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18 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Greenberg, Russell
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1.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
The contribution of epiphytes to the abundance and species richness of canopy insects in a Mexican coffee plantation
Cruz Angón, Andrea ; Baena, Martha L. (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Tropical Ecology Vol. 25, no. 5 (September 2009), p. 453-463 ISSN: 0266-4674
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
47903-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

The abundance of epiphytes has been assumed to be important in explaining the high diversity of tropical canopy arthropods. In this study we assessed the possible role that the presence of epiphytes may have on the diversity and abundance of canopy insects in an experimental study conducted in a coffee plantation in Coatepec, Veracruz, Mexico. Epiphytes were removed from trees in one of two plots in two sites of the coffee plantation. In each plot we collected insects from three Inga jinicuil trees by knockdown insecticide fogging. Insects were sorted to morphospecies, counted and measured. Trees with epiphytes had significantly higher numbers of species and individuals and insects larger than 5 mm were also more species-rich and abundant in trees with epiphytes. The magnitude of the enhancement was surprisingly large with the epiphyte plot samples having on average 90% more individuals and 22% more species than plots without epiphytes. These differences were even greater for large (>5 mm) insects (184% and 113% respectively). Our results support the tenet that epiphytes provide valuable resources to arthropods, which we have illustrated for canopy insects in shade trees of coffee plantations.


2.
Artículo
Simplification of a coffee foliage-dwelling beetle community under low-shade management
Gordon, Caleb E. ; McGill, Brian J. (coaut.) ; Ibarra Núñez, Guillermo (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Basic and Applied Ecology Vol. 10, no. 3 (May 2009), p. 246-254 ISSN: 1439-1791
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés | Alemán |
Resumen en inglés

Coffee agroforests may be structurally and floristically complex and may contain a significant fraction of species from biodiverse and threatened tropical montane forest biotas; hence, understanding the dynamics of tropical forest biodiversity in coffee agroecosystems has emerged as a centrally important area of tropical conservation biology research. We conducted a morphospecies analysis on foliage-dwelling beetles collected from coffee plants on four coffee farms in southern Chiapas, Mexico, to characterize variation in the abundance, species richness, and species composition of this mega-diverse taxon in relation to coffee cultivation system, spatio-temporal variation, and predator removal. We constructed thirty-two cages to exclude birds and bats on four farms, each enclosing 7–10 coffee plants and paired with an adjacent uncaged control plot, and then collected beetles from coffee foliage with D-Vac aspirators in each plot once every 3 months for one year.

We classified the 2662 beetles collected into 293 morphospecies, representing 42 families of beetles. Extrapolation and interpolation analyses revealed a very high level of species richness, with no plateau and only a slight leveling trend observed in our species accumulation curves. We found that low-shade systems contain equal or higher beetle abundance, lower species richness, more highly homogenized species composition, and higher abundance of coffee berry borer pests on coffee foliage than do high-shade systems. We observed no effect of flying vertebrate exclusion on the coffee foliage beetle assemblage, but did find significant variation in abundance, species richness, and species composition of coffee foliage beetles across seasons and study sites. The increased beetle biodiversity of high-shade coffee cultivation systems has important implications both for the preservation of native biodiversity in coffee growing regions and for the control of agricultural pests such as the coffee berry borer.

