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24 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Chapman, Colin A.
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1.
Libro
Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors
Disponible en línea: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals.
Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (editor) ; Chapman, Colin A. (editor) ;
Geneva, Switzerland : Springer Nature Switzerland AG , 2019
Clasificación: EE/599.098 / M6
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040006971 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This book brings a unique perspective to animal movement studies because all cases came from tropical environments where the great diversity, either biological and structurally (trees, shrubs, vines, epiphytes), presents the animal with several options to fulfill its live requirements. These conditions have forced the evolution of unique movement patterns and ecological strategies. Movement is an essential process in the life of all organisms. Animals move because they are hungry, thirsty, to avoid being eaten, or because they want to find mates. Understanding the causes and consequences of animal movement is not an easy task for behavioural ecologists. Many animals are shy, move in secretive ways and are very sensible to human presence, therefore, studying the movements of mammals in tropical environments present logistical and methodological challenges that have recently started to be solved by ecologist around the world. In this book we are compiling a set of extraordinary cases where researchers have used some of the modern technology and the strongest methodological approaches to understand movement patterns in wild tropical mammals. We hope this book will inspire and encourage young researchers to investigate wild mammal´s movements in some of the amazing tropical environments of the world.

Índice

1 Why Movement Ecology Matters
2 The Impact of Hurricane Otto on Baird’s Tapir Movement in Nicaragua’s Indio Maíz Biological Reserve
3 White-Lipped Peccary Home-Range Size in the Maya Forest of Guatemala and México
4 White-Lipped Peccary Movement and Range in Agricultural Lands of Central Brazil
5 Movements of White-Lipped Peccary in French Guiana
6 Spatial Ecology of a Large and Endangered Tropical Mammal: The White-Lipped Peccary in Darién, Panama
7 Movements of Neotropical Forest Deer: What Do We Know?
8 Daily Traveled Distances by the White-Tailed Deer in Relation to Seasonality and Reproductive Phenology in a Tropical Lowland of Southeastern Mexico
9 Terrestrial Locomotion and Other Adaptive Behaviors in Howler Monkeys (Alouatta pigra) Living in Forest Fragments
10 Variation in Space Use and Social Cohesion Within and Between Four Groups of Woolly Monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha poeppigii) in Relation to Fruit Availability and Mating Opportunities at the Tiputini Biodiversity Station, Ecuador
11 Home Range and Daily Traveled Distances of Highland Colombian Woolly Monkeys (Lagothrix lagothricha lugens): Comparing Spatial Data from GPS Collars and Direct Follows
12 Ranging Responses to Fruit and Arthropod Availability by a Tufted Capuchin Group (Sapajus apella) in the Colombian Amazon
13 Insights of the Movements of the Jaguar in the Tropical Forests of Southern Mexico
14 Movements and Home Range of Jaguars (Panthera onca) and Mountain Lions (Puma concolor) in a Tropical Dry Forest of Western Mexico
15 Next Moves: The Future of Neotropical Mammal Movement Ecology
Index


2.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
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Next moves: the future of neotropical mammal movement ecology
Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ; Chapman, Colin A. (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors Switzerland, Suiza : Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019 página 263-267 ISBN:978-3-030-03462-7
Bibliotecas: Campeche
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SIBE Campeche
10934-20 (Disponible)
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This book compiles a remarkable array of studies dealing with Neotropical mammal movement patterns and therefore presents a unique opportunity to analyze the state of the art of movement ecology of some of the rarest and secretive species that are top predators, important prey to those predators, and/or critical to maintaining the ecosystem services of the forest ecosystems they inhabit. In this last chapter, we attempt to summarize lessons learned from all chapters and advance the field with respect to our understanding of the causes and consequences of animal movements in tropical forests.


3.
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Why movement ecology matters
Chapman, Colin A. (autor) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors Switzerland, Suiza : Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019 páginas 1-3 ISBN:978-3-030-03462-7
Bibliotecas: Campeche
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SIBE Campeche
59372-10 (Disponible)
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The scientific discipline of “Movement Ecology” (Nathan et al. 2008) has played an important role in advancing our understanding of almost every ecological and evolutionary process, from nutrient cycling, to habitat selection, to population dynamics and community ecology. Interestingly, it has been almost a quarter of a century ago since Rodgers and Anson (1994) stated that GPS-based animal-location systems would become the standard for habitat selection studies. They were right! The data made available from GPS telemetry (i.e., sequence of GPS locations) quickly boosted the field of “Movement Ecology” (Nathan et al. 2008), and this field was also greatly advanced when the Max Planck Institute of Ornithology developed a free online database, Movebank (movebank.org), that allowed movement data from many, many species to be freely accessed and analysed (millions and millions of travel routes). Further advancements became possible with the development and use of new analytical tools to understand the rules used by the study animals to move (Ropert-Coudert and Wilson 2005; Sengupta et al. 2018).


