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119 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Hénaut, Yann
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1.
Artículo
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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An emerging disturbance for Caribbean reefs is the massive arrival of pelagic Sargassum, which deteriorates water quality due to the production of leachates. The highest arrivals of Sargassum took place when broadcasting corals spawned. We experimentally determined the effect of Sargassum leachates on swimming behavior of Acropora palmata larvae through five treatments (control, stain (simulating 100% leachate color), and 25%, 50% and 100% Sargassum leachate concentrations) during 30 min (10 min of videos and 20 min of post-observations). In the videos, larvae with leachates reduced swimming speed, were positively geotactic, the percentage of individuals that swam in a spiral pattern increased, and most behavioral displacements occurred at lower frequencies than larvae without leachates. Moreover, symptomatic spiral behavior was higher in the presence of leachates, suggesting that this behavior may be an effect of pollution. During post-observations, most larvae with leachates were motionless. This is the first time that Sargassum leachates have been documented modifying larval swimming behavior, which may reduce larval dispersion and genetic diversity. We suggest that a future evaluation of the effects of leachates at lower concentrations and over longer periods of exposure is needed. The resilience of corals may be compromised if Sargassum arrivals become frequent events.


2.
Artículo
Learning capacities and welfare in an Antillean manatee, Trichechus manatus manatus
Hénaut, Yann (autor) ; Lara Sánchez, Lizbeth Esmeralda (autora) ; Morales Vela, José Benjamín (autor) ; Machkour M'Rabet, Salima (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Comptes Rendus Biologies Volume 343, número 1 (2020), p. 73-87 ISSN: 1768-3238
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Studies on the cognitive abilities of manatees are limited despite their importance for the environmental enrichment and welfare of individuals in captivity and the understanding of manatee behaviour in the wild. Our study analyses how the presence of new stimuli and their association with food may have changed the behaviour of an Antillean manatee called Daniel. First, Daniel was observed in the absence of stimuli and subsequently, in step two, presented with the presence of four different geometrical shapes. During step three, we trained Daniel to eat from the square, while in step four he was presented with the four shapes without food. The behaviour and interaction of the manatee with the square increased considerably. We observed that three and twelve months after training the manatee still chose the square and displayed behaviours toward this specific shape. This study allowed us to formally demonstrate the ability of manatees to associate visual cues with food and increase activity with environmental and occupational devices. Our results open up new perspectives for behavioural studies on manatees, in particular those associated with cognition, management and welfare in captivity.


3.
Artículo
Nest site selection during colony relocation in Yucatan Peninsula populations of the ponerine ants Neoponera villosa (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
Rocha, Franklin H. (autor) ; Lachaud, Jean Paul (autor) ; Hénaut, Yann (autor) ; Pozo, Carmen (autora) ; Pérez Lachaud, Gabriela (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Insects Volumen 11, número 3, 200 (March 2020), páginas 1-15 ISSN: 2075-4450
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In the Yucatan Peninsula, the ponerine ant Neoponera villosa nests almost exclusively in tank bromeliads, Aechmea bracteata. In this study, we aimed to determine the factors influencing nest site selection during nest relocation which is regularly promoted by hurricanes in this area. Using ants with and without previous experience of Ae. bracteata, we tested their preference for refuges consisting of Ae. bracteata leaves over two other bromeliads, Ae. bromeliifolia and Ananas comosus. We further evaluated bromeliad-associated traits that could influence nest site selection (form and size). Workers with and without previous contact with Ae. bracteata significantly preferred this species over others, suggesting the existence of an innate attraction to this bromeliad. However, preference was not influenced by previous contact with Ae. bracteata. Workers easily discriminated between shelters of Ae. bracteata and A. comosus, but not those of the closely related Ae. bromeliifolia. In marked contrast, ants discriminated between similar sized Ae. bracteata and Ae. bromeliifolia plants, suggesting that chemical cues and plant structure play an important role. Size was also significant as they selected the largest plant when provided two dissimilar Ae. bracteata plants. Nest site selection by N. villosa workers seems to depend on innate preferences but familiarization with plant stimuli is not excluded.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Ant and spider species as surrogates for functional community composition of epiphyte-associated invertebrates in a tropical moist forest
Céréghino, Régis ; Corbara, Bruno (coaut.) ; Hénaut, Yann (coaut.) ; Bonhomme, Camille (coaut.) ; Compin, Arthur (coaut.) ; Dejean, Alain (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ecological Indicators Vol. 96, Part 1 (January 2019), p. 694-700 ISSN: 1470-160X
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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Epiphytes represent up to 50% of all plant species in rainforests, where they host a substantial amount of invertebrate biomass. Efficient surrogates for epiphyte invertebrate communities could reduce the cost of biomonitoring surveys while preventing destructive sampling of the plants. Here, we focus on the invertebrate communities associated to tank bromeliads. We ask whether the presence of particular ant and/or spider taxa (easily surveyed taxa) that use these plants as nesting and/or foraging habitats predicts functional trait combinations of aquatic invertebrate communities hosted by the plants. Functional community composition of invertebrates was predicted both by bromeliad habitat features and the presence of certain ant and spider species. The ant Azteca serica preferred wider bromeliad rosettes that trap large amount of detritus, indicating interstitiallike food webs dominated by deposit feeders that burrow in fine particulate organic matter. Leucauge sp. spiders preferred narrower bromeliad rosettes bearing smaller detrital loads, thereby indicating a dominance of pelagic filter-feeding and predatory invertebrates in the water-filled leaf axils. Both Neoponera villosa ants and Eriophora sp. spiders preferred rosettes at intermediate size bearing moderate amounts of detritus, indicating a benthic food web dominated by leaf shredders and gathering collectors. Owing to the animal diversity and biomass supported by rainforest epiphytes, our approach would deserve to be further tested on a range of epiphytes involved in tight interactions with invertebrates. In this context, surrogate species could serve both as indicators of functional diversity, and as early-warning indicators of network disassembly.


