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15 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Galindo González, Jorge
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1.
Artículo
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Known and estimated distribution in Mexico of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a pathogenic fungus of amphibians
Bolom Huet, René (autor) ; Pineda, Eduardo (autor) ; Díaz Fleischer, Francisco (autor) ; Muñoz Alonso, Luis Antonio (autor) ; Galindo González, Jorge (autor) ;
Contenido en: Biotropica Vol. 51, no. 5 (September 2019), p. 731–746 ISSN: 1744-7429
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Chytridiomycosis caused by fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is one of the decline global causes of amphibians. Currently, it is distributed throughout a broad range of climates and ecosystems around the world. An epidemic wave of chytridiomycosis began in North America, resulting in population decline and local extinction of many species, reconfiguring species composition of amphibian communities in the Americas. In Mexico, Bd has caused an amphibian population decrease, and its potential distribution area has not been determined. We reviewed the number of species infected, obtaining Bd frequency of infection by land use and vegetation type, and by elevation range. We examined the known distribution of Bd, estimated the potential distribution, and obtained the bioclimate variables relevant for Bd. Our results indicate that in Mexico, Bd has been detected in 78 species of amphibians in 10 families, from 29 different land use and vegetation types, with cloud forest having the highest number of cases (139) and infected species (15). Bd occurs over an elevation range of 1–3,300 m asl and is most frequent at 1,200–1,500 m asl (36%). In addition to the regions previously described as suitable for Bd, our model included desert, coastal, and tropical forest regions, revealing an increase in the area where amphibians could be at risk of infection. Distribution of Bd is mainly associated with temperature of the wettest quarter and potential evapotranspiration of the warmer quarter. We offer an estimate of the ideal conditions for Bd in Mexico, also information for future studies on Bd and the conservation of amphibians.


2.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Species can co-exist within a community when their use of limiting resources is differentiated. To test whether differentiation facilitates coexistence, we quantified differences and overlap in habitat use, fruit consumption, morphological characteristics, and the relationship with vegetation structure for two pairs of ecologically similar frugivorous bat species, Carollia sowelli and C. perspicillata, and Artibeus jamaicensis and A. lituratus. In Carollia sowelli and C. perspicillata, differences in body mass and wing aspect ratio were not reflected in differences in fruit or habitat use (diet overlap, 96 percent; habitat overlap, 98 percent). However, the capture rate of Carollia sowelli positively correlated with canopy openness, and that of C. perspicillata positively correlated with tree height. Body mass and wing characteristics of Artibeus species suggested a greater maneuverability for A. jamaicensis. Also, more A. jamaicensis individuals were captured feeding on Ficus spp., while Artibeus lituratus preferred fruits of the early successional tree Cecropia. However, both habitat overlap and diet overlap were higher than by chance (diet overlap, 75 percent; habitat overlap, 92 percent). The co-existence of the four bat species in the study area may be facilitated by the abundance of the food resources forming part of the diets of both Carollia species, by the morphological differences between the Artibeus species, which allow the differentiation of foraging behavior in relation to fruit consumption, and by the structural characteristics of the vegetation.


