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This sourcebook provides a consensus perspective from the global community of earth observation and carbon experts on methodological issues relating to quantifying the greenhouse gas (GHG) impacts of implementing mitigation activities related to the forest land use in developing countries (REDD+). At current status of negotiation five forestrelated activities have been listed to be implemented as mitigation actions by developing countries, namely: reducing emissions from deforestation (which implies a land-use change) and reducing emissions from forest degradation, conservation of forest carbon stocks, sustainable management of forest, Enhancement of forest carbon stocks (all relating to carbon stock changes and GHG emissions within managed forest land use). The UNFCCC negotiations and related country submissions on REDD+ have advocated that methodologies and tools become available for estimating emissions and removals from deforestation and forest land management with an acceptable level of certainty. Based on the current status of negotiations and UNFCCC approved methodologies, the Sourcebook aims to provide additional explanation, clarification, and methodologies to support REDD+ early actions and readiness mechanisms for building national REDD+ monitoring systems. It compliments the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories and it is aimed at being fully consistent with this IPCC Guidelines and with the UNFCCC reporting guidelines on annual inventories (FCCC/SBSTA/2006/9). The book emphasizes the role of satellite remote sensing as an important tool for monitoring changes in forest cover, provides guidance on how to obtain credible estimates of forest carbon stocks and related changes, and provides clarification on the use of IPCC Guidelines for estimating and reporting GHG emissions and removals from forest lands.

The sourcebook is the outcome of an ad-hoc REDD+ working group of “Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics” (GOFC-GOLD, www.fao.org/gtos/gofcgold/), a technical panel of the Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS). The working group has been active since the initiation of the UNFCCC REDD+ process in 2005, has organized REDD+ expert workshops, and has contributed to related UNFCCC/SBSTA side events and GTOS submissions. GOFC-GOLD provides an independent expert platform for international cooperation and communication to formulate scientific consensus and provide technical input to the discussions and for implementation activities. A number of international experts in remote sensing, carbon measurement and reporting under the UNFCCC have contributed to the development of this sourcebook. With political discussions and negotiations ongoing, the current document provides the starting point for defining an appropriate monitoring framework considering current technical capabilities to monitor gross GHG emissions from changes in forest cover by deforestation and forest land management. This sourcebook is a living document and further methods and technical details can be specified and added with evolving negotiations and science. Respective communities are invited to provide comments and feedback to evolve a more detailed and refined guidelines document in the future.

Índice

1 Introduction
1.1 Purpose and Scope of the Sourcebook
1.2 IPCC Context and Requirements
1.2.1 LULUCF in the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol
1.2.2 Definition of forests, deforestation and degradation
1.2.3 General method for estimating CO2 emissions and removals
1.2.4 Reference levels and benchmark forest area map
1.3 Clarifying REDD+ Elements Causing Forest Carbon Stock Change
1.4 Emerging Issues for REDD+ Implementation
1.5 Roadmap for the Sourcebook
2 Guidance on Methods
2.1 Monitoring Of Changes In Forest Area
2.1.1 Scope of chapter
2.1.2 Monitoring of changes of forest areas - deforestation and forestation
2.2 Monitoring of Change in Forest Land Remaining Forest Land
2.2.1 Direct approach to monitor selective logging
2.2.2 Indirect approach to monitor forest degradation
2.2.3 Key references for Section 2.2.
2.3 Estimation of Above Ground Carbon Stocks
2.3.1 Scope of chapter
2.3.2 Overview of carbon stocks, and issues related to C stocks
2.3.3 Which Tier should be used?
2.3.4 Stratification by carbon stocks
2.3.5 Estimation of carbon stocks of forests undergoing change
2.3.6 Estimation of soil carbon stocks
2.4 Methods for Estimating CO2 Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation
2.4.1 Scope of chapter
2.4.2 Linkage to 2006 IPCC Guidelines
2.4.3 Organization of chapter
2.4.4 Fundamental carbon estimating issues
2.4.5 Estimation of emissions from deforestation
2.4.6 Estimation of emissions from forest degradation
2.5 Methods for Estimating GHG Emissions from Biomass Burning
2.5.1 Scope of chapter
2.5.2 Introduction
2.5.3 IPCC guidelines for estimating fire-related emission
2.5.4 Mapping fire from space
2.5.5 Using existing products
2.5.6 Case studies
2.5.7 Key references for Section 2.5.
2.6 Estimation of Uncertainties
2.6.1 Scope of chapter
2.6.2 General concepts
2.6.3 Quantification of uncertainties

