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4 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Fedick, Scott L.
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1.
Capítulo de libro - Memoria en extenso
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Wetland environments and ancient maya management systems of the near-coastal eastern Yucatan Peninsula: a comparison of northern Belize and northern Quintana Roo, Mexico
Fedick, Scott L. ; Chmilar, Jennifer (coaut.) ; Islebe, Gerald A. (coaut.) ; Leonard, Daniel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Research Reports in Belizean Archaeology Volume 9. Archaeological Investigations in the Eastern Maya Lowlands: Papers of the 2011 Belize Archaeology Symposium Belmopan, Belize : Institute of Archaeology, National Institute of Culture and History, 2012 p. 289-295 ISBN:9789768197573
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Two major freshwater wetland systems of the eastern Maya Lowlands are the riverine-associated wetlands around the New and Hondo Rivers of northern Belize, and the wetlands of the Yalahau region of northern Quintana Roo, Mexico, which are found in karstic depressions associated with the Holbox fracture zone. Both of these wetland systems are linked directly to the freshwater aquifers of the respective regions. In northern Belize the nature and timing of ancient Maya manipulation of the wetlands has been a source of long-standing debate. It has been suggested that ancient Maya use of wetlands in northern Belize has been significantly impacted by changes in the water table resulting primarily from changes in sea level. Recent and ongoing research in the Yalahau region has documented widespread evidence for manipulation of the wetlands by the ancient Maya, as well as evidence from wetland sediment studies that indicate a highly dynamic hydrological history. Comparing the historical ecology of the two major wetland systems has implications for the trajectories of ancient settlement and economic change in the eastern Maya Lowlands.


2.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Adaptation of maya homegardens by container gardening in limestone bedrock cavities
Fedick, Scott L. (coaut.) ; Flores Delgadillo, María de Lourdes (coaut.) ; Sedov, Sergey (coaut.) ; Solleiro Rebolledo, Elizabeth (coaut.) ; Palacios Mayorga, Sergio (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Ethnobiology Vol. 28, no. 2 (Fall-Winter 2008), p. 290-304 ISSN: 0278-0771
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
47066-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Español | Inglés | Frances |
Resumen en español

El norte de las tierras bajas mayas de la Península de Yucatán ha sido caracterizado por observadores externos como un reto ambiental para los agricultores. La plataforma de roca caliza parece tener sólo una delgada y desigual cobertura de sedimento, aun así, los habitantes mayas, tanto antiguos como modernos, han logrado cultivar con éxito este paisaje a través de una variedad de técnicas innovadoras y adaptaciones a micro escala. Los jardines domésticos tienen una larga historia en la región, y continúan hoy en día proporcionando la mayor parte de la diversidad en la dieta Maya. La adaptación de los jardines domésticos a los delgados sedimentos de la zona septentrional de la península puede ser descrita de una mejor manera como maceteros, en donde las cavidades naturales de la roca caliza sirven como contenedores. Los profundos y verticales horizontes de las cavidades rocosas no son reconocidos en la caracterización regional de los suelos, sin embargo pueden representar el principal recurso para la adaptación doméstica en regiones del norte de las tierras bajas mayas.

Resumen en inglés

The northern Maya Lowlands of the Yucatán Peninsula are often characterized by outside observers as a challenging environment for agriculturalists. The limestone bedrock appears to have only a patchy cover of thin soil, yet the Maya inhabitants, both ancient and modern, have managed to successfully cultivate this landscape through a variety innovative techniques and micro-scale adaptations. Homegardens have a long history in the region, and continue today to provide most of the diversity in the Maya diet. Adaptation of Maya homegardeners to the thin soil of the northern peninsula may best be described as container gardening, in which natural cavities in the limestone bedrock serve as planters. The deep, vertical A-horizons of the bedrock cavities are not recognized in regional characterization of the soil, yet they may represent the primary soil resource for homegarden adaptation in portions of the northern Maya Lowlands.

Resumen en frances

Les plaines Maya du nord de la Péninsule Yucatan sont souvent caractérisées par les observateurs extérieurs comme un environnement de défi pour les agriculteurs. La roche calcaire est inégalement couverte d'un sol peu épais, mais les habitants Mayas, anciens autant que modernes, ont réussi à cultiver ce paysage au moyen d'une variété de techniques innovantes et d'adaptation à petite échelle. Les méthodes d'agriculture intensives ont une longue histoire dans la région, et continuent aujourd'hui de fournir la plupart du régime alimentaire Maya. L'agriculture à conteneurs, dans laquelle les cavités naturelles des roches calcaires servent de pot, peut décrire le mieux la manière dont les Mayas se sont adaptés aux sols peu épais du nord de la péninsule. Les A horizons verticales et profondes des cavités rocheuses ne sont pas reconnues dans la caractérisation régionale des sols, mais ils peuvent représenter le premier sol de ressource pour l'adaptation de l'agriculture intensive dans certaines parties des plaines Maya du nord.


3.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Ancient use and manipulation of landscape in the Yalahau region of the northern Maya lowlands
Scott L. Fedick ; Morrison, Bethany A. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Agriculture and Human Values Vol. 21, no. 3-4, (summer-fall 2004), p. 207-219 ISSN: 0889-048X
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B2873 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal

4.
- Libro con arbitraje
The lowland maya area: three millennia at the human-wildland interface / Arturo Gómez-Pompa, Michael Allen, Scott L. Fedick, Juan José Jiménez-Osornio, editors
Gómez Pompa, Arturo (editor) (1934-) ; Allen, Michael F. (editor) ; Fedick, Scott L. (editor) ; Jiménez Osornio, Juan José María (editor) ;
New York, New York, United States : Food Products Press , 2003
Clasificación: Y/304.20972 / L6
Bibliotecas: Campeche , Chetumal
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040005142 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030000909 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Integrating history, biodiversity, ethnobotany, geology, ecology, archaeology, anthropology, and other disciplines, The Lowland Maya Area is a valuable guide to the fascinating relationship between man and his environment in the Yucatán peninsula. This book covers virtually every aspect of the biology and ecology of the Maya Lowlands and the many ways that human beings have interacted with their surroundings in that area for the last three thousand years. You'll learn about newly discovered archaeological evidence of wetland use; the domestication and use of cacao and henequen plants; a biodiversity assessment of a select group of plants, animals, and microorganisms; the area's forgotten cotton, indigo, and wax industries; the ecological history of the Yucatán Peninsula; and much more. This comprehensive book will open your eyes to all that we can learn from the Maya people, who continue to live on their native lands, integrating modern life with their old ways and teaching valuable lessons about human dependence on and management of environmental resources."