Resumen en alemán

Kaffee-Agrarwälder können strukturell und floristisch komplex sein und können einen signifikanten Anteil von Arten aus biodiversen und gefährdeten tropischen montanen Waldbiotopen enthalten. Deshalb hat sich das Verständnis der Dynamik der tropischen Waldbiodiversität in Kaffee-Agrarökosystemen als ein zentrales Gebiet der Forschung in der tropischen Naturschutzbiologie entwickelt. Wir führten eine Morphospezies-Untersuchung an laubbewohnenden Käfern durch, die auf Kaffeepflanzen in vier Kaffeefarmen im südlichen Chiapas, Mexiko, gesammelt wurden, um die Variation in der Abundanz, im Artenreichtum und in der Artenzusammensetzung dieses megadiversen Taxons in Bezug zu setzen zum Kaffee-Anbausystem, zur raumzeitlichen Variation und zur Entfernung der Prädatoren. Wir konstruierten 32 Käfige um Vögel und Fledermäuse auf vier Farmen auszuschließen, von denen jeder 7-10 Kaffeepflanzen enthielt, und bildeten Paare mit naheliegenden, nicht eingeschlossenen Kontrollflächen. Wir sammelten dann in jeder Fläche über ein Jahr lang einmal in drei Monaten die Käfer mit einem D-Vac-Saugapparat von den Kaffeeblättern. Wir klassifizierten die 2662 gesammelten Käfer in 293 Morphospecies, die 42 Käferfamilien repräsentierten.

Extrapolations- und Intrapolationsanalysen ließen einen sehr hohen Grad des Artenreichtums erkennen, und die Artenakkumulationskurven verliefen ohne Plateau und nur mit einer leicht abfallenden Steigung. Wir fanden, dass Systeme mit wenig Schatten eine ähnliche oder höhere Käferabundanz, einen geringeren Artenreichtum, eine viel stärker homogene Artenzusammensetzung und eine höhere Abundanz von Schädlingen, die sich in Kaffeebohnen vermehren, aufweisen als Systeme mit viel Schatten. Wir fanden keine Auswirkung des Ausschlusses von fliegenden Vertebraten auf die Käferzusammensetzung auf den Kaffeeblättern. Wir fanden jedoch eine signifikante Veränderung in der Abundanz, im Artenreichtum und in der Artenzusammensetzung der Käfer auf den Kaffeeblättern mit der Jahreszeit und in den Untersuchungsgebieten. Die erhöhte Käferdiversität der schattigen Kaffeepflanzungen hat wichtige Implikationen sowohl für die Erhaltung der vorhandenen Biodiversität in Kaffeeanbauregionen, als auch für die Kontrolle von landwirtschaftlichen Schädlingen, wie dem Kaffeebohnenbohrer.


3.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Biodiversity coservation, yield, and alternative products in coffee agroecosystems in Sumatra, Indonesia
Philpott, Stacy M. ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Rice, Robert A. (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biodiversity and Conservation Vol. 17, no. 8 (July 2008), p. 1805-1820 ISSN: 0960-3115
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
46760-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Agroecology and conservation must overlap to protect biodiversity and farmer livelihoods. Coffee agroecosystems with complex shade canopies protect biodiversity. Yet, few have examined biodiversity in coffee agroecosystems in Asia relative to the Americas and many question whether coffee agroecosystems can play a similar role for conservation. We examined vegetation, ant and bird diversity, coffee yields and revenues, and harvest of alternative products in coffee farms and forests in SW Sumatra, Indonesia near Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park (BBS). BBS is among the last habitats for large mammals in Sumatra and >15,000 families illegally cultivate coffee inside of BBS. As a basis for informing management recommendations, we compared the conservation potential and economic outputs from farms inside and outside of BBS. Forests had higher canopy cover, canopy depth, tree height, epiphyte loads, and more emergent trees than coffee farms. Coffee farms inside BBS had more epiphytes and trees and fewer coffee plants than farms outside BBS. Tree, ant, and bird richness was significantly greater in forests than in coffee farms, and richness did not differ in coffee farms inside and outside of BBS. Species similarity of forest and coffee trees, ants, and birds was generally low (<50%). Surprisingly, farms inside the park were significantly older, but farm size, coffee yields, and revenues from coffee did not depend on farm location. Farmers outside BBS received higher prices for their coffee and also more often produced other crops in their coffee fields such that incentives could be created to draw illegal farmers out of the park. We also discuss these results with reference to similar work in Chiapas, Mexico to compare the relative contribution of coffee fields to conservation in the two continents, and discuss implications for working with farmers in Sumatra towards conservation plans incorporating sustainable coffee production.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Biodiversity loss in Latin American coffee landscapes: review of the evidence on ants, birds, and trees
Philpott, Stacy M. ; Arendt, Wayne J. (coaut.) ; Armbrecht, Inge (coaut.) ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Diestch, Thomas V. (coaut.) ; Gordon, Caleb (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Reynoso Santos, Roberto (coaut.) ; Soto Pinto, Lorena (coaut.) (1958-) ; Tejeda Cruz, César (coaut.) ; Williams Linera, Guadalupe (coaut.) ; Valenzuela González, Jorge Ernesto (coaut.) ; Zolotoff, José Manuel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 22, no. 5 (October 2008), p. 1093-1105 ISSN: 0888-8892
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
46889-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en español