3.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Positive effects of surrounding rainforest on composition, diversity and late-successional seed dispersal by bats
Vleut, Ivar Joeri Joannes ; Levy Tacher, Samuel Israel (coaut.) ; Galindo González, Jorge (coaut.) ; de Boer, Willem Frederik (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Basic and Applied Ecology Vol. 16, no. 4 (June 2015), p. 308–315 ISSN: 1439-1791
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The configuration of a heterogeneous landscape has an important effect on species composition and landscape processes. The importance of the size, shape and habitat suitability of forest patches has been widely studied, but there is increasing evidence that the spatial context, e.g. adjacency or contact between two landscape elements, can have positive effects on ecological interactions, such as the movement of frugivorous bat species and seed dispersal. We compared the composition, diversity and richness of seed species transported by bats in rainforests and in secondary forests that were either partially or largely surrounded by rainforest, in relation to the fruit species’ life form and successional stage. To capture frugivorous bats we used mist nets with a plastic sheet placed below to allow dropped fruit and seeds from bat feces to be retrieved. Similar species composition and the highest diversity of transported seeds were found in rainforest and secondary forest largely surrounded by rainforest, while the highest number of seed species was recorded in rainforest and secondary forest partially surrounded by rainforest. More bats were captured transporting late-successional stage seeds in secondary forest largely surrounded by rainforest. This study demonstrates the importance of rainforest surrounding secondary forests to bat species’ movement and its positive effect on diversity and late-successional seed dispersal by bats. Maintaining large areas of rainforest around secondary forests is a useful management strategy for supporting high bat species diversity and abundance, and positively affects the transportation and potential dispersal of seed species of different successional stages.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Can a fast-growing early-successional tree (Ochroma pyramidale, Malvaceae) accelerate forest succession?
Vleut, Ivar Joeri Joannes ; Levy Tacher, Samuel Israel (coaut.) ; de Boer, Willem Frederik (coaut.) ; Galindo González, Jorge (coaut.) ; Ramírez Marcial, Neptalí (coaut.) (1963-) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Tropical Ecology Vol. 29, no. 2 (March 2013), p. 173-180 ISSN: 0266-4674
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
52555-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Species-specific traits of trees affect ecosystem dynamics, defining forest structure and understorey development. Ochroma pyramidale is a fast-growing tree species, with life-history traits that include low wood density, short-lived large leaves and a narrow open thin crown. We evaluated forest succession in O. pyramidale-dominated secondary forests, diverse secondary forests, both 10–15 y since abandonment, and rain forests by comparing height, density and basal area of all trees (> 5 cm dbh). Furthermore, we compared species richness of understorey trees and shrubs, and basal area and density of trees of early- and late-successional species (< 5 cm dbh) between forest types. We found that tree basal area (mean ± SD: 32 ± 0.9 m2 ha−1) and height (12.4 ± 1.8 m) of canopy trees were higher, and density (1450 ± 339 ha−1) lower in O. pyramidale forests than in diverse forests, and more similar to rain forest. Understorey shrub diversity and tree seedling density and diversity were lower in O. pyramidale forests than in diverse forests, but these forest types had a similar density of early- and late-successional trees. Canopy openness (> 15%) and leaf litter (> 10 cm) were both highest in O. pyramidale forests, which positively affected density of understorey trees and shrubs and negatively affected density of late-successional trees. In conclusion, O. pyramidale forests presented structural features similar to those of rain forest, but this constrained the establishment of understorey tree species, especially late-successional species, decreasing successional development.


5.
Tesis - Doctorado
Factores determinantes sobre la presencia de murciélagos en bosques secundarios bajo manejo tradicional en Lacanhá, Selva Lacandona, Chiapas, México / Ivar Joeri Joannes Vleut
Vleut, Ivar Joeri Joannes ; Levy Tacher, Samuel Israel (tutor) ; Ramírez Marcial, Neptalí (asesor) (1963-) ; Vázquez Hernández, Luis Bernardo (asesor) ; Galindo González, Jorge (asesor) ;
San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas, México : El Colegio de la Frontera Sur , 2013
Clasificación: TE/599.45097275 / V5
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040005015 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030007762 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010016367 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020012857 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
ECO050005312 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
PDF
Índice | Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

