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8 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Haenn, Nora
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1.
Capítulo de libro
Empowering women? Conditional cash transfers in Mexico
Schmook, Birgit Inge ; Haenn, Nora (coaut.) ; Radel, Claudia (coaut.) ; Navarro Olmedo, Santana (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Money from the government in Latin America. Conditional cash transfer programs and rural lives London and New York : Routledge, 2019 página 97-113 ISBN:978-0-8153-8737-4
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2.
Artículo
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
The gender dynamics of conditional cash transfers and smallholder farming in Calakmul, Mexico
Radel, Claudia ; Schmook, Birgit Inge (coaut.) ; Haenn, Nora (coaut.) ; Green, Lisa (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Women's Studies International Forum Vol. 65 (November 2017), p. 17-27 ISSN: 0277-5395
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

We explore how Oportunidades, Mexico's anti-poverty conditional cash transfer (CCT) program, impacts production and gender dynamics in the smallholder agricultural sector. A 2010 household survey in one southeastern municipality (Calakmul) captured data on Oportunidades receipt, land use and yields, as well as gendered patterns of asset control, decision-making, labor, and income receipt. Our analysis suggests that households with Oportunidades are more likely to engage in semi-subsistence maize cultivation and on average harvest more maize. Thus Oportunidades appears to support semi-subsistence production. We also document persistent gender gaps in land control, decision-making, labor, and income receipt. Nonetheless, we find that households with Oportunidades have on average smaller gaps of particular kinds: women receiving Oportunidades are more likely to hold de jure land rights and to share in income receipt from four main crops. These effects of Oportunidades on gendered smallholder production dynamics are important ones in smallholder women's lives.


3.
- Artículo con arbitraje
The legacy of Mexico's agrarian counter-reforms: reinforcing social hierarchies in Calakmul, Campeche
Navarro Olmedo, Santana ; Haenn, Nora (coaut.) ; Schmook, Birgit Inge (coaut.) ; Radel, Claudia (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Agrarian Change Vol. 16, no. 1 (January 2016), p. 145–167 ISSN: 1471-0366
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

In this paper, we examine how Mexico's 1992 counter-reforms reinforced social hierarchies between two ‘classes’ of residents within three ejidos in an agricultural frontier in Campeche. We carried out qualitative research with 94 ejidatarios, 92 pobladores and 13 government officials. Our research shows that the reforms cemented the second-class status of pobladores, as their access to land, natural resources such as firewood and governmental subsidies is now even more contested. Ejidal residents have responded to these tensions by invoking various conceptions of citizenship to press for different forms of justice. Ejidatarios seek to enforce their legal prerogatives by advocating a tiered citizenship, inflected with aspects of ‘market citizenship’, in which pobladores have less access to resources and voice. Pobladores seek inclusion in the ejido via a cultural model of citizenship built around a ‘civil sociality’. Despite this generalization, both groups also selectively move between and combine these citizenship frameworks to advance their claims.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
A cultural consensus regarding the king vulture?: preliminary findings and their application to Mexican conservation
Haenn, Nora ; Schmook, Birgit Inge (coaut.) ; Reyes Martínez, Yol Poksical Mónica (coaut.) ; Calmé, Sophie (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ethnobiology and Conservation Vol. 3, no. 1 (January 2014), p. 1-22 ISSN: 2238-4782
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Ecosystem management regularly requires bridging diverse cultural perspectives. As a result, researchers commonly assert that including local ecological knowledge in conservation strategies is essential to crafting enduring environmental solutions. Using the case of the king vulture (Sarcoramphus papa), we take preliminary steps in asking how ethnoecology and field biology might be combined in conservation practice. The paper reports on a questionnaire applied to sixty-six local experts in southern Yucatán, home to Mexico’s largest expanse of tropical forest and the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve. Local experts included forest workers, i.e. hunters, loggers, and gum tappers, some of whom worked as guides for field biologists. The research results point to the possibility of a cultural consensus among these experts regarding the bird’s natural history. After outlining this preliminary consensus and contrasting it with academic findings, the paper considers the implications of a consensus for conservation programming.


5.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Improving conservation outcomes with insights from local experts and bureaucracies
Haenn, Nora ; Schmook, Birgit Inge (coaut.) ; Reyes, Yol (coaut.) ; Calmé, Sophie (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 28, no. 4 (August 2014), p. 951–958 ISSN: 0888-8892
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Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

