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90 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Geissen Geissen, Violette
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1.
Artículo
Effects of plastic mulch film residues on wheat rhizosphere and soil properties
Qi, Yueling (autora) ; Ossowicki, Adam (autor) ; Yang, Xiaomei (autora) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autora) ; Dini Andreote, Francisco (autor) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (autora) ; Garbeva, Paolina (autora) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Hazardous Materials Vol. 387, 121711 (2020), p. 1-7 ISSN: 0304-3894
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Resumen en inglés

Plastic residues could accumulate in soils as a consequence of using plastic mulching, which results in a serious environmental concern for agroecosystems. As an alternative, biodegradable plastic films stand as promising products to minimize plastic debris accumulation and reduce soil pollution. However, the effects of residues from traditional and biodegradable plastic films on the soil-plant system are not well studied. In this study, we used a controlled pot experiment to investigate the effects of macro- and micro- sized residues of low-density polyethylene and biodegradable plastic mulch films on the rhizosphere bacterial communities, rhizosphere volatile profiles and soil chemical properties. Interestingly, we identified significant effects of biodegradable plastic residues on the rhizosphere bacterial communities and on the blend of volatiles emitted in the rhizosphere. For example, in treatments with biodegradable plastics, bacteria genera like Bacillus and Variovorax were present in higher relative abundances and volatile compounds like dodecanal were exclusively produced in treatment with biodegradable microplastics. Furthermore, significant differences in soil pH, electrical conductivity and C:N ratio were observed across treatments. Our study provides evidence for both biotic and abiotic impacts of plastic residues on the soil-plant system, suggesting the urgent need for more research examining their environmental impacts on agroecosystems.


2.
Artículo
Sewage sludge application as a vehicle for microplastics in eastern Spanish agricultural soils
van den Berg, Pim (autor) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autora) ; Corradini, Fabio (autor) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (autora) ;
Contenido en: Environmental Pollution Vol. 261, article number 114198 (June 2020), p. 1-7 ISSN: 1873-6424
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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Microplastic pollution is becoming a major challenge with the growing use of plastic. In recent years, research about microplastic pollution in the environment has become a field of study with increased interest, with ever expanding findings on sources, sinks and pathways of microplastics. Wastewater treatment plants effectively remove microplastics from wastewater and concentrate them in sewage sludge which is often used to fertilise agricultural fields. Despite this, quantification of microplastic pollution in agricultural fields through the application of sewage sludge is largely unknown. In light of this issue, four wastewater treatment plants and 16 agricultural fields (0–8 sewage sludge applications of 20 e 22 tons ha-¹ per application), located in the east of Spain, were sampled. Microplastics were extracted using a floatation and filtration method, making a distinction between light density microplastics (ρ < 1 g cm−³) and heavy density microplastics (ρ > 1 g cm−³). Sewage sludge, on average, had alight density plastic load of 18,000 ± 15,940 microplastics kg-¹ and a heavy density plastic load of 32,070 ± 19,080 microplastics kg-¹. Soils without addition of sewage sludge had an average light density plastic load of 930 ± 740 microplastics kg-¹ and a heavy density plastic load of 1100 ± 570 microplastics kg-¹. Soils with addition of sewage sludge had an average light density plastic load of 2130 ± 950 microplastics kg-¹ and a heavy density plastic load of 3060 ± 1680 microplastics kg-¹. On average, soils’plastic loads increased by 280 light density microplastics kg-¹ and 430 heavy density microplastics kg-¹ with each successive application of sewage sludge, indicating that sewage sludge application results in accumulation of microplastics in agricultural soils.