El paisaje en la comunidad de Lacanhá-Chansayab en Chiapas, México es excepcional dentro del contexto regional, al presentar una matriz de selva interrumpida por pequeñas áreas de milpas o vegetación secundaria. Este paisaje heterogéneo, determina la estructura de la comunidad de los murciélagos, en términos de la disponibilidad de alimento y refugios. La presente tesis se enfocó en evaluar y analizar el efecto de la matriz de selva sobre la comunidad de murciélagos y la dispersión de semillas en parches de bosque secundario bajo manejo tradicional lacandón. El primer objetivo de la tesis fue evaluar la diversidad, abundancia, riqueza y la contribución a la diversidad total de los murciélagos en bosques secundarios, dominados por O. pyramidale y rodeados parcial (<35%) y mayormente (>85%) por selva. También, se evaluó la estructura y composición de la vegetación secundaria y de las áreas con selva en relación con la presencia de los murciélagos. El segundo objetivo fue evaluar la diversidad y abundancia de semillas dispersadas por murciélagos en la selva y parches de bosque secundario con diferente proporción de selva circundante, y se relacionó la disponibilidad de alimento con la dispersión de semillas. La diversidad y riqueza de los murciélagos fueron mayores en la selva, y la diversidad de murciélagos entre la selva y los parches de bosque secundario mayormente rodeados de selva fue similar. El bosque secundario parcialmente rodeado de selva presentó una menor diversidad en relación con las otras condiciones. La diversidad y riqueza de murciélagos y la contribución total a la diversidad estuvieron correlacionadas positivamente con la proporción de selva que rodea a los bosques secundarios, mientras que la abundancia de murciélagos fue positivamente correlacionada con la cobertura de dosel.

La diversidad y riqueza de semillas dispersadas por los murciélagos en la selva fue similar a la encontrada en parches rodeados mayormente por selva. Además, en estas condiciones se encontró una mayor abundancia de murciélagos dispersando semillas de especies sucesionales tardías en comparación con la registrada en los parches parcialmente rodeados por selva, donde los murciélagos dispersaron principalmente semillas de arbustos y árboles de etapas sucesionales tempranas. Dos murciélagos frugívoros grandes (Artibeus lituratus y A. jamaicensis) fueron más abundantes en la selva y parches mayormente rodeados por selva. Estas especies dispersaron semillas de árboles de diferentes etapas sucesionales como Cecropia spp, Ficus spp y Brosimum alicastrum. En cambio la dispersión de semillas por los murciélagos pequeños (Carollia sowelli y C. perspicillata) en bosques secundarios con menor proporción de selva, fue dominada por especies de etapas sucesionales tempranas (Piper auritum y Piper aduncum). Para ambos procesos es probable que los murciélagos contribuyan con la dispersión de semillas que favorece la regeneración de la selva.

Índice

Agradecimientos
Resumen general
Capítulo I
Introducción
Objetivo general
Hipótesis generales
Objetivos particulares
Descripción general del área de estudio
Capítulo II
Efecto de la calidad de la matriz de la selva en la estructura del ensamble de murciélagos en parches de bosque secundario
Tropical rainforest matrix quality affects bat assemblage structure in secondary forest patches
Abstract
Introduction
Material and Methods
Results
Discussion
Acknowledgements
Literature cited
Tables and figures
Appendix 1
Capítulo III
Efecto de la matriz de selva en la dispersión de semillas por murciélagos en parches de bosque secundario
Rainforest Matrix affects seed dispersal by bats in secondary forest patches
Abstract
Introduction
Methods
Results
Discussion
Acknowledgements
Reference list
Tables and figures
Appendix
Capítulo IV
Discusión 95 Conclusiones
Recomendaciones
Literatura citada


6.
- Artículo con arbitraje
PDF PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Most studies on frugivorous bat assemblages in secondary forests have concentrated on differences among successional stages, and have disregarded the effect of forest management. Secondary forest management practices alter the vegetation structure and fruit availability, important factors associated with differences in frugivorous bat assemblage structure, and fruit consumption and can therefore modify forest succession. Our objective was to elucidate factors (forest structural variables and fruit availability) determining bat diversity, abundance, composition and species-specific abundance of bats in (i) secondary forests managed by Lacandon farmers dominated by Ochroma pyramidale, in (ii) secondary forests without management, and in (iii) mature rain forests in Chiapas, Southern Mexico. Frugivorous bat species diversity (Shannon H’) was similar between forest types. However, bat abundance was highest in rain forest and O. pyramidale forests. Bat species composition was different among forest types with more Carollia sowelli and Sturnira lilium captures in O. pyramidale forests. Overall, bat fruit consumption was dominated by early-successional shrubs, highest late-successional fruit consumption was found in rain forests and more bats consumed early-successional shrub fruits in O. pyramidale forests. Ochroma pyramidale forests presented a higher canopy openness, tree height, lower tree density and diversity of fruit than secondary forests. Tree density and canopy openness were negatively correlated with bat species diversity and bat abundance, but bat abundance increased with fruit abundance and tree height. Hence, secondary forest management alters forests’ structural characteristics and resource availability, and shapes the frugivorous bat community structure, and thereby the fruit consumption by bats.