4.
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Park isolation in anthropogenic landscapes: land change and livelihoods at park boundaries in the African Albertine Rift
Salerno, Jonathan ; Chapman, Colin A. (coaut.) ; Diem, Jeremy E. (coaut.) ; Dowhaniuk, Nicholas (coaut.) ; Goldman, Abraham (coaut.) ; MacKenzie, Catrina A. (coaut.) ; Omeja, Patrick Aria (coaut.) ; Palace, Michael W. (coaut.) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (coaut.) ; Ryan, Sadie J. (coaut.) ; Hartter, Joel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Regional Environmental Change Vol. 18, no. 3 (March 2018), p. 913–928 ISSN: 1436-3798
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Landscapes are changing rapidly in regions where rural people live adjacent to protected parks and reserves. This is the case in highland East Africa, where many parks are increasingly isolated in a matrix of small farms and settlements. In this review, we synthesize published findings and extant data sources to assess the processes and outcomes of park isolation, with a regional focus on people’s livelihoods at park boundaries in the Ugandan Albertine Rift. The region maintains exceptionally high rural population density and growth and is classified as a global biodiversity hotspot. In addition to the impacts of increasing numbers of people, our synthesis highlights compounding factors—changing climate, increasing land value and variable tenure, and declining farm yields—that accelerate effects of population growth on park isolation and widespread landscape change. Unpacking these processes at the regional scale identifies outcomes of isolation in the unprotected landscape—high frequency of human-wildlife conflict, potential for zoonotic disease transmission, land and resource competition, and declining wildlife populations in forest fragments. We recommend a strategy for the management of isolated parks that includes augmenting outreach by park authorities and supporting community needs in the human landscape, for example through healthcare services, while also maintaining hard park boundaries through traditional protectionism. Even in cases where conservation refers to biodiversity in isolated parks, landscape strategies must include an understanding of the local livelihood context in order to ensure long-term sustainable biodiversity protection.


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Primates adjust movement strategies due to changing food availability
Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ; Teichroeb, Julie A. (autora) ; Bonnell, Tyler R. (autor) ; Hernández Sarabia, Raúl Uriel (autor) ; Vickers, Sofia M. (autora) ; Serio Silva, Juan Carlos (autor) ; Sicotte, Pascale (autora) ; Chapman, Colin A. (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Behavioral Ecology Behavioral Ecology Vol. 29, no. 2 (March-April 2018), p. 368–376 ISSN: 1465-7279
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Animals are hypothesized to search their environments in predictable ways depending on the distribution of resources. Evenly distributed foods are thought to be best exploited with random Brownian movements; while foods that are patchy or unevenly distributed require non-Brownian strategies, such as Lévy walks. Thus, when food distribution changes due to seasonal variation, animals should show concomitant changes in their search strategies. We examined this issue in 6 monkey species from Africa and Mexico: 3 frugivores and 3 folivores. We hypothesized that the more patchily distributed fruit would result in frugivores showing more levy-like patterns of motion, while folivores, with their more homogenous food supply, would show Brownian patterns of motion. At least 3 and up to 5 of 6 species conformed to the overall movement pattern predicted by their primary dietary item. For folivorous black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), ursine colobus (Colobus vellerosus), and red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus), Brownian movement was supported or could not be ruled-out. Two frugivores (spider monkeys, Ateles geoffroyi yucatanensis, and gray-cheeked mangabeys, Lophocebus albigena) showed Lévy walks, as predicted, but frugivorous vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) showed a Brownian walk. Additionally, we test whether seasonal variation in the spatial availability of food support environmentally driven changes in movement patterns. Four of 5 species tested for seasonal variation showed adjustments in their search strategies between the rainy and dry seasons. This study provides support for the notion that food distribution determines search strategies and that animal movement patterns are flexible, mirroring changes in the environment.