Diversos estudios han documentado las pérdidas de biodiversidad debido a la intensificación del manejo de café (disminución de la riqueza y complejidad del dosel). Sin embargo, persisten preguntas sobre la sensibilidad relativa de diferentes taxa, especialistas de hábitat y grupos funcionales, y sí las implicaciones para la conservación de la biodiversidad varían entre regiones. Revisamos cuantitativamente los datos de estudios de biodiversidad de hormigas, aves y árboles en agroecosistemas de café para abordar las siguientes preguntas: ¿La riqueza de especies declina con la intensificación o con las características individuales de la vegetación?¿Hay pérdidas significativas de riqueza de especies en los sistemas cafetaleros en comparación con los bosques?¿Es mayor la pérdida en especies de bosque o en grupos funcionales particulares? y ¿Las aves o las hormigas son más afectadas por la intensificación? En los estudios revisados, la riqueza de hormigas y aves declinó con la intensificación del manejo y con los cambios de vegetación. La riqueza de especies de todas las hormigas y aves y la de especies de hormigas y aves de bosque fue menor en la mayoría de los agroecosistemas cafetaleros que en los bosques, pero el café rústico (cultivado bajo dosel de bosque nativo) sustentó la mayor pérdida de especies, y la pérdida de especies de hormigas, aves y árboles de bosque aumentó con la intensificación del manejo.

Las pérdidas de especies de hormigas y aves fueron similares, aunque las pérdidas de hormigas de bosque fueron más drásticas en el café rústico. La riqueza de especies de aves migratorias y de aves que forrajean en varios estratos de vegetación fueron menos afectadas por la intensificación que las especies residentes de dosel y de sotobosque. Las fincas rústicas protegieron más especies que otros sistemas cafetaleros, y la pérdida de especies dependió mayormente de la especialización de hábitat y de los atributos funcionales. Recomendamos que el bosque sea protegido, se promueva el café rústico y se restauren las fincas intensivas mediante el incremento de la densidad y riqueza de árboles nativos y permitiendo el crecimiento de epífitas. También recomendamos que las futuras investigaciones enfoquen las compensaciones potenciales entre la conservación de la biodiversidad y la forma de vida de los campesinos que producen café.

Resumen en inglés

Studies have documented biodiversity losses due to intensification of coffee management (reduction in canopy richness and complexity). Nevertheless, questions remain regarding relative sensitivity of different taxa, habitat specialists, and functional groups, and whether implications for biodiversity conservation vary across regions.We quantitatively reviewed data from ant, bird, and tree biodiversity studies in coffee agroecosystems to address the following questions: Does species richness decline with intensification or with individual vegetation characteristics? Are there significant losses of species richness in coffee-management systems compared with forests? Is species loss greater for forest species or for particular functional groups?and Are ants or birds more strongly affected by intensification? Across studies, ant and bird richness declined with management intensification and with changes in vegetation. Species richness of all ants and birds and of forest ant and bird species was lower in most coffee agroecosystems than in forests, but rustic coffee (grown under native forest canopies) had equal or greater ant and bird richness than nearby forests.