5.
Tesis - Maestría
*En proceso técnico. Solicítelo con el bibliotecario(a) de SIBE-Chetumal
Efecto de los lixiviados de Sargassum spp. pelágico en el comportamiento natatorio de las larvas del coral Acropora palmata / Francisco Antonio Martínez
Antonio Martínez, Francisco ; Hénaut, Yann (director) ; Cetz Navarro, Neidy Pauline (asesora) ; Vega Zepeda, Alejandro (asesor) ;
Chetumal, Quintana Roo, México : El Colegio de la Frontera Sur , 2019
Clasificación: TE/579.888 / A5
Nota: En proceso técnico. Solicítelo con el bibliotecario(a) de SIBE-Chetumal
Resumen en español

Una perturbación emergente para los arrecifes del Caribe es el arribo masivo de sargazo pelágico, el cual deteriora la calidad del agua debido a la producción de lixiviados. Los picos de la afluencia de sargazo en el Caribe mexicano pueden coincidir con el periodo de desove de corales liberadores de gametos. En este estudio, las larvas del coral Acropora palmata (Lamarck, 1816) fueron expuestas a cinco tratamientos (testigo, colorante café y tres concentraciones de lixiviados de sargazo al 25 %, 50 % y 100 %) durante 30 minutos (10 minutos de filmación + 20 minutos de observaciones) para determinar si los lixiviados modifican el comportamiento natatorio de las larvas. En las filmaciones se observó que las larvas con lixiviados redujeron la velocidad de nado, aumentaron el porcentaje de individuos nadando en espiral, fueron geotácticamente positivas y la mayoría de los pares de comportamiento cinético mostraron baja frecuencia comparado con las larvas sin lixiviados. Las respuestas de las larvas ocurrieron independientemente de las concentraciones de lixiviados. El comportamiento sintomático de nado en espiral fue mayor en presencia de lixiviados, sugiriendo que este comportamiento podría ser un efecto de la contaminación. Durante las observaciones posteriores a las filmaciones, la mayoría de las larvas con lixiviados permanecieron inmóviles comparado con las larvas sin lixiviados. Por primera vez, se reporta a los lixiviados de sargazo como un disturbio que modifica el comportamiento natatorio de las larvas, los cuales podrían reducir la dispersión de las larvas y el incremento de colonias provenientes de la reproducción sexual de A. palmata. Se sugiere evaluar los efectos de los lixiviados en larvas expuestas a menores concentraciones y con mayor tiempo de exposición. La resiliencia de los corales puede ser rebasada si el arribo masivo de sargazo se convierte en un evento frecuente.