3.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Biogenic transport of glyphosate in the presence of LDPE microplastics: a mesocosm experiment
Yang, Xiaomei ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (coaut.) ; Bemani, Akram (coaut.) ; Gertsen, Hennie (coaut.) ; Salánki, Tamás (coaut.) ; Guo, Xuetao (coaut.) ; Fu, Haimei (coaut.) ; Xue, Sha (coaut.) ; Ritsema, Coen (coaut.) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Environmental Pollution Vol. 245 (February 2019), p. 829-835 ISSN: 1873-6424
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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The accumulation of plastic debris and herbicide residues has become a huge challenge and poses many potential risks to environmental health and soil quality. In the present study, we investigated the transport of glyphosate and its main metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) via earthworms in the presence of different concentrations of light density polyethylene microplastics in the litter layer during a 14-day mesocosm experiment. The results showed earthworm gallery weight was negatively affected by the combination of glyphosate and microplastics. Glyphosate and AMPA concentrated in the first centimetre of the top soil layer and the downward transport of glyphosate and AMPA was only detected in the earthworm burrows, ranging from 0.04 to 4.25 μg g−¹ for glyphosate and from 0.01 (less than limit of detection) to 0.76 μg g−¹ for AMPA. The transport rate of glyphosate (including AMPA) from the litter layer into earthworm burrows ranged from 6.6 ± 4.6% to 18.3 ± 2.4%, depending on synergetic effects of microplastics and glyphosate application. The findings imply that earthworm activities strongly influence pollutant movement into the soil, which potentially affects soil ecosystems. Further studies focused on the fate of pollutants in the microenvironment of earthworm burrows are needed.


4.
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Evidence of microplastic accumulation in agricultural soils from sewage sludge disposal
Corradini, Fabio (autor) ; Meza, Pablo (autor) ; Eguiluz, Raúl (autor) ; Casado, Francisco (autor) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autora) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Science of The Total Environment Vol. 671 (June 2019), p. 411-420 ISSN: 0048-9697
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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Microplastics are emerging as a steadily increasing environmental threat. Wastewater treatment plants efficiently remove microplastics from sewage, trapping the particles in the sludge and preventing their entrance into aquatic environments. Treatment plants are essentially taking the microplastics out of the waste water and concentrating themin the sludge, however. It has become common practice to use this sludge on agricultural soils as a fertilizer. The aimof the current researchwas to evaluate the microplastic contamination of soils by this practice, assessing the implications of successive sludge applications by looking at the total count of microplastic particles in soil samples. Thirty-one agricultural fields with different sludge application records and similar edaphoclimatic conditions were evaluated. Field records of sludge application covered a ten year period. For all fields, historical disposal events used the same amount of sludge (40 ton ha−¹ dry weight). Extraction of microplasticswas done by flotation and particles were then counted and classifiedwith the help of a microscope. Seven sludge samples were collected in the fields that underwent sludge applications during the study period. Soils where 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 applications of sludge had been performed had a median of 1.1, 1.6, 1.7, 2.3, and 3.5 particles g−¹ dry soil, respectively. There were statistical differences in the microplastic contents related to the number of applications that a field had undergone (1, 2, 3 b 4, 5). Microplastic content in sludge ranged from 18 to 41 particles g−¹, with a median of 34 particles g−¹.

The majority of the observed microplastics were fibers (90% in sludge, and 97% in soil). Our results indicate that microplastic counts increase over time where successive sludge applications are performed. Microplastics observed in soil samples stress the relevance of sludge as a driver of soil microplastic contamination.


5.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Leaching of microplastics by preferential flow in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) burrows
Yu, Miao (autor) ; van der Ploeg, Martine (autora) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autora) ; Yang, Xiaomei (autora) ; Zhang, Shaoliang (autor) ; Ma, Xiaoyi (autora) ; Ritsema, Coen J. (autor) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Environmental Chemistry Vol. 16, no. 1 (January 2019), p. 31-40 ISSN: 1448-2517
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In the current study, we examine how the activities of earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) affect microplastic (MP) distribution and concentration in soil, with a focus on low density polyethylene (LDPE). We also want to determine if MPs can be flushed out with water. We used a laboratory sandy soil column (polyvinyl chloride tube) experimental set-up and tested five different treatments: (1) treatment with just soil (control) to check if the saturated conductivity (Ksat) could be impacted by MP, (2) treatment with MP, (3) treatment with MP and litter, (4) treatment with earthworms and litter as a second control for treatment 5 and (5) treatment with MPs, earthworms and litter. Each treatment consisted of eight replicates. For the treatments with MP, the concentration of MP added at the start of the experiment was 7 % by weight (3.97 g, polyethylene, 50 % 1 mm–250 µm, 30 % 250 µm–150 µm and 20 % <150 µm) based on 52.78 g of dry litter from Populus nigra. In the treatments using earthworms, two adult earthworms, with an initial average weight of (7.14 ± 0.26) g, were placed in each column. Results showed that LDPE particles could be introduced into the soil by the earthworms.