Sun coffee(grown without canopy trees) sustained the highest species losses, and species loss of forest ant, bird, and tree species increased with management intensity. Losses of ant and bird species were similar, although losses of forest ants were more drastic in rustic coffee. Richness of migratory birds and of birds that forage across vegetation strata was less affected by intensification than richness of resident, canopy, and understory bird species. Rustic farms protected more species than other coffee systems, and loss of species depended greatly on habitat specialization and functional traits. We recommend that forest be protected, rustic coffee be promoted,and intensive coffee farms be restored by augmenting native tree density and richness and allowing growth of epiphytes. We also recommend that future research focus on potential trade-offs between biodiversity conservation and farmer livelihoods stemming from coffee production.


5.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Field-testing ecological and economic benefits of coffee certification programs
Philpott, Stacy M. ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Rice, Robert (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 21, no. 4 (August 2007), p. 975-985 ISSN: 0888-8892
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
44157-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Los agroecosistemas de café son críticos para el éxito de esfuerzos de conservación en América Latina debido a su importancia ecológica y económica. Los programas de certificación de café pueden ofrecer una manera de proteger la biodiversidad y mantener el sustento de los campesinos. Los programas de certificación de café caen en tres categorías distintas, pero no mutuamente excluyentes: orgánico, comercio justo y de sombra. Los resultados de estudios previos demuestran que la certificación de sombra puede beneficiar a la biodiversidad, pero no es claro si la participación de un campesino en cualquier programa de certificación puede proporcionar beneficios tanto ecológicos como económicos. Para estimar el valor de la certificación de café para los esfuerzos de conservación en la región, examinamos aspectos económicos y ecológicos de la producción de café en ocho cooperativas en Chiapas, México, que tenían certificado orgánico, certificado orgánico y comercio justo o no certificado. Comparamos la vegetación y la diversidad de aves y hormigas en las fincas cafetaleras y bosques, y entrevistamos a campesinos para determinar la producción de café, la ganancia bruta por la producción de café y la superficie con producción de café.

Aunque no hay fincas con certificación de sombra en la región de estudio, utilizamos datos de la vegetación para determinar si las cooperativas pudieran calificar para certificación de sombra. Con base en la certificación, no encontramos diferencias en las características de la vegetación, riqueza de especies de aves y hormigas o la fracción de fauna de bosque en las fincas. Los campesinos con certificación orgánica y orgánica y comercio justo tuvieron más tierra bajo cultivo y, en algunos casos, mayores ganancias que los campesinos no certificados. La superficie de producción de café no varió entre tipos de finca. Ninguna cooperativa alcanzó los estándares de certificación de sombra porque sus plantaciones carecían de estratificación vertical, aunque las variables de la vegetación para la certificación de sombra se correlacionaron significativamente con la diversidad de aves y hormigas. Aunque los campesinos del altiplano de Chiapas con certificación orgánica y/o de comercio justo pueden obtener algunos beneficios económicos de su estatus de certificación, sus fincas no protegen tanta biodiversidad como las fincas con certificación de sombra. Trabajar hacia la triple certificación (orgánica, comercio justo y sombra) a nivel de fincas puede reforzar la protección de biodiversidad, incrementar beneficios a los campesinos y llevar hacia estrategias de conservación más exitosas en regiones productoras de café.

Resumen en inglés

Coffee agroecosystems are critical to the success of conservation efforts in Latin America because of their ecological and economic importance. Coffee certification programs may offer one way to protect biodiversity and maintain farmer livelihoods. Established coffee certification programs fall into three distinct, but not mutually exclusive categories: organic, fair trade, and shade. The results of previous studies demonstrate that shade certification can benefit biodiversity, but it remains unclear whether a farmer's participation in any certification program can provide both ecological and economic benefits. To assess the value of coffee certification for conservation efforts in the region, we examined economic and ecological aspects of coffee production for eight coffee cooperatives in Chiapas, Mexico, that were certified organic, certified organic and fair trade, or uncertified. We compared vegetation and ant and bird diversity in coffee farms and forests, and interviewed farmers to determine coffee yield, gross revenue from coffee production, and area in coffee production. Although there are no shade-certified farms in the study region, we used vegetation data to determine whether cooperatives would qualify for shade certification.