7.
Libro
Memoria: I simpósium internacional en producción agroalimentaria y XXIV reunión científica-tecnológica forestal y agropecuaria 2012 / coordinación general: Eduardo Daniel Bolaños Aguilar ; edición, compilación y formación: Eduardo Daniel Bolaños Aguilar, ... [et al.]
Simpósium internacional en producción agroalimentaria y XXIV reunión científica-tecnológica forestal y agropecuaria 2012 (I : 2012 : Cárdenas, Tabasco) ; Bolaños Aguilar, Eduardo Daniel (coord.) ;
Cáardenas, Tabasco, México : Secretaría de Agricultura Ganadería y Desarrollo Rural Pesca y Alimentación :: Gobierno del Estado de Tabasco , 2012
Clasificación: T/630.09137263 / S5
Bibliotecas: Villahermosa
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
ECO050005320 (Disponible) , ECO050005319 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2

8.
- Artículo con arbitraje
La red internacional de inventarios forestales (Biotree-net) en Mesoamérica: avances, retos y perspectivas futuras
Cayuela Delgado, Luis ; Gálvez Bravo, Lucía (coaut.) ; Albuquerque, Fabio S. de (coaut.) ; Golicher, Duncan John (coaut.) ; González Espinosa, Mario (coaut.) (1950-) ; Ramírez Marcial, Neptalí (coaut.) (1963-) ; Rey Benayas, José María (coaut.) ; Zahawi, Rakan A. (coaut.) ; Meave, Jorge A. (coaut.) ; Benito, B. M. (coaut.) ; Garibaldi Escobar, Cristina (coaut.) ; Chan, I. (coaut.) ; Pérez Pérez, R. (coaut.) ; Field, Richard (coaut.) ; Balvanera, Patricia (coaut.) ; Castillo Santiago, Miguel Ángel (coaut.) ; Figueroa Rangel, Blanca Lorena (coaut.) ; Griffith, Daniel M. (coaut.) ; Islebe, Gerald A. (coaut.) ; Kelly, Daniel Lucius (coaut.) ; Olvera Vargas, Miguel (coaut.) ; Schnitzer, Stefan A. (coaut.) ; Velázquez, E. (coaut.) ; Williams Linera, Guadalupe (coaut.) ; Brewer, Steven W. (coaut.) ; Camacho Cruz, Angélica (coaut.) ; Coronado, Indiana (coaut.) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (coaut.) ; Castillo, R. del (coaut.) ; Granzow de la Cerda, Iñigo (coaut.) ; Fernández, J. (coaut.) ; Fonseca, William (coaut.) ; Galindo Jaimes, Luis (coaut.) ; Gillespie, Thomas W. (coaut.) ; González Rivas, Benigno (coaut.) ; Gordon, John E. (coaut.) ; Hurtado, Johanna (coaut.) ; Linares Alonso, Antonio (coaut.) ; Letcher, Susan G. (coaut.) ; Mangan, Scott A. (coaut.) ; Méndez, V. Ernesto (coaut.) ; Meza, Víctor (coaut.) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (coaut.) ; Peterson, Chris J. (coaut.) ; Ruiz Gutiérrez, Viviana (coaut.) ; Snarr, Kymberley A. (coaut.) ; Tun Dzul, Fernando Jesús (coaut.) ; Valdéz Hernández, Mirna (coaut.) ; Viergever, Karin M. (coaut.) ; White, David A. (coaut.) ; Williams, J. N. (coaut.) ; Bonet, Francisco J. (coaut.) ; Zamora, Regino (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ecosistemas Vol. 21, no. 1-2 (enero-agosto 2012), p. 126-135 ISSN: 1697-2473
PDF
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Los esfuerzos de conservación en la región neotropical están limitados por la falta de información disponible sobre las especies, ya que muchas no han sido descritas o se tiene poca información sobre ellas. La Red Internacional de Inventarios Forestales (BIOTREE-NET) concentra y facilita el acceso a la información y el intercambio entre investigadores, gestores y conservacionistas, organizando y estandarizando los datos de especies de árboles procedentes de inventarios forestales en la región mesoamericana en una única base de datos que incluya información espacial. Este artículo explica el ámbito y objetivos de la red, describe la estructura de la base de datos e identifica los principales avances realizados, así como los retos y perspectivas futuras. La base de datos contiene más de 50 000 registros de árboles de unas 5000 especies, distribuidas en más de 2000 parcelas muestreadas desde el suroeste de México hasta Panamá. La información es heterogénea, tanto en su naturaleza y forma como en la cobertura geográfica de los inventarios. La base de datos tiene una estructura relacional, con 12 tablas interconectadas, incluyendo información sobre las parcelas, los nombres de las especies, el diámetro a la altura del pecho de los árboles medidos y sus atributos funcionales. Se ha desarrollado un sistema para la corrección de errores tipográficos y la estandarización taxonómica y nomenclatural utilizando como referencia The Plant List (http://theplantlist.org/). También se han generado modelos de distribución potencial para cerca de 1700 especies utilizando distintos métodos y en el futuro se prevé habilitar también el acceso público a los modelos de distribución de especies a través del portal web (http://portal.biotreenet.com).

