further research is needed as to how socio-economic, cultural and ecological functions of THGs can be optimised in different landscape contexts.


7.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Biomass resilience of Neotropical secondary forests
Poorter, Lourens (coaut.) ; Bongers, Frans (coaut.) ; Aide, T. Mitchell (coaut.) ; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M. (coaut.) ; Balvanera, Patricia (coaut.) ; Becknell, Justin M. (coaut.) ; Boukili, Vanessa (coaut.) ; Brancalion, Pedro H. S. (coaut.) ; Broadbent, Eben N. (coaut.) ; Chazdon, Robin L. (coaut.) ; Craven, Dylan (coaut.) ; Almeida Cortez, Jarcilene Silva (coaut.) ; Cabral, George A. L. (coaut.) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (coaut.) ; Denslow, Julie Sloan (coaut.) ; Dent, Daisy H. (coaut.) ; DeWalt, Saara J. (coaut.) ; Dupuy, Juan Manuel (coaut.) ; Durán, Sandra M. (coaut.) ; Espírito Santo, Mario M. (coaut.) ; Fandino, María C. (coaut.) ; César, Ricardo G. (coaut.) ; Hall, Jefferson S. (coaut.) ; Hernández Stefanoni, José Luis (coaut.) ; Jakovac, Catarina C. (coaut.) ; Junqueira, André B. (coaut.) ; Kennard, Deborah (coaut.) ; Letcher, Susan G. (coaut.) ; Licona, Juan Carlos (coaut.) ; Lohbeck, Madelon (coaut.) ; Marín Spiotta, Erika (coaut.) ; Martínez Ramos, Miguel (coaut.) ; Massoca, Paulo E. S. (coaut.) ; Meave, Jorge A. (coaut.) ; Mesquita, Rita C. G. (coaut.) ; Mora, Francisco (coaut.) ; Muñoz, Rodrigo (coaut.) ; Muschler, Reinhold G. (coaut.) ; Nunes, Yule R. F. (coaut.) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (coaut.) ; Oliveira, Alexandre A. de (coaut.) ; Orihuela Belmonte, Dolores Edith (coaut.) ; Peña Claros, Marielos (coaut.) ; Pérez García, Eduardo A. (coaut.) ; Piotto, Daniel (coaut.) ; Powers, Jennifer S. (coaut.) ; Rodríguez Velázquez, Jorge (coaut.) ; Romero Pérez, Isabel Eunice (coaut.) ; Ruíz, Jorge (coaut.) ; Saldarriaga, Juan G. (coaut.) ; Sánchez Azofeifa, Gerardo Arturo (coaut.) ; Schwartz, Naomi B. (coaut.) ; Steininger, Marc K. (coaut.) ; Swenson, Nathan G. (coaut.) ; Toledo, Marisol (coaut.) ; Uriarte, María (coaut.) ; van Breugel, Michiel (coaut.) ; Van Der Wal, Hans (coaut.) ; Veloso, María D. M. (coaut.) ; Vester, Hans F. M. (coaut.) ; Vicentini, Alberto (coaut.) ; Vieira, Ima Celia G. (coaut.) ; Vizcarra Bentos, Tony (coaut.) ; Williamson, G. Bruce (coaut.) ; Rozendaal, Danaë M. A. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Nature Vol. 530, no. 211 (February 2016), p. 211–214 ISSN: 0028-0836
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Land-use change occurs nowhere more rapidly than in the tropics, where the imbalance between deforestation and forest regrowth has large consequences for the global carbon cycle1. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the rate of biomass recovery in secondary forests, and how these rates are influenced by climate, landscape, and prior land use2–4. Here we analyse aboveground biomass recovery during secondary succession in 45 forest sites and about 1,500 forest plots covering the major environmental gradients in the Neotropics. The studied secondary forests are highly productive and resilient. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years was on average 122 megagrams per hectare (Mg ha−¹), corresponding to a net carbon uptake of 3.05 Mg C ha−¹ yr−¹, 11 times the uptake rate of old-growth forests. Aboveground biomass stocks took a median time of 66 years to recover to 90% of old-growth values. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years varied 11.3-fold (from 20 to 225 Mg ha−¹) across sites, and this recovery increased with water availability (higher local rainfall and lower climatic water deficit). We present a biomass recovery map of Latin America, which illustrates geographical and climatic variation in carbon sequestration potential during forest regrowth. The map will support policies to minimize forest loss in areas where biomass resilience is naturally low (such as seasonally dry forest regions) and promote forest regeneration and restoration in humid tropical lowland areas with high biomass resilience.


