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8 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Chowdhury, Rinku Roy
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1.
Artículo
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Governing intensification: the influence of state institutions on smallholder farming strategies in Calakmul, Mexico
Dobler Morales, Carlos (autor) ; Roy Chowdhury, Rinku (autor) ; Schmook, Birgit Inge (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Journal of Land Use Science Volumen 15, números 2-3 (May 2020), páginas 108-126 ISSN: 1747-4248
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

In forest frontiers, smallholder agrarian livelihoods remain uneasily jux-taposed with conservation interests. Agricultural intensification is often considered a viable means of reconciling competing environmental and livelihood objectives given its potential to concentrate production onless land. However, intensification may have unintended consequences, including loss of resilient agricultural systems. The risks of smallholder agricultural intensification warrant a better understanding of its drivers. This study uses the case of Calakmul, Mexico, to examine the critical role of the state in intensification processes. Drawing on household surveys and key-informant interviews, it traces the linkages between state institutions and local farming practices. Statistical and qualitative analyses reveal how intensification is both incentivized and imposed by prevailing policies, the former via subsidies and the latter via regulations against field rotations. The outcome – increased external inputs and longer cultivation periods between fallows – may undermine the sustainability of smallholders’ agroecosystems, an undesirable consequence amid limited livelihood alternatives.


Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Land system science axiomatically addresses social–environmental systems by integrating the dynamics of land uses (social) and land covers (environment), invariably including the use of remote sensing data and often, spatially explicit models of land change. This kind of research is illustrated through the Southern Yucatán Peninsular Region project (1997–2008) aimed at understanding, predicting, and projecting spatially explicit land change in a region with juxtaposed land uses-agriculture and a biosphere reserve. The successes of the project, its contributions to contemporary land system science, and the organizational mechanisms that fostered the research are identified as well as various corrections, which if applied, may have refined and extended the project's goals. Overall, the project demonstrates the kind of integrated research required to advance understanding of a social-environment system and the team-based methods used in the process.


Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Land system science axiomatically addresses social– environmental systems by integrating the dynamics of land uses (social) and land covers (environment), invariably including the use of remote sensing data and often, spatially explicit models of land change. This kind of research is illustrated through the Southern Yucata´ n Peninsular Region project (1997–2008) aimed at understanding, predicting, and projecting spatially explicit land change in a region with juxtaposed land uses-agriculture and a biosphere reserve. The successes of the project, its contributions to contemporary land system science, and the organizational mechanisms that fostered the research are identified as well as various corrections, which if applied, may have refined and extended the project’s goals. Overall, the project demonstrates the kind of integrated research required to advance understanding of a social-environment system and the team-based methods used in the process.


4.
Artículo
Agricultural livelihood transition in the southern Yucatán region: diverging paths and their accompanying land changes
Radel, Claudia (autora) ; Schmook, Birgit Inge (autora) ; Chowdhury, Rinku Roy (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Regional Environmental Change Vol. 10, no. 3 (2010), p. 205-218 ISSN: 1436-3798
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Land change science has demonstrated that rural livelihoods around the world both drive and reflect changing environmental regimes and political economic/structural transformations. This article explores the relationship between increasingly globalized rural livelihoods and in-place land change, assessing results from social surveys of smallholding households in the southern Yucatán region. We examine evidence for a transition in agricultural livelihood strategies as smallholders adjust to changing political economic and institutional conditions, and link these transitioning strategies to land use changes. Based on household surveys in 1997 and 2003, we comparatively assess both changes in the selection of livelihood strategies and in the land use and cover impacts of those strategies. Our results indicate that although impacts of given strategies have changed little over this period, there are increasing proportions of households pursuing two divergent adjustment paths—one of agricultural withdrawal and one of agricultural intensification and commercialization. We investigate what sociodemographic characteristics differentiate the groups of households following distinct livelihood strategies. Our findings point to the possibility of simultaneous and contradictory land change outcomes as smallholders adjust in different ways to their intensified incorporation into global economies.