Aunque BIOTREE-NET ha contribuido al desarrollo de mejores modelos de distribución, su mayor potencial radica, en nuestra opinión, en el estudio a nivel de comunidades. Finalmente, se reconoce la necesidad de expandir la red a través de la participación de más investigadores interesados en colaborar con datos para ampliar el conocimiento sobre la biodiversidad forestal en la región neotropical.

Resumen en inglés

Conservation efforts in Neotropical regions are often hindered by lack of data, since for many species there is a vacuum of information, and many species have not even been described yet. The International Network of Forest Inventory Plots (BIOTREE-NET) gathers and facilitates access to tree data from forest inventory plots in Mesoamerica, while encouraging data exchange between researchers, managers and conservationists. The information is organised and standardised into a single database that includes spatially explicit data. This article describes the scope and objectives of the network, its progress, and the challenges and future perspectives. The database includes above 50 000 tree records of over 5000 species from more than 2000 plots distributed from southern Mexico through to Panama. Information is heterogeneous, both in nature and shape, as well as in the geographical coverage of inventory plots. The database has a relational structure, with 12 inter-connected tables that include information about plots, species names, dbh, and functional attributes of trees. A new system that corrects typographical errors and achieves taxonomic and nomenclatural standardization was developed using The Plant List (http://theplantlist.org/) as reference. Species distribution models have been computed for around 1700 species using different methods, and they will be publicly accessible through the web site in the future (http://portal.biotreenet.com). Although BIOTREE-NET has contributed to the development of improved species distribution models, its main potential lies, in our opinion, in studies at the community level. Finally, we emphasise the need to expand the network and encourage researchers willing to share data and to join the network and contribute to the generation of further knowledge about forest biodiversity in Neotropical regions.