6.
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Changing perceptions of protected area benefits and problems around Kibale National Park, Uganda
MacKenzie, Catrina A. ; Salerno, Jonathan (coaut.) ; Hartter, Joel (coaut.) ; Chapman, Colin A. (coaut.) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (coaut.) ; Mwesigye Tumusiime, David (coaut.) ; Drake, Michael (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Environmental Management Vol. 200 (September 2017), p. 217–228 ISSN: 0301-4797
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Local residents' changing perceptions of benefits and problems from living next to a protected area in western Uganda are assessed by comparing household survey data from 2006, 2009, and 2012. Findings are contextualized and supported by long-term data sources for tourism, protected area-based employment, tourism revenue sharing, resource access agreements, and problem animal abundance. We found decreasing perceived benefit and increasing perceived problems associated with the protected area over time, with both trends dominated by increased human-wildlife conflict due to recovering elephant numbers. Proportions of households claiming benefit from specific conservation strategies were increasing, but not enough to offset crop raiding. Ecosystem services mitigated perceptions of problems. As human and animal populations rise, wildlife authorities in Sub-Saharan Africa will be challenged to balance perceptions and adapt policies to ensure the continued existence of protected areas. Understanding the dynamic nature of local people's perceptions provides a tool to adapt protected area management plans, prioritize conservation resources, and engage local communities to support protected areas.


7.
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Primate population dynamics: variation in abundance over space and time
Chapman, Colin A. ; Bortolamiol, Sarah (coaut.) ; Matsuda, Ikki (coaut.) ; Omeja, Patrick A. (coaut.) ; Pozzan Paim, Fernanda (coaut.) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (coaut.) ; Sengupta, Raja (coaut.) ; Valenta, Kim (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biodiversity and Conservation Vol. 27, no. 5 (April 2018), p. 1221–1238 ISSN: 0960-3115
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The rapid disappearance of tropical forests, the potential impacts of climate change, and the increasing threats of bushmeat hunting to wildlife, makes it imperative that we understand wildlife population dynamics. With long-lived animals this requires extensive, long-term data, but such data is often lacking. Here we present longitudinal data documenting changes in primate abundance over 45 years at eight sites in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Complex patterns of change in primate abundance were dependent on site, sampling year, and species, but all species, except blue monkeys, colonized regenerating forest, indicating that park-wide populations are increasing. At two paired sites, we found that while the primate populations in the regenerating forests had increased from nothing to a substantial size, there was little evidence of a decline in the source populations in old-growth forest, with the possible exception of mangabeys at one of the paired sites. Censuses conducted in logged forest since 1970 demonstrated that for all species, except black-and-white colobus, the encounter rate was higher in the old-growth and lightly-logged forest than in heavily-logged forest. Black-and-white colobus generally showed the opposite trend and were most common in the heavily-logged forest in all but the first year of monitoring after logging, when they were most common in the lightly-logged forest. Overall, except for blue monkey populations which are declining, primate populations in Kibale National Park are growing; in fact the endangered red colobus populations have an annual growth rate of 3%. These finding present a positive conservation message and indicate that the Uganda Wildlife Authority is being effective in managing its biodiversity; however, with constant poaching pressure and changes such as the exponential growth of elephant populations that could cause forest degradation, continued monitoring and modification of conservation plans are needed.


8.
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Safeguarding biodiversity: what is perceived as working, according to the conservation community?
Chapman, Colin A. (coaut.) ; DeLuycker, Anneke (coaut.) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (coaut.) ; Serio Silva, Juan Carlos (coaut.) ; Smith, Thomas B. (coaut.) ; Strier, Karen B. (coaut.) ; Goldberg, Tony L. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Oryx. The International Journal of Conservation Vol. 50, no. 2 (April 2016), p. 302–307 ISSN: 1365-3008
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Dramatic increases in human populations and per capita consumption, climate change, overexploitation of marine and freshwater resources, and deforestation have caused a litany of negative consequences for biodiversity. Such doom-and-gloom scenarios are widely known, frequently cited and frankly depressing. Although accurate assessments of threats have clear value for intervention planning, we believe there is also a need to reflect on successes. Such reflection provides balance to negative scenarios and may shift attention towards constructive, positive action. Here we use a systematic evaluation of 90 success stories provided by conservation scientists and practitioners to explore the characteristics of the projects perceived as being associated with success. Success was deemed to have occurred for 19.4% of the projects simply because an event had occurred (e.g. a law was passed) and for 36.1% of projects quantitative data indicated success (e.g. censuses demonstrated population increase). However, for most projects (63.9%) there was no evaluation and success was defined by the subjective opinion of the respondent. Conservation community members viewed successful projects most often as those being long-term (88%), small in spatial scale (52%), with a relatively low budget (68%), and involving a protectionist approach alone or in combination with another approach. These results highlight the subjectivity of definitions of success in conservation but also the characteristics of conservation efforts that the conservation community perceives as indicative of success.