8.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Carbon sequestration potential of second-growth forest regeneration in the Latin American tropics
Chazdon, Robin L. (coaut.) ; Broadbent, Eben N. (coaut.) ; Rozendaal, Danaë M. A. (coaut.) ; Bongers, Frans (coaut.) ; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M. (coaut.) ; Aide, T. Mitchell (coaut.) ; Balvanera, Patricia (coaut.) ; Becknell, Justin M. (coaut.) ; Boukili, Vanessa (coaut.) ; Brancalion, Pedro H. S. (coaut.) ; Craven, Dylan (coaut.) ; Almeida Cortez, Jarcilene Silva (coaut.) ; Cabral, George A. L. (coaut.) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (coaut.) ; Denslow, Julie S. (coaut.) ; Dent, Daisy H. (coaut.) ; DeWalt, Saara J. (coaut.) ; Dupuy, Juan M. (coaut.) ; Durán, Sandra M. (coaut.) ; Espírito Santo, Mario M. (coaut.) ; Fandino, María C. (coaut.) ; César, Ricardo G. (coaut.) ; Hall, Jefferson S. (coaut.) ; Hernández Stefanoni, José Luis (coaut.) ; Jakovac, Catarina C. (coaut.) ; Junqueira, André B. (coaut.) ; Kennard, Deborah (coaut.) ; Letcher, Susan G. (coaut.) ; Lohbeck, Madelon (coaut.) ; Martínez Ramos, Miguel (coaut.) ; Massoca, Paulo (coaut.) ; Meave, Jorge A. (coaut.) ; Mesquita, Rita (coaut.) ; Mora, Francisco (coaut.) ; Muñoz, Rodrigo (coaut.) ; Muscarella, Robert (coaut.) ; Nunes, Yule R. F. (coaut.) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (coaut.) ; Orihuela Belmonte, Dolores Edith (coaut.) ; Peña Claros, Marielos (coaut.) ; Pérez García, Eduardo A. (coaut.) ; Piotto, Daniel (coaut.) ; Powers, Jennifer S. (coaut.) ; Rodríguez Velázquez, Jorge (coaut.) ; Romero Pérez, Isabel Eunice (coaut.) ; Ruíz, Jorge (coaut.) ; Saldarriaga, Juan G. (coaut.) ; Sánchez Azofeifa, G. Arturo (coaut.) ; Schwartz, Naomi B. (coaut.) ; Steininger, Marc K. (coaut.) ; Swenson, Nathan G. (coaut.) ; Uriarte, María (coaut.) ; van Breugel, Michiel (coaut.) ; Van Der Wal, Hans (coaut.) ; Veloso, María D. M. (coaut.) ; Vester, Hans (coaut.) ; Vieira, Ima Celia G. (coaut.) ; Vizcarra Bentos, Tony (coaut.) ; Williamson, G. Bruce (coaut.) ; Poorter, Lourens (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Science Advances Vol. 2, no. 5, e1501639 (May 2016), p. 1-10 ISSN: 2375-2548
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Regrowth of tropical secondary forests following complete or nearly complete removal of forest vegetation actively stores carbon in aboveground biomass, partially counterbalancing carbon emissions from deforestation, forest degradation, burning of fossil fuels, and other anthropogenic sources. We estimate the age and spatial extent of lowland second-growth forests in the Latin American tropics and model their potential aboveground carbon accumulation over four decades. Our model shows that, in 2008, second-growth forests (1 to 60 years old) covered 2.4 million km² of land (28.1%of the total study area).Over 40 years, these lands can potentially accumulate a total aboveground carbon stock of 8.48 Pg C (petagrams of carbon) in aboveground biomass via low-cost natural regeneration or assisted regeneration, corresponding to a total CO2 sequestration of 31.09 Pg CO2. This total is equivalent to carbon emissions from fossil fuel use and industrial processes in all of Latin America and the Caribbean from1993 to 2014. Ten countries account for 95% of this carbon storage potential, led by Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and Venezuela. We model future land-use scenarios to guide national carbon mitigation policies. Permitting natural regeneration on 40% of lowland pastures potentially stores an additional 2.0 Pg C over 40 years. Our study provides information and maps to guide national-level forest-based carbon mitigation plans on the basis of estimated rates of natural regeneration and pasture abandonment. Coupled with avoided deforestation and sustainable forestmanagement, natural regeneration of second-growth forests provides a low-costmechanism that yields a high carbon sequestration potential with multiple benefits for biodiversity and ecosystem services.