Índice

RESUMEN
INTRODUCCIÓN
ARTÍCULO: Leachate effects of pelagic Sargassum spp. on larval swimming behavior of the coral Acropora palmata
Abstract
Introduction
Results
Discussion
Materials and Methods
References
Acknowledgements
Supplementary Information
CONCLUSIONES
LITERATURA CITADA


6.
Artículo
Efecto de los llamados preeclosionales de Crocodylus moreletii en la duración y el número de eclosiones
Mandujano Camacho, Hernán Orbelín (autor) ; Hénaut, Yann (autor) ; Crocoft, Reginald B. (autor) ; Vliet, Kent (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Acta Universitaria Volumen 29, e2211 (enero 2019), p. 1-13 ISSN: 2007-9621
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Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Diferentes nidadas ex situ de Crocodylus moreletii se sometieron a sesiones de playbacks . Estos variaron con base en la vocalización que emiten, ya sea al inicio o al final del proceso de eclosión, así como en la tasa de repetición (rápida o lenta). Se incluyeron playbacks con diferent e tasa de repetición vocal de un llamado de auxilio de Caiman crocodilus. Otras nidadas se incubaron en silencio. Las eclosiones duraron menos tiempo y se presentaron más eclosiones en grupo con los playbacks de vocalización final de C. moreletii y de C. c rocodilus, ambas con tasa de repetición rápida. Las nidadas sometidas a playbacks de vocalización inicial con tasa de repetición lenta y las nidadas en silencio tardaron más en eclosionar y ocurrieron menos eclosiones en grupo. El tipo de vocalización y la tasa de repetición vocal influyen en la duración de las eclosiones y el número de individuos que eclosionan juntos.

Resumen en inglés

Different ex situ nestings of Crocodylus moreletii underwent playbacks. These varied based on the vocalization they emit, either at the beginning or at the end of the hatching process, as well as at the repetition rate (fast or slow). Playbacks with a different rate of vocal repetition of a call for help of Caiman crocodilus were included. Other nestings were incubated in silence. The hatchings lasted less time and there were more group hatchings with the final vocalization playbacks of C. moreletii and C. crocodilus, both with rapid repetition rate. The nests subjected to playbacks of initial vocalization with slow repetition rate and the nests in silence took longer to hatch, and fewer group hatches occurred. The type of vocalization and the rate of vocal repetition influence on the duration of hatching and the number of individuals that hatch together.


7.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Fine-tuned intruder discrimination favors ant parasitoidism
Pérez Lachaud, Gabriela (autora) ; Rocha, Franklin H. (autor) ; Valle Mora, Javier Francisco (autor) ; Hénaut, Yann (autor) ; Lachaud, Jean Paul (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: PLoS One Vol. 14, no. 1, art. no. e0210739 (January 2019), p. 1-21 ISSN: 0187-6376
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

diversity of arthropods (myrmecophiles) thrives within ant nests, many of them unmolested though some, such as the specialized Eucharitidae parasitoids, may cause direct damage to their hosts. Ants are known to discriminate between nestmates and non-nestmates, but whether they recognize the strength of a threat and their capacity to adjust their behavior accordingly have not been fully explored. We aimed to determine whether Ectatomma tuberculatum ants exhibited specific behavioral responses to potential or actual intruders posing different threats to the host colony and to contribute to an understanding of complex ant-eucharitid interactions. Behavioral responses differed significantly according to intruder type. Ants evicted intruders that represented a threat to the colony’s health (dead ants) or were not suitable as prey items (filter paper, eucharitid parasitoid wasps, non myrmecophilous adult weevils), but killed potential prey (weevil larvae, termites). The timing of detection was in accordance with the nature and size of the intruder: corpses (a potential source of contamination) were detected faster than any other intruder and transported to the refuse piles within 15 min. The structure and complexity of behavioral sequences differed among those intruders that were discarded. Workers not only recognized and discriminated between several distinct intruders but also adjusted their behavior to the type of intruder encountered.

Our results confirm the previously documented recognition capabilities of E. tuberculatum workers and reveal a very fine-tuned intruder discrimination response. Colony- level prophylactic and hygienic behavioral responses through effective removal of inedible intruders appears to be the most general and flexible form of defense in ants against a diverse array of intruders. However, this generalized response to both potentially lethal and harmless intruders might have driven the evolution of ant-eucharitid interactions, opening a window for parasitoid attack and allowing adult parasitoid wasps to quickly leave the natal nest unharmed.