9.
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Spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) travel to resting trees in a seasonal forest of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
Parada López, Julián ; Valenta, Kim (coaut.) ; Chapman, Colin A. (coaut.) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Folia Primatologica Vol. 87, no. 6 (2016), p. 375-380 ISSN: 0015–5713
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Resting by primates is considered an understudied activity, relative to feeding or moving, despite its importance in physiological and time investment terms. Here we describe spider monkeys’ ( Ateles geoffroyi ) travel from feeding to resting trees in a seasonal tropical forest of the Yucatan Peninsula. We followed adult and subadult individuals for as long as possible, recording their activities and spatial location to construct travel paths. Spider monkeys spent 44% of the total sampling time resting. In 49% of the cases, spider monkeys fed and subsequently rested in the same tree, whereas in the remaining cases they travelled a mean distance of 108.3 m. Spider monkeys showed high linear paths (mean linearity index = 0.77) to resting trees when they travelled longer distances than their visual field, which suggests travel efficiency and reduced travel cost. Resting activity is time consuming and affects the time available to search for food and engage in social interactions.


Resumen en español

La vida en grupos en ungulados ha evolucionado principalmente en especies que viven en áreas abiertas, tales como sabanas y pastizales, mientras que solamente algunas especies de ungulados que viven en bosques forman grupos, y estos tienden a ser pequeños. Por esta razón, el pecarí de labios blancos (Tayassu pecari), un ungulado Neotropical clasificado como Vulnerable por la UICN, representa una fenómeno social único, ya que vive en grandes grupos cohesivos, a pesar de habitar bosques tropicales densos. Se han observado grandes variaciones en los tamaños de grupo en su distribución, con reportes de manadas que varían de menos de 10 a más de 300 individuos. En este estudio examinamos los factores que pueden estar causando esta variación, incluyendo variables ecológicas y antropogénicas. Hicimos una revisión exhaustiva de la literatura y usamos nuestros datos originales para compilar información de tamaños de grupo a lo largo de su rango. Construimos modelos estadísticos para cuantificar generalizaciones para tamaños de grupos distinguiendo datos de áreas con alta presión humana (i.e. cacería) y áreas que no han recibido presión humana importante en por al menos 20 años. Encontramos que los tamaños de grupos son afectados por una combinación de la distancia al asentamiento humano más cercano y la cantidad de lluvia y su estacionalidad. Los resultados de los sitios con poca presión humana indican que los grupos más grandes se encuentran en áreas con mayor precipitación. Nuestros resultados contribuyen a entender porque los tamaños de grupo varían en diferentes ambientes que están sujetos a diferentes condiciones ecológicas y humanas. La información de estas relaciones es clave para avanzar en nuestro conocimiento de las estrategias socio-ecológicas de especies que viven en grupos.

Resumen en inglés

Group living among ungulates has evolved mainly in species living in open habitats, such as grasslands and savannas, whereas in the forest, few ungulate species form groups and these tend to be small. Therefore, the white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari), a Neotropical ungulate listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN, represents an almost unique social occurrence as it lives in large and cohesive groups, yet it inhabits dense tropical forests. Large variations in group sizes have been observed throughout the species range, with reports of herds with less than 10 to around 300 individuals. We examined factors that might cause variation in group size in white-lipped peccary, including ecological and anthropogenic variables. We conducted an extensive literature review and used our original data to compile information on white-lipped peccary's group size across its range. We built models to quantitate generalizations for group sizes distinguishing data from areas with high human influence, and areas that have not been significantly disturbed by humans for at least the last 20 years. We found that white-lipped peccary's group size for all sites was most strongly predicted by a combination of the distances to the nearest human settlement and rainfall and its seasonality. Results from the undisturbed sites indicated that group size is positively influenced by rainfall. Our results contribute to understand why group size varies in different environments that are subjected to different ecological and human conditions. Information on these relationships is a key to advance our understanding of the socio-ecological strategies of animal species living in groups.