9.
Tesis - Maestría
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Economic strategies of families and agrobiodiversity of home gardens in the Los Ríos region, Tabasco, Mexico / Ximena Checa Rivas
Checa Rivas, Ximena ; Bongers, Frans (supervisor) ; Van Der Wal, Hans (supervisor) ;
Wageningen, The Netherlands : Universidad de Wageningen, Forest Ecology and Forest Management , 2015
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
PDF
Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Home gardens are commonly considered as multistory combinations of trees and crops often associated with domesticate animals around the homestead. They provide products and services for the families, which motivate the shaping of the form, structure, diversity and function of the home garden by their owners through the management, selection and conservation of species. The maintaining of a diversified home garden is part of a diversified livelihood strategy that aims to continuously adapt to changing social and/or economic conditions. This strategy involves the construction of a diverse portfolio of activities that allows families to improve their living conditions and security, alleviate livelihood distress and respond to crisis. The decisions of families in this regard, will also affect the agrobiodiversity of the home gardens. We try to respond the following question: How do economic strategies of rural families influence the agrobiodiversity of home gardens? To answer this question, we applied a socioeconomic questionnaire and open questions to 66 farmer families, with known biodiversity in their home gardens. The sample of families was evenly distributed over the three main geographical conditions (mountain slopes, small hills and floodplains) in the Los Ríos region in Tabasco, Mexico. We used clustering of main economic activities to group families according to their livelihood strategies and determined if agrobiodiversity of the home garden varied between the clusters. We found no differences in species richness between the gropus of families with particular strategies. We conclude that families, the basic unit of production and consumption, manage to combine their overall economic strategy with maintaining diversity in home garden, and that the latter is an essential part of this strategy.

Índice

1. Introduction
2. Material and Methods
2.1. Study Area
2.2. Methodology
2.2.1 First phase
2.2.2 Second phase
3. Results
3.1. First phase
3.1.1. Economic activities
3.1.2. Clusters of families: Economic strategies
3.1.3. Agrobiodiversity in the home gardens
3.1.4 Division of labor and gender
3.2. Second phase
4. Discussion
4.1. First phase
4.1.1. Economic activities
4.1.2. Economic strategies
4.1.3. Economic strategies and agrobiodiversity
4.1.4. Division of labor and gender
4.2. Second phase
5. Conclusions
6. Literature


PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The high species richness of tropical forests has long been recognized, yet there remains substantial uncertainty regarding the actual number of tropical tree species. Using a pantropical tree inventory database from closed canopy forests, consisting of 657,630 trees belonging to 11,371 species, we use a fitted value of Fisher’s alpha and an approximate pantropical stem total to estimate the minimum number of tropical forest tree species to fall between ∼40,000 and ∼53,000, i.e., at the high end of previous estimates. Contrary to common assumption, the Indo-Pacific region was found to be as species-rich as the Neotropics, with both regions having a minimum of ∼19,000–25,000 tree species. Continental Africa is relatively depauperate with a minimumof ∼4,500–6,000 tree species. Very few species are shared among the African, American, and the Indo-Pacific regions. We provide a methodological framework for estimating species richness in trees that may help refine species richness estimates of tree-dependent taxa.