MP particles were detected in each soil sample and within different soil layers for the earthworm treatments. Earthworms showed a tendency to transport the smaller MP particles and that the amount of MPs in size class <250 μm increased in soil samples with increasing soil depth in comparison to the other size classes. After leaching, MPs were only detected in the leachate from the treatments with the earthworms, and the MP had similar size distributions as the soil samples in the 40–50 cm layer of the treatment with MP, earthworms and litter. The results of this study clearly show that biogenic activities can mobilise MP transport from the surface into the soil and even be leached into drainage. It is highly likely that biogenic activities constitute a potential pathway for MPs to be transported into soil and groundwater.


6.
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Predicting soil microplastic concentration using vis-NIR spectroscopy
Corradini, Fabio ; Bartholomeus, Harm (coaut.) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (coaut.) ; Gertsen, Hennie (coaut.) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Science of the Total Environment Vol. 650, part 1, (February 2019), p. 922-932 ISSN: 0048-9697
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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Microplastic accumulation in soil may have a detrimental impact on soil biota. The lack of standardized methods to identify and quantify microplastics in soils is an obstacle to research. Existing techniques are time-consuming and field data are seldom collected. To tackle the problem, we explored the possibilities of using a portable spectroradiometer working in the near infrared range (350–2500 nm) to rapidly assess microplastic concentrations in soils without extraction. Four sets of artificially polluted soil samples were prepared. Three sets had only one polymer polluting the soil (low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), or polyvinyl chloride (PVC)). The fourth set contained random amounts of the three polymers (Mix). The concentrations of microplastics were regressed on the reflectance observed for each of the 2150 wavelengths registered by the instrument, using a Bayesian approach. For a measurement range between 1 and 100 g kg−¹, results showed a root-mean-squared-deviation (RMSD) of 8, 18, and 10 g kg−¹ for LDPE, PET, and PVC. The Mix treatment presented an RMSD of 8, 10, and 5 g kg−¹ for LDPE, PET, and PVC. The repeatability of the proposed method was 0.2–8.4, 0.1–5.1, and 0.1–9.0 g kg−¹ for LDPE, PET, and PVC, respectively. Overall, our results suggest that vis-NIR techniques are suitable to identify and quantify LDPE, PET, and PVC microplastics in soil samples, with a 10 g kg−¹ accuracy and a detection limit ≈ 15 g kg−¹. The method proposed is different than other approaches since it is faster because it avoids extraction steps and can directly quantify the amount of plastic in a sample. Nevertheless, it seems to be useful only for pollution hotspots.


7.
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An overview of microplastic and nanoplastic pollution in agroecosystems
Ng, Ee Ling (autora) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autora) ; Eldridge, Simon M. (autor) ; Johnston, Priscilla (autora) ; Hu, Hang-Wei (autor) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (autora) ; Chen, Deli (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Science of the Total Environment Vol. 627 (June 2018), p. 1377-1388 ISSN: 0048-9697
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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Microplastics and nanoplastics are emerging pollutants of global importance. They are small enough to be ingested by a wide range of organisms and at nano-scale, they may cross some biological barriers. However, our understanding of their ecological impact on the terrestrial environment is limited. Plastic particle loading in agroecosystems could be high due to inputs of some recycled organic waste and plastic film mulching, so it is vital that we develop a greater understanding of any potentially harmful or adverse impacts of these pollutants to agroecosystems. In this article, we discuss the sources of plastic particles in agroecosystems, the mechanisms, constraints and dynamic behaviour of plastic during aging on land, and explore the responses of soil organisms and plants at different levels of biological organisation to plastic particles of micro and nano-scale. Based on limited evidence at this point and understanding that the lack of evidence of ecological impact from microplastic and nanoplastic in agroecosystems does not equate to the evidence of absence, we propose considerations for addressing the gaps in knowledge so that we can adequately safeguard world food supply.


