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4 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Céréghino, Régis
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1.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Ant and spider species as surrogates for functional community composition of epiphyte-associated invertebrates in a tropical moist forest
Céréghino, Régis ; Corbara, Bruno (coaut.) ; Hénaut, Yann (coaut.) ; Bonhomme, Camille (coaut.) ; Compin, Arthur (coaut.) ; Dejean, Alain (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ecological Indicators Vol. 96, Part 1 (January 2019), p. 694-700 ISSN: 1470-160X
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Epiphytes represent up to 50% of all plant species in rainforests, where they host a substantial amount of invertebrate biomass. Efficient surrogates for epiphyte invertebrate communities could reduce the cost of biomonitoring surveys while preventing destructive sampling of the plants. Here, we focus on the invertebrate communities associated to tank bromeliads. We ask whether the presence of particular ant and/or spider taxa (easily surveyed taxa) that use these plants as nesting and/or foraging habitats predicts functional trait combinations of aquatic invertebrate communities hosted by the plants. Functional community composition of invertebrates was predicted both by bromeliad habitat features and the presence of certain ant and spider species. The ant Azteca serica preferred wider bromeliad rosettes that trap large amount of detritus, indicating interstitiallike food webs dominated by deposit feeders that burrow in fine particulate organic matter. Leucauge sp. spiders preferred narrower bromeliad rosettes bearing smaller detrital loads, thereby indicating a dominance of pelagic filter-feeding and predatory invertebrates in the water-filled leaf axils. Both Neoponera villosa ants and Eriophora sp. spiders preferred rosettes at intermediate size bearing moderate amounts of detritus, indicating a benthic food web dominated by leaf shredders and gathering collectors. Owing to the animal diversity and biomass supported by rainforest epiphytes, our approach would deserve to be further tested on a range of epiphytes involved in tight interactions with invertebrates. In this context, surrogate species could serve both as indicators of functional diversity, and as early-warning indicators of network disassembly.


2.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Age-dependent strategies related to lionfish activities in the Mexican Caribbean
García Rivas, María del Carmen (autora) ; Machkour M'Rabet, Salima (autora) ; Pérez Lachaud, Gabriela (autora) ; Schmitter Soto, Juan Jacobo (autor) ; Céréghino, Régis (autor) ; Doneys, Cassiopea (autora) ; St Jean, Nikolas (autor) ; Hénaut, Yann (autor) ;
Contenido en: Environmental Biology of Fishes Vol. 101, no. 4, 122 (April 2018), p. 563–578 ISSN: 0378-1909
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Lionfish are successful invasive predators in the Caribbean region and inhabit a large range of habitats. Our study in the Caribbean has focused on the relationships between the biological characteristics of lionfish particularly their size, their activities and use of those different habitats. In this study, we observed a high number of lionfish individuals, focusing on the behavioural activities and biological traits in relation to different habitats and environmental characteristics. We monitored 793 individuals, recording their activities, biological traits, and habitat characteristics. Our results report that lionfish are not solitary, but frequently form groups for many activities. We provide evidence of differences between lionfish habitat use according to activity, and the size of individual fish. Considering the size is correlated with age, coral reefs appear to be the preferred habitat of older individuals, whereas the youngest lionfish use a diversity of habitats, ranging from mangroves to coral reefs. In addition, this study suggests that predation of lionfish is age-dependent strategy, and depends on time and the tone of the environment. Lionfish do not only use the head-down posture to catch prey but also horizontal and head-up postures. The youngest lionfish hunt mainly in dark areas and during the night while the older fish were observed hunting mostly during the day and in clear areas. These new aspects of lionfish ecology and behaviour are discussed in light of their invasive success.


3.
Artículo
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An arboreal spider protects its offspring by diving into the water of tank bromeliads
Hénaut, Yann ; Corbara, Bruno (coaut.) ; Azémar, Frédéric (coaut.) ; Céréghino, Régis (coaut.) ; Dézerald, Olivier (coaut.) ; Dejean, Alain (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Comptes Rendus Biologies Vol. 341, no. 3 (March 2018), p. 196-199 ISSN: 1631-0691
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Resumen en: Inglés | Frances |
Resumen en inglés

Cupiennius salei (Ctenidae) individuals frequently live in association with tank bromeliads, including Aechmea bracteata, in Quintana Roo (Mexico). Whereas C. salei females without egg sacs hunt over their entire host plant, females carrying egg sacs settle above the A. bracteata reservoirs they have partially sealed with silk. There they avoid predators that use sight to detect their prey, as is known for many bird species. Furthermore, if a danger is more acute, these females dive with their egg sacs into the bromeliad reservoir. An experiment showed that this is not the case for males or females without egg sacs. In addition to the likely abundance of prey found therein, the potential of diving into the tank to protect offspring may explain the close association of this spider with bromeliads. These results show that, although arboreal, C. salei evolved a protective behavior using the water of tank bromeliads to protect offspring.

Resumen en frances

L’araignée Cupiennius salei (Ctenidae) vit souvent en association avec la broméliacée à réservoir Aechmea bracteata. Dans le Quintana Roo (Mexique), les femelles qui transportent un cocon s’installent au-dessus d’un réservoir d’A. bracteata qu’elles obstruent partiellement de voiles de soie pour se camoufler des prédateurs. En présence de vibrations importantes et répétées, ces femelles plongent avec leur cocon dans l’eau du réservoir. Notre étude montre que les autres adultes (mâles et femelles sans cocon) n’utilisent pas les réservoirs d’eau. Ainsi, en plus de l’abondance de proies, la possibilité de pouvoir plonger pour protéger la descendance pourrait expliquer l’association entre cette espèce d’araignée et les broméliacées. Nos expériences montrent que les femelles porteuses d’un cocon manifestent une stratégie de protection vis-à-vis des cocons et d’elles-mêmes en s’immergeant durant 30, voire 90 minutes.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
A tank bromeliad favors spider presence in a neotropical inundated forest
Hénaut, Yann ; Corbara, Bruno (coaut.) ; Pélozuelo, Laurent (coaut.) ; Azémar, Frédéric (coaut.) ; Céréghino, Régis (coaut.) ; Herault, Bruno (coaut.) ; Dejean, Alain (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: PLoS One Vol. 9, no. 12, e114592 (December 2014), p. 1-13 ISSN: 1932-6203
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Tank bromeliads are good models for understanding how climate change may affect biotic associations. We studied the relationships between spiders, the epiphytic tank bromeliad, Aechmea bracteata, and its associated ants in an inundated forest in Quintana Roo, Mexico, during a drought period while, exceptionally, this forest was dry and then during the flooding that followed. We compared spider abundance and diversity between ‘Aechmea-areas’ and ‘controlareas’ of the same surface area. We recorded six spider families: the Dipluridae, Ctenidae, Salticidae, Araneidae, Tetragnathidae and Linyphiidae among which the funnel-web tarantula, Ischnothele caudata, the only Dipluridae noted, was the most abundant. During the drought period, the spiders were more numerous in the Aechmea-areas than in the control-areas, but they were not obligatorily associated with the Aechmea. During the subsequent flooding, the spiders were concentrated in the A. bracteata patches, particularly those sheltering an ant colony. Also, a kind of specificity existed between certain spider taxa and ant species, but varied between the drought period and subsequent flooding. We conclude that climatic events modulate the relationship between A. bracteata patches and their associated fauna. Tank bromeliads, previously considered only for their ecological importance in supplying food and water during drought, may also be considered refuges for spiders during flooding. More generally, tank bromeliads have an important role in preserving non-specialized fauna in inundated forests.