9.
- Artículo con arbitraje
The Tree Biodiversity Network (BIOTREE-NET): prospects for biodiversity research and conservation in the Neotropics
Cayuela Delgado, Luis ; Gálvez Bravo, Lucía (coaut.) ; Pérez Pérez, Juan Ramón (coaut.) ; Albuquerque, Fabio S. de (coaut.) ; Golicher, Duncan John (coaut.) ; Zahawi, Rakan A. (coaut.) ; Ramírez Marcial, Neptalí (coaut.) (1963-) ; Garibaldi Escobar, Cristina (coaut.) ; Field, Richard (coaut.) ; Rey Benayas, José María (coaut.) ; González Espinosa, Mario (coaut.) (1950-) ; Balvanera, Patricia (coaut.) ; Castillo Santiago, Miguel Ángel (coaut.) ; Figueroa Rangel, Blanca Lorena (coaut.) ; Griffith, Daniel M. (coaut.) ; Islebe, Gerald A. (coaut.) ; Kelly, Daniel L. (coaut.) ; Olvera Vargas, Miguel (coaut.) ; Schnitzer, Stefan A. (coaut.) ; Velázquez, Eduardo (coaut.) ; Williams Linera, Guadalupe (coaut.) ; Brewer, Steven W. (coaut.) ; Camacho Cruz, Angélica (coaut.) ; Coronado, Indiana (coaut.) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (coaut.) ; Del Castillo Sánchez, Rafael Felipe (coaut.) ; Granzow de la Cerda, Iñigo (coaut.) ; Fernández, Javier (coaut.) ; Fonseca, William (coaut.) ; Galindo Jaimes, Luis (coaut.) ; Gillespie, Thomas W. (coaut.) ; González Rivas, Benigno (coaut.) ; Gordon, James E. (coaut.) ; Hurtado, Johanna (coaut.) ; Linares, José (coaut.) ; Letcher, Susan G. (coaut.) ; Mangan, Scott A. (coaut.) ; Meave, Jorge A. (coaut.) ; Méndez, Ernesto V. (coaut.) ; Meza, Víctor (coaut.) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (coaut.) ; Peterson, Chris J. (coaut.) ; Ruiz Gutiérrez, Viviana (coaut.) ; Snarr, Kymberley A. (coaut.) ; Tun Dzul, Fernando Jesús (coaut.) ; Valdéz Hernández, Mirna (coaut.) ; Viergever, Karin M. (coaut.) ; White, David A. (coaut.) ; Williams, John N. (coaut.) ; Bonet, Francisco J. (coaut.) ; Zamora, Regino (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biodiversity and Ecology Vol. 4, (2012), p. 211-224 ISSN: 1613-9801
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Biodiversity research and conservation efforts in the tropics are hindered by the lack of knowledge of the assemblages found there, with many species undescribed or poorly known. Our initiative, the Tree Biodiversity Network (BIOTREE-NET), aims to address this problem by assembling georeferenced data from a wide range of sources, making these data easily accessible and easily queried, and promoting data sharing. The database (GIVD ID NA-00-002) currently comprises ca. 50,000 tree records of ca. 5,000 species (230 in the IUCN Red List) from >2,000 forest plots in 11 countries. The focus is on trees because of their pivotal role in tropical forest ecosystems (which contain most of the world's biodiversity) in terms of ecosystem function, carbon storage and effects on other species. BIOTREE-NET currently focuses on southern Mexico and Central America, but we aim to expand coverage to other parts of tropical America. The database is relational, comprising 12 linked data tables. We summarise its structure and contents. Key tables contain data on forest plots (including size, location and date(s) sampled), individual trees (including diameter, when available, and both recorded and standardised species name), species (including biological traits of each species) and the researchers who collected the data. Many types of queries are facilitated and species distribution modelling is enabled. Examining the data in BIOTREE-NET to date, we found an uneven distribution of data in space and across biomes, reflecting the general state of knowledge of the tropics. More than 90% of the data were collected since 1990 and plot size varies widely, but with most less than one hectare in size. A wide range of minimum sizes is used to define a 'tree'. The database helps to identify gaps that need filling by further data collection and collation.