2.6.4 Key references for Section 2.6.
2.7 Methods to Address Emerging Issues for REDD+ Implementation
2.7.1 Identifying drivers of deforestation and degradation with remote sensing
2.7.2 Safeguards to ensure protection of biodiversity
2.7.3 Safeguards to ensure rights of forest dwellers
2.7.4 Monitoring displacement of emissions and permanence at a national scale
2.7.5 Linking national and sub-national monitoring
2.8 Guidance on Reporting
2.8.1 Scope of chapter
2.8.2 Overview of reporting principles and procedures
2.8.3 What are the major challenges for developing countries?
2.8.4 The conservativeness approach
2.8.5 Key references for chapter 2.8.
2.9 Status of Evolving Technologies
2.9.1 Scope of chapter
2.9.2 Role of LIDAR observations
2.9.3 Forest monitoring using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations
2.9.4 Integration of satellite and in situ data for biomass mapping
2.9.5 Targeted airborne surveys to support carbon stock estimations – a case study
2.9.6 Modeling and forecasting forest-cover change
2.9.7 Cloud-computing and web-based approaches to support national forest monitoring
2.9.8 Summary and recommendations
2.9.9 Key references for Section 2.9.
3 Practical Examples for Data Collection
3.1 Methods Used By Annex-1 Countries for National Lulucf Inventories
3.1.1 Scope of chapter
3.1.2 Methods for estimating forest area changes
3.1.3 Methods for estimating carbon stock changes
3.1.4 National carbon budget models
3.1.5 Estimation of uncertainties
3.1.6 Key References for section 3.1.
3.2 Overview of the Existing Forest Area Changes Monitoring Systems
3.2.1 Scope of chapter
3.2.2 National case studies
3.2.3 Key references for Section

3.3 From National Forest Inventory to National Forest GHG Inventories
3.3.1 Scope of chapter
3.3.2 Introduction on forest inventories in tropical countries
3.3.3 Indian national forest inventory (NFI)
3.3.4 GHG emissions in Mexico from land-use change and forestry
3.3.5 Key references for Section 3.3.
3.4 Community Forest Monitoring
3.4.1 Scope of chapter: rationale for community based inventories
3.4.2 How communities can make their own forest inventories
3.4.3 Additional data requirements
3.4.4 Reliability and accuracy
3.4.5 Costs
3.4.6 Options for independent assessment of locally collected data
3.4.7 Emerging information needs and technologies for locally collected data
4 Country Capacity Building
4.1 Scope of Chapter
4.2 Building National Carbon Monitoring Systems for REDD: Elements And Capacities
4.2.1 Key elements and required capacities - overview
4.2.2 Key elements and required capacities - GHG inventories
4.2.3 Key elements and required capacities - current monitoring capacities
4.3 Capacity Gaps and Cost Implications
4.3.1 Importance of monitoring for establishing a national REDD+ infrastructure
4.3.2 Planning and design
4.3.3 Institutional capacities
4.3.4 Cost factors for monitoring change in forest area
4.3.5 Cost factors for monitoring change in carbon stocks
4.3.6 Spatial data infrastructure, access and reporting procedures
4.4 Linking Monitoring and Policy Development
4.5 Key References for Section 4


Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Although forest conservation activities, particularly in the tropics, offer significant potential for mitigating carbon (C) emissions, these types of activities have faced obstacles in the policy arena caused by the difficulty in determining key elements of the project cycle, particularly the baseline. A baseline for forest conservation has two main components: the projected land-use change and the corresponding carbon stocks in applicable pools in vegetation and soil, with land-use change being the most difficult to address analytically. In this paper we focus on developing and comparing three models, ranging from relatively simple extrapolations of past trends in land use based on simple drivers such as population growth to more complex extrapolations of past trends using spatially explicit models of land-use change driven by biophysical and socioeconomic factors.