8.
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Decay of low-density polyethylene by bacteria extracted from earthworm's guts: a potential for soil restoration
Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autor) ; Thapa, Binita (coaut.) ; Yang, Xiaomei (coaut.) ; Gertsen, Hennie (coaut.) ; Salánki, Tamás (coaut.) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (coaut.) ; Garbeva, Paolina (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Science of the Total Environment Vol. 624 (May 2018), p. 753-757 ISSN: 0048-9697
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) is the most abundant source of microplastic pollution worldwide. A recent study found that LDPE decay was increased and the size of the plastic was decreased after passing through the gut of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (Oligochaeta). Here, we investigated the involvement of earthworm gut bacteria in the microplastic decay. The bacteria isolated from the earthworm's gut were Gram-positive, belonging to phylum Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. These bacteria were used in a short-term microcosm experiment performed with gamma-sterilized soil with or without LDPE microplastics (MP). We observed that the LDPE-MP particle size was significantly reduced in the presence of bacteria. In addition, the volatile profiles of the treatments were compared and clear differences were detected. Several volatile compounds such as octadecane, eicosane, docosane and tricosane were measured only in the treatments containing both bacteria and LDPE-MP, indicating that these long-chain alkanes are byproducts of bacterial LDPE-MP decay.


9.
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A framework approach for unravelling the impact of multiple factors influencing flooding
Gai, Lingtong (autora) ; Baartman, Jantiene E. M. (autora) ; Mendoza Carranza, Manuel (autor) ; Wang, Feng (autor) ; Ritsema, Coen J. (autor) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Journal of Flood Risk Management Vol. 11 (2018), p. 111-126 ISSN: 1753-318X
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To have a better understanding of the in fluence of topographic, climatic, and, especially, anthropogenic factors on hydrological discharge and flooding, this study proposes a new framework approach using a set of methods to answer the questions why, where, when, and how flooding occurs. Including conditional inference tree (CIT), cross-correlation, and double-mass curves analysis, the approach is demonstrated in an application to the Wei River Basin, China. From the CIT analysis, dam construction period was identified as the most important factor (why), and the sub-catchment farthest upstream contributed the most to the flooding of the downstream floodplain (where). We then analysed the effect of the periods of dam construction on the time lag change (when) and the precipitation – discharge relationship (how) using cross-correlation analysis and double-mass curves analysis, respectively. The results suggested that the dam construction delayed the precipitation for 0.4 days on average compared to before the dam construction period, and the discharge at the outlet of the basin was reduced by 44%. This framework approach is promising as it can quantitatively evaluate the importance of multiple factors on multiple years of flooding, while many studies evaluate single flooding events.


10.
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Influence of microplastic addition on glyphosate decay and soil microbial activities in Chinese loess soil
Yang, Xiaomei ; Bento, Célia P.M. (coaut.) ; Chen, Hao (coaut.) ; Zhang, Hongming (coaut.) ; Xue, Sha (coaut.) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (coaut.) ; Zomer, Paul (coaut.) ; Ritsema, Coen J. (coaut.) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Environmental Pollution Vol. 242, Part A (November 2018), p. 338-347 ISSN: 0269-7491
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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The intensive use of pesticide and plastic mulches has considerably enhanced crop growth and yield. Pesticide residues and plastic debris, however, have caused serious environmental problems. This study investigated the effects of the commonly used herbicide glyphosate and micrometre-sized plastic debris, referred as microplastics, on glyphosate decay and soil microbial activities in Chinese loess soil by a microcosm experiment over 30 days incubation. Results showed that glyphosate decay was gradual and followed a single first-order decay kinetics model. In different treatments (with/without microplastic addition), glyphosate showed similar half-lives (32.8 days). The soil content of aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), the main metabolite of glyphosate, steadily increased without reaching plateau and declining phases throughout the experiment. Soil microbial respiration significantly changed throughout the entirety of the experiment, particularly in the treatments with higher microplastic addition. The dynamics of soil β-glucosidase, urease and phosphatase varied, especially in the treatments with high microplastic addition. Particles that were considerably smaller than the initially added microplastic particles were observed after 30 days incubation. This result thus implied that microplastic would hardly affect glyphosate decay but smaller plastic particles accumulated in soils which potentially threaten soil quality would be further concerned especially in the regions with intensive plastic mulching application.