We found no differences in vegetation characteristics, ant or bird species richness, or fraction of forest fauna in farms based on certification. Farmers with organic and organic and fair-trade certification had more land under cultivation and in some cases higher revenue than uncertified farmers. Coffee production area did not vary among farm types. No cooperative passed shade-coffee certification standards because the plantations lacked vertical stratification, yet vegetation variables for shade certification significantly correlated with ant and bird diversity. Although farmers in the Chiapas highlands with organic and/or fair-trade certification may reap some economic benefits from their certification status, their farms may not protect as much biodiversity as shade-certified farms. Working toward triple certification (organic, fair trade, and shade) at the farm level may enhance biodiversity protection, increase benefits to farmers, and lead to more successful conservation strategies in coffee-growing regions.


6.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Seasonal shift in the foraging niche of a tropical avian resident: resource competition at work?
Jedlicka, Julie A. ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Tropical Ecology Vol. 22, no. 4 (July 2006 ), p. 419-429 ISSN: 0266-4674
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B9155 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Este estudio examinó el comportamiento de forrajeo de un ave residente, Basileuterus rufifrons (RCWA), en una finca de café con sombra en Chiapas, México. A diferencia de muchas aves residentes que usan los agroecosistemas de café con sombra solamante durante una estación, RCWAs no se van a otros hábitats cuando los aves migrantes están presente. El forrajeo de RCWA fue comparado cuando las aves migrantes eran presente (la época seca) y ausente (la época de lluvia). La hipótesis fue que los RCWA exhibirían un cambio de forrajeo con los cambios de estaciones a causa de la competencia de recursos con los migrantes. Observaciones en el docel y el sotobosque en un cafetal muestran que durante la época de lluvia, los RCWAs forrajean igualmente en los dos niveles de vegetación, pero tienen más éxito forrajeando en el docel. Durante la época seca, los migrantes forrajean principalmente en el docel y los RCWAs se mueven al sotobosque donde efectúan 80% de las maniobras de forrajeo. Durante ese tiempo, los RCWAs tuvieron menos éxito forrajeando tanto en el docel como en el sotobosque. Durante la época seca el número de artrópodos bajó entre 47–79% en el docel y entre 4–5% en el sotobosque a causa de la depredación de las aves. En el docel, la disponibilidad de artrópodos grandes (>5 mm en longitud) bajó en un 58% de la época de lluvia a la época seca. Tales reducciones de recursos podrían causar el cambio de lugar a forrajeo observado en RCWA, pero otras explicaciones e hipótesis son discutidas. Pueden ser que este cambio de forrajeo sea común en algunas aves residentes pequeñas que comen artrópodos para evitar la competencia con los migrantes durante la época seca

Resumen en inglés

This study examined the foraging behaviour of a resident bird species, the rufous-capped warbler (RCWA, Basileuterus rufifrons), in a shaded-coffee farm in Chiapas, Mexico. Unlike many resident species that use shaded-coffee agroecosystems seasonally, RCWAs do not move to other habitats when migrants are present. RCWA foraging was compared when migrant birds were present (dry season) and absent (wet season). It was hypothesized that RCWAs would exhibit a seasonal foraging niche shift because of resource competition with migrants. Observations from both the canopy and coffee understorey show that RCWAs foraged almost equally in both vegetative layers during the wet season although they were more successful foraging in the canopy. In the dry season, migrants foraged primarily in the canopy and RCWAs shifted so that 80% of RCWA foraging manoeuvres were in the understorey. At that time RCWAs foraged less successfully in both vegetative layers. Avian predation in the dry season was found to reduce densities of arthropods by 47-79% in the canopy, as opposed to 4-5% in the understorey. In the canopy, availability of large (>5 mm in length) arthropods decreased by 58% from the wet to dry season. Such resource reductions could have caused the RCWA foraging niche shift yet other alternative or additional hypotheses are discussed. Shifts in foraging niche may be a widespread mechanism for some small insectivorous residents to avoid seasonal competition with abundant migrant species.