The three models used for making baseline projections of tropical deforestation at the regional scale are: the Forest Area Change (FAC) model, the Land Use and Carbon Sequestration (LUCS) model, and the Geographical Modeling (GEOMOD) model. The models were used to project deforestation in six tropical regions that featured different ecological and socioeconomic conditions, population dynamics, and uses of the land: (1) northern Belize; (2) Santa Cruz State, Bolivia; (3) Parana´ State, Brazil; (4) Campeche, Mexico; (5) Chiapas, Mexico; and (6) Michoaca´n, Mexico.A comparison of all model outputs across all six regions shows that each model produced quite different deforestation baselines. In general, the simplest FAC model, applied at the national administrative-unit scale, projected the highest amount of forest loss (four out of six regions) and the LUCS model the least amount of loss (four out of five regions).

Based on simulations of GEOMOD, we found that readily observable physical and biological factors as well as distance to areas of past disturbance were each about twice as important as either sociological/ demographic or economic/infrastructure factors (less observable) in explaining empirical land-use patterns.We propose from the lessons learned, a methodology comprised of three main steps and six tasks can be used to begin developing credible baselines. We also propose that the baselines be projected over a 10-year period because, although projections beyond 10 years are feasible, they are likely to be unrealistic for policy purposes. In the first step, an historic land-use change and deforestation estimate is made by determining the analytic domain (size of the region relative to the size of proposed project), obtaining historic data, analyzing candidate baseline drivers, and identifying three to four major drivers. In the second step, a baseline of where deforestation is likely to occur–a potential land-use change (PLUC) map—is produced using a spatial model such as GEOMOD that uses the key drivers from step one.

Then rates of deforestation are projected over a 10-year baseline period based on one of the three models. Using the PLUC maps, projected rates of deforestation, and carbon stock estimates, baseline projections are developed that can be used for project GHG accounting and crediting purposes: The final step proposes that, at agreed interval (e.g., about 10 years), the baseline assumptions about baseline drivers be re-assessed. This step reviews the viability of the 10-year baseline in light of changes in one or more key baseline drivers (e.g., new roads, new communities, new protected area, etc.). The potential land-use change map and estimates of rates of deforestation could be re-done at the agreed interval, allowing the deforestation rates and changes in spatial drivers to be incorporated into a defense of the existing baseline, or the derivation of a new baseline projection.


3.
Libro
Los investigadores de la cultura maya 11
Encuentro: Los Investigadores de la Cultura Maya (11 : 2003 : Ciudad de Campeche, Campeche) ;
Campeche, Campeche, México : Universidad Autónoma de Campeche, Dirección de Difusión Cultural , 2003
Clasificación: CA/305.872 / E5/11
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040002063 (Disponible) , ECO040002062 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2

4.
Libro
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

As atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases continue to increase, so does the potential for atmospheric warming and associated climate change. In an effort to address the threat of global climate change, 155 countries signed the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. As of the first session of the Conference of the Parties, 128 nations had ratified the Convention. Among their other commitments, Parties to the Convention must develop and periodically update national inventories of net anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions using comparable methodologies, and must develop and implement national programs to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. To further the development of emission inventories and mitigation options within the African context, 64 governmental and non-governmental scientists and policy analysts from 23 nations gathered at a workshop near Johannesburg, South Africa from 29 May to 2 June 1995. The workshop focused on forestry, land-use change, and agriculture, because these sectors not only are responsible for the majority of emissions from the continent and provide promising opportunities for emissions mitigation, but also are a vital component of African economic growth and development. This book presents the workshop's major conclusions and findings, as well as individual papers that were prepared for the workshop, each of which was peer-reviewed and accepted for publication as part of the workshop process.

The papers cover four areas: (1) issues are associated with data collection and emission factor determination; (2) problems associated with applying the IPCC inventory methodologies in Africa; (3) results of national inventory assessments in Africa; and (4) possible emissions mitigation options and methods for evaluating their potential viability. As the first book dedicated solely to greenhouse gas emissions and mitigation options in Africa, this will be an invaluable resource to scientists, policymakers, and development specialists interested in global climate change and Africa.


5.
Libro
Saving the planet: how to shape an environmentally sustainable global economy / Lester R. Brown, Christopher Flavin, Sandra Postel
Brown, Lester R. ; Flavin, Christopher ; Postel, Sandra (coaut.) ;
New York : W. W. Norton , 1991
Clasificación: 333.72 / B7
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
SAA003186 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1