10.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Chetumal
Tropical rain-forest matrix quality affects bat assemblage structure in secondary forest patches
Vleut, Ivar Joeri Joannes ; Levy Tacher, Samuel Israel (coaut.) ; Galindo González, Jorge (coaut.) ; de Boer, Willem Frederik (coaut.) ; Ramírez Marcial, Neptalí (coaut.) (1963-) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Mammalogy Vol. 93, no. 6 (2012), p. 1469-1479 ISSN: 0022-2372
Bibliotecas: Chetumal
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
37395-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Chetumal
Resumen en español

Estudiamos el ensamble de murciélagos de la familia Phyllostomidae en parches de vegetación secundaria dominada por árboles pioneros de Ochroma pyramidale (Malvaceae) en dos condiciones de vegetación circundante, aquellos mayormente rodeados por una matriz de bosque tropical (>85%), y los rodeados parcialmente (<35%). Se testearon 3 hipótesis: la matriz de bosque tropical que rodea parches de vegetación secundaria presenta una mayor diversidad y riqueza de murciélagos en comparación con la vegetación secundaria; la proporción de bosque tropical que rodea a la vegetación secundaria favorece la diversidad, riqueza y abundancia de murciélagos sensibles al disturbio; y el incremento en la apertura del dosel disminuye la abundancia de murciélagos. Los sitios de control de bosque tropical, presentaron la mayor diversidad y riqueza de murciélagos y contribuyeron mayormente a la diversidad total. En los parches de vegetación secundaria mayormente rodeados de bosque tropical se encontró que la diversidad de murciélagos fue similar a las áreas de control de bosque tropical. Sin embargo, los parches de vegetación secundaria mayormente rodeados por bosque tropical presentaron mayor diversidad y riqueza de murciélagos y contribuyeron a la diversidad total en comparación con parches de vegetación secundaria parcialmente rodeados por bosque tropical.

Los parches de vegetación secundaria parcialmente rodeados por bosque tropical, estuvieron dominados por 2 especies murciélagos frugívoros pequeños característicos de la vegetación secundaria (Carollia sowelli y Carollia perspicillata) mientras que los parches mayormente rodeados por bosque estuvieron dominados por 2 especies de murciélagos frugívoros grandes (Artibeus lituratus y Artibeus jamaicensis), típicos de vegetación madura que se alimentan principalmente de higos (Ficus spp.), un árbol abundante del bosque tropical. La diversidad, riqueza y la contribución total a la diversidad estuvieron correlacionadas positivamente con la proporción de bosque tropical, mientras que la abundancia de murciélagos fue negativamente correlacionada con la apertura de dosel.

Resumen en inglés

We studied Phyllostomidae bat assemblage structure in patches of secondary forest dominated by the pioneer tree Ochroma pyramidale, largely (>85%) or partially (<35%) surrounded by a matrix of tropical rain forest, to test 3 hypotheses: the highest bat diversity and richness is observed in the matrix rain forest in comparison to secondary forest patches; the proportion of rain forest surrounding secondary forest positively affects bat diversity and richness; and canopy openness is an important structural variable negatively affecting bat abundance. Rain-forest control sites had the highest bat species diversity and richness, and contributed more to total diversity than did secondary forest. Bat diversity was similar between secondary forest patches largely enclosed by rain forest and their controls, but higher diversity, richness, and contribution to total diversity were recorded in largely enclosed patches compared to partially enclosed patches. Partially enclosed patches were dominated by 2 small, frugivorous understory bat species (Carollia sowelli and Carollia perspicillata), whereas largely enclosed patches were dominated by 2 large-bodied, canopy-dwelling, frugivorous bats (Artibeus lituratus and Artibeus jamaicensis), which primarily feed on figs, a tree species that is abundant in rain forest. Bat diversity, richness, and contribution to total diversity were positively correlated with the proportion of area with rain forest, and bat abundance was negatively correlated with canopy openness.