8.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Genetic structure, origin, and connectivity between nesting and foraging areas of hawksbill turtles of the Yucatan Peninsula: a study for conservation and management
Labastida Estrada, Elizabeth (autora) ; Machkour M'Rabet, Salima (autora) ; Díaz Jaimes, Píndaro (autor) ; Cedeño-Vázquez, J.R. (autor) ; Hénaut, Yann (autor) ;
Contenido en: Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems Vol. 29, no. 2 (February 2019), p. 211–222 ISSN: 1099-0755
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

1. Anthropogenic activities have resulted in declines in many marine turtle populations. Their complex life cycle (e.g. female philopatry, hatchling migration, adult movements between breeding and foraging areas) makes it difficult to fully understand some of the biological implications of human impacts on their populations, but genetic tools can play a major role in understanding population dynamics and thus improve conservation and management strategies. 2. Using the mitochondrial DNA control region, this study examines the composition, population structure, and connectivity between rookeries and foraging aggregations, in addition to their relationship with Atlantic rookeries and foraging areas of the hawksbill turtle in the Yucatan Peninsula. 3. Haplotype composition of rookeries showed EiA22, EiA39, and EiA41 as endemic haplotypes and revealed a segregation between the Gulf of Mexico and the Yucatan and Quintana Roo rookeries, defining two management units. Foraging aggregations present 15 haplotypes, some common for Atlantic and others for Mexican rookeries. Considering the Gulf of Mexico versus the Mexican Caribbean, significant population genetic structure was revealed, inferring a differential recruitment of hawksbill turtles. 4. Rookery‐centric mixed‐stock analysis reveals a high contribution of Mexican turtles to local foraging aggregations, principally in the Gulf of Mexico. Foraging‐groundcentric mixed‐stock analysis showed that the Gulf of Mexico foraging aggregation is predominantly composed of individuals from local rookeries, whereas Mexican Caribbean foraging groups have a mixed composition with individuals from Barbados, Brazil, and Puerto Rico rookeries. The connectivity between rookeries and foraging aggregations suggests that the ocean currents and swimming behaviour influence the distribution of hawksbill turtles.

5. Our results highlighted the importance in identifying management units in nesting and foraging areas to develop monitoring and management programmes at appropriate geographic scales. In addition, understanding turtle habitat connectivity will allow for prioritized conservation actions considering particular threats, emphasizing the need for both national and international collaboration for conservation of this endangered species.


9.
Artículo
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Species conservation profiles of tarantula spiders (Araneae, Theraphosidae) listed on CITES
Fukushima, Caroline (autora) ; Mendoza, Jorge Ivan (autor) ; West, Rick C. (autor) ; Longhorn, Stuart John (autor) ; Rivera, Emmanuel (autor) ; Cooper, Ernest W. T. (autor) ; Hénaut, Yann (autor) ; Henriques, Sergio (autor) ; Cardoso, Pedro (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Biodiversity Data Journal Número 7, e39342 (2019), p. 1-183 ISSN: 1314-2828
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

CITES is an international agreement between governments to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival. Regarding spiders, all species listed in CITES are tarantulas. They are included in Appendix II, meaning that they are species that are not necessarily now threatened with extinction but that they may become so unless trade is closely controlled. Many tarantulas are legally and illegally traded in the pet market and they are one of the most traded invertebrate groups. Originally, the CITES list published in 1995 included all the current species of the genus Brachypelma Simon, 1891 plus Aphonopelma pallidum (F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1897) and the so-called Aphonopelma albiceps (Pocock, 1903). After that, some taxonomic changes were done, as well as descriptions of new species in the genus Brachypelma. The objective of this paper is to assess the 21 taxonomically valid spider species listed on CITES according to the IUCN criteria, study the general patterns and trends and advise on possible future conservation actions critical for the survival of endangered species.


10.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Lionfish are successful invasive predators in the Caribbean region and inhabit a large range of habitats. Our study in the Caribbean has focused on the relationships between the biological characteristics of lionfish particularly their size, their activities and use of those different habitats. In this study, we observed a high number of lionfish individuals, focusing on the behavioural activities and biological traits in relation to different habitats and environmental characteristics. We monitored 793 individuals, recording their activities, biological traits, and habitat characteristics. Our results report that lionfish are not solitary, but frequently form groups for many activities. We provide evidence of differences between lionfish habitat use according to activity, and the size of individual fish. Considering the size is correlated with age, coral reefs appear to be the preferred habitat of older individuals, whereas the youngest lionfish use a diversity of habitats, ranging from mangroves to coral reefs. In addition, this study suggests that predation of lionfish is age-dependent strategy, and depends on time and the tone of the environment. Lionfish do not only use the head-down posture to catch prey but also horizontal and head-up postures. The youngest lionfish hunt mainly in dark areas and during the night while the older fish were observed hunting mostly during the day and in clear areas. These new aspects of lionfish ecology and behaviour are discussed in light of their invasive success.