La conservación se describe como construida sobre el conocimiento local, de tal forma que constituye una forma híbrida del conocimiento tradicional y el burocrático. Los investigadores preguntan regularmente cómo el conocimiento local puede aplicarse a programas relacionados con áreas protegidas. Al examinar la producción del conocimiento de la conservación en el sur de México, afirmamos que el conocimiento local ya es central para la conservación. Sin embargo, las normas burocráticas y las diferencias en la identidad social entre los expertos consagrados y los practicantes de la conservación previenen la valoración pública del conocimiento tradicional. Este punto lo hacemos al contrastar dos ejemplos. El primero es la encuesta de una tesis de maestría a los expertos locales con respecto a la biología del zopilote rey (Sarcoramphus papa) en la cual la colecta de datos tuvo lugar en las comunidades adyacentes a la Reserva de la Biósfera de Calakmul. El segundo es un taller patrocinado por la misma reserva que instruyó a los granjeros sobre cómo monitorear a las especies en peligro, incluido el zopilote rey. En ambos ejemplos el conocimiento de la conservación no podría haber existido sin el conocimiento tradicional. En ambos ejemplos, este conocimiento tradicional está ausente del reporte científico. Con base en estos hallazgos, sugerimos que los resultados de la conservación pueden mejorarse al reconocer las contribuciones para el conocimiento que los expertos locales ya hacen a la programación de la conservación.

Resumen en inglés

We describe conservation built on local expertise such that it constitutes a hybrid form of traditional and bureaucratic knowledge. Researchers regularly ask how local knowledge might be applied to programs linked to protected areas. By examining the production of conservation knowledge in southern Mexico, we assert local expertise is already central to conservation. However, bureaucratic norms and social identity differences between lay experts and conservation practitioners prevent the public valuing of traditional knowledge. We make this point by contrasting 2 examples. The first is a master's thesis survey of local experts regarding the biology of the King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa) in which data collection took place in communities adjacent to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve. The second is a workshop sponsored by the same reserve that instructed farmers on how to monitor endangered species, including the King Vulture. In both examples, conservation knowledge would not have existed without traditional knowledge. In both examples, this traditional knowledge is absent from scientific reporting. On the basis of these findings, we suggest conservation outcomes may be improved by recognizing the knowledge contributions local experts already make to conservation programming.


6.
Artículo
Biodiversity is diversity in use: community-based conservation in the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve
Haenn, Nora ;
Contenido en: America Verde Working Papers No. 7 (2000) ISSN: 1098-3848
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

During the early and mid-1990s, the buffer zone of Mexico’s Calakmul Biosphere Reserve in Campeche state (see Map 1) was home to a pervasive program of integrated conservation-development. Because these projects saw high levels of local participation, Calakmul attracted the interest of Mexican and international environmentalists who saw the region as an example of the possibilities for community-based conservation. This paper outlines the content of those programs as well as challenges to their success. In particular, the paper describes how a government-farmer relationship built on patronage and land distribution is at odds with conservation programs that take land out of the agricultural base and anticipate a sustainable economy that has yet to develop. The desire for land is an enduring, politicized issue in Calakmul. This issue is so strong that government authorities have not been able to enforce changes in the Mexican constitution (Article 27) that ended the distribution of farm lands. These constitutional changes took place in 1991, and since that time, authorities have created two new farm communities in Calakmul in order to protect the Reserve from land invasions.

A focus on government-farmer relations is especially relevant to Calakmul where many conservation-development programs began as part of an attempt by Mexico’s ruling PRI (Partido Revolucionario Institucional or Institutional Revolutionary Party) to win regional political support. As I will show, party organizers used conservationdevelopment to counter local opposition to the Reserve and the PRI. Organizers promoted a local farm organization which, with strong federal support, administered conservation-development programs in the region. The farm organization also was linked closely to Reserve management. Success in this politicking created a complex setting where farm leaders promoted themselves as stewards of Calakmul’s ecology. Privately, farmers resisted conservation programs that they believed threatened their subsistence. This combination of electoral politics and local control of environmental management created a powerful local movement in Calakmul in which Calakmul’s people pressed for increased financial aid. This movement was ambiguous about its commitment to conservation in the form of protected areas.


7.
Libro
The environment in anthropology: a reader in ecology, culture, and sustainable living / edited by Nora Haenn and Richard R. Wilk
Haenn, Nora (ed.) ; Wilk, Richard R. (coed.) ;
New York : New York University Press , c2006
Clasificación: 304.2 / E5
Bibliotecas: Chetumal
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030006682 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

8.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Chetumal, SIBE-Campeche
Community formation in frontier Mexico: accepting and rejecting new migrants
Haenn, Nora ;
Clasificación: AR CA/304.809726 / H3
Contenido en: Human Organization Vol. 58, no. 1 (1999), p. 36-43 ISSN: 0018-7259
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040001558 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Chetumal, SIBE-Campeche
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Through a comparison of two communities, this paper addresses village formation in frontier Campeche, Mexico. Mexico's village political unit, the ejido, allows farmers flexibility in deciding who may take up residence in their communities. The paper analyzes how established farmers employ ideas of ethnicity, family, and expectations of social strife to assess the long-term compatibility of newcomers. The paper further examines the role of economic stratification, village factionalism, and development programs in structuring acceptance into a village. The findings challenge prevalent economic explanations for migration and point to the need for research into the interaction of economic and political factors in intrarural migration.