5.
Artículo
PDF
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

En México, desde la revolución, el desarrollo agrícola para la subsistencia y el mercado ha sido una prioridad para diversos grupos, especialmente los agricultores. Durante la última década la política federal mexicana en relación a la agricultura ha cambiado de uno marcado de paternalismo hacia un modelo empresarial. Este cambio benefició a un grupo pequeño de agricultores, pero exponía la mayoría al riesgo de un fracaso económico. Por encima de los impactos en la economía doméstica, esas políticas impactaron en el uso del suelo y la cobertura de la tierra. Este estudio explora los dinámicos de la producción de chili y cómo ellos son influidos por los factores y políticas domésticos dentro el municipio de Calakmul, en Campeche, México. El chili jalapeño es el producto principal del mercado de Calakmul, desde hace poco en la frontera de desarrollo de México, pero ahora la ubicación de la reserva bioesférica más grande de México, y un paisaje en el cual las prioridades de conservación confrontan aquellas del desarrollo. Una integración de métodos cuantitativos y cualitativos permiten un mejor entendimiento de este importante y ampliando uso de suelo de la región.

Resumen en inglés

In Mexico, since the revolution of 1910, agricultural development for subsistence and market has been a priority of diverse stakeholder groups, particularly farmers. Within the last ten years, Mexican federal agricultural policy shifted from a paternalistic to an enterprise model. This shift resulted in benefits for a few farmers while placing most producers at risk of economic failure. In addition to the impacts on the household economy, these policies influence land use and land cover. This paper explores the dynamics of chili production and how these dynamics are influenced by household and policy factors in the municipality of Calakmul in Campeche, Mexico. Jalapeño chili is the foremost market crop in Calakmul, until recently a development frontier for Mexico, and now the site of the largest biosphere reserve in that country and a landscape where priorities for forest conservation meet those for agricultural development. An integration of qualitative and quantitative methods enables a more complete understanding of this important and expanding land use in the region.


6.
Libro
Integrated land-change science and tropical deforestation in the Southern Yucatán: final frontiers / edited by B. L. Turner II, Jacqueline Geoghegan and David R. Foster
Turner II, Billie Lee (editor) ; Geoghegan, Jacqueline (editora) ; Foster, David R. (editor) ;
Oxford, England, United Kingdom : Oxford University Press , 2004
Clasificación: Y/333.75137 / I5
Bibliotecas: Campeche , Chetumal , San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040002406 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030000902 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010000042 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This highly topical study of tropical deforestation in Mexico reports on the first phase of the Land-Cover and Land-Use Change in the Southern Yucatan Peninsular Region Project (LCLUC-SYPR): a large, multi-institutional, and team-based study designed to understand and project land changes in a development frontier that pits the rapidly growing needs of smallholder farmers to cut down forests for cultivation against federally sponsored initiatives committed to various international programmes of forest preservation and complementary economic programmes. The SYPR project is a response to inderdisciplinary defined research themes deemed critical to global environmental change and complementary international research agendas (e.g. environment and development, ecosystem assessment, biotic diversity). Pivotal among these agendas are those posed by the Land-Use/Cover Change (LUCC) effort of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme and the International Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change Programme as it is linked through such US sponsors as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The themes (i.e. questions and subjects) posed by these programmes and organization are 'integrated' or 'synthesis' in kind, meaning that they rest within the intersection of formal disciplines and are intended to fit into a larger, systems framework about human-environment relationships and the structure and function of the biosphere. The editors of this volume, as most of its contributors, come from the disciplines of geography, ecology, and economics. The lead editor, the geographer B. L. Turner II, has spent most of his career in pursuit of understanding different aspects of tropical deforestation and agriculture.