7.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Terrestrial vertebrates of tidal marshes: evolution, ecology, and conservation
Greenberg, Russell (ed.) ; Maldonado, Jesús E. (coed.) ; Droege, Sam (coed.) ;
Contenido en: Studies in Avian Biology No. 32 (2006), p. 1-339 ISBN:0943610702, 978-0943610702
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
33789-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal

8.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Nonbreeding habitat selection and foraging behavior of the black-throated green warbler complex in southeastern Mexico
Greenberg, Russell ; González, Claudia Elia (coaut.) ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Reitsma, Robert (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: The Condor : An International Journal of Avian Biology Vol. 103, no. 1 (February 2001), p. 31-37 ISSN: 0010-5422
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B8996 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
PDF PDF PDF

9.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
The impact of avian insectivory on arthropods and leaf damage in some Guatemalan coffee plantations
Greenberg, Russell ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Cruz Angón, Andrea (coaut.) ; MacVean, Charles (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ecology a Publication of the Ecological Society of America Vol. 81 , no. 6 (June 2000), p. 1750-1755 ISSN: 0012-9658
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B10326 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
PDF
Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

Experimental work has established that vertebrates can have a large impact on the abundance of arthropods in temperate forest and grasslands, as well as on tropical islands. The importance of vertebrate insectivory has only rarely been evaluated for mainland tropical ecosystems. In this study, we used exclosures to measure the impact of birds on arthropods in Guatemalan coffee plantations. Variation in shade management on coffee farms provides a gradient of similar habitats that vary in the complexity of vegetative structure and floristics. We hypothesized that shaded coffee plantations, which support a higher abundance of insectivorous birds, would experience relatively greater levels of predation than would the sun coffee farms. We found a reduction (64–80%) in the number of large (. 5 mm in length) but not small arthropods in both coffee types which was consistent across most taxonomic groups and ecological guilds. We also found a small but significant increase in the frequency of herbivore damage on leaves in the exclosures. This level of predation suggests that birds may help in reducing herbivore numbers and is also consistent with food limitation for birds in coffee agroecosystems. However, the presence of shade did not have an effect on levels of insectivory.


10.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Bird populations in rustic and planted shade coffe plantations of eastern Chiapas, México
Greenberg, Russell ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Sterling, John (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biotropica Vol. 29, no. 4 (December 1997), p. 501-514 ISSN: 0006-3606
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
40304-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Much of the remaining “forest” vegetation in eastern Chiapas, Mexico is managed for coffee production. In this region coffee is grown under either the canopy of natural forest or under a planted canopy dominated by Inga spp. Despite the large differences in diversity of dominant plant species, both planted and rustic shade coffee plantations support a high overall diversity of bird species; we recorded approximately 105 species in each plantation type on fixed radius point counts. We accumulated a combined species list of 180 species on repeatedly surveyed transects through both coffee plantation types. These values are exceeded regionally only by moist tropical forest. Of the habitats surveyed, shade coffee was second only to acacia groves in the abundance and diversity of Nearctic migrants. The two plantation types have similar bird species lists and both are similar in composition to the dominant woodland—mixed pine-oak. Both types of shade coffee plantation habitats differ from other local habitats in supporting highly seasonal bird populations. Survey numbers almost double during the dry season—an increase that is found in omnivorous migrants and omnivorous, frugivorous, and nectarivorous resident species. Particularly large influxes were found for Tennessee warblers (Vermivora peregrina) and northern orioles (Icterus galbula) in Inga dominated plantations.