Índice

1. Introduction Three Frontiers of the Southern Yucatan Peninsular Region and SYPR Project
I: Human-Environment Relationships, 1000 BC - AD 1900
2. The Long View: Human-Environment Relationships 1000 BC - AD 1900
3. Forest Extraction to Theme Parks: The Modern History of Land Change
II: Land-Cover Characteristics and Change
4. Forest Types and their Implications
5. Recovery of Nutrient Cycling and Ecosystem Properties following Swidden Cultivation: Regional and Stand-Level Constraints
6. Land Cover and Land Use: Classification and Change Analysis
III: Agents and Institutions of Land Change: Household Economy and Cultivation
7. Institutions, Organizations, and Policy Affecting Land Change: Complexity Within and Beyond the Ejido
8. The Ejido Household: The Current Agent of Change
9. Subsistence Sustained: Swidden or Milpa Cultivation
10. Jalapeno Pepper Cultivation: Emergent Commercial Land Use
11. The Semi-Market and Semi-Subsistence Household: The Evidence and Test of Smallholder Behavior
IV: Spatial Modeling of Land Change: Empirical Approaches in Data-Sparse Environments
12. Spatially Explicit, Statistical Land-Change Models in Data-Sparse Conditions
13. The SYPR Integrative Assessment Model: Complexity in Development
Retrospective: The Three Frontiers Revisited
Glossary and Acronyms
Index


7.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Land cover and land use: classification and change analysis
Chowdhury, Rinku Roy (autor) ; Schneider, Laura C. (autora) ; Ogneva Himmelberger, Yelena A. (autora) ; Macario Mendoza, Pedro A. (autor) ; Cortina Villar, Héctor Sergio (autor) (1960-) ; Barker Plotkin, Audrey (autor) ;
Clasificación: AR/333.73097265 / L3
Contenido en: Integrated land-change science and tropical deforestation in the southern Yucatán: final frontiers / edited by B. L. Turner II, Jacqueline Geoghegan and David R. Foster Oxford, England, United Kingdom : Oxford University Press, 2004 páginas 105-141 ISBN:0-19-924530-4 :: 978-0-19-924530-7
Bibliotecas: Campeche , Chetumal , San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040006389 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
51924-30 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010017756 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a

8.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Modeling tropical deforestation in the southern Yucatán peninsular region: comparing survey and satellite data
Geoghegan, Jacqueline ; Cortina Villar, Héctor Sergio (coaut.) (1960-) ; Klepeis, Peter (coaut.) ; Macario Mendoza, Pedro A. (coaut.) ; Ogneva Himmelberger, Yelena A. (coaut.) ; Roy Chowdhury, Rinku (coaut.) ; Turner II, Billie Lee (coaut.) ; Vance, Colin (coaut.) ;
Clasificación: AR/333.75137 / M6
Contenido en: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment Vol. 85, no. 1-3 (June 2001), p. 25-46 ISSN: 0167-8809
Bibliotecas: Campeche , San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040001672 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010005133 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This paper presents some initial modeling results from a large, interdisciplinary research project underway in the southern Yucatán peninsular region. The aims of the project are: to understand, through individual household surveywork, the behavioral and structural dynamics that influence land managers’ decisions to deforest and intensify land use; model these dynamics and link their outcomes directly to satellite imagery; model from the imagery itself; and, determine the robustness of modeling to and from the satellite imagery. Two complementary datasets, one from household survey data on agricultural practices including information on socio-economic factors and the second from satellite imagery linked with aggregate government census data, are used in two econometric modeling approaches. Both models test hypotheses concerning deforestation during different time periods in the recent past in the region. The first uses the satellite data, other spatial environmental variables, and aggregate socio-economic data (e.g., census data) in a discrete-choice (logit) model to estimate the probability that any particular pixel in the landscape will be deforested, as a function of explanatory variables. The second model uses the survey data in a cross-sectional regression (OLS) model to ask questions about the amount of deforestation associated with each individual farmer and to explain these choices as a function of individual socio-demographic, market, environmental, and geographic variables. In both cases, however, the choices of explanatory variables are informed by social science theory as to what are hypothesized to affect the deforestation decision (e.g., in a von Thünen model, accessibility is hypothesized to affect choice; in a Ricardian model, land quality; in a Chayanovian model, consumer–labor ratio).

The models ask different questions using different data, but several broad comparisons seem useful. While most variables are statistically significant in the discrete choice model, none of the location variables are statistically significant in the continuous model. Therefore, while location affects the overall probability of deforestation, it does not appear to explain the total amount of deforestation on a given location by an individual.