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2 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Hartter, Joel
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1.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Park isolation in anthropogenic landscapes: land change and livelihoods at park boundaries in the African Albertine Rift
Salerno, Jonathan ; Chapman, Colin A. (coaut.) ; Diem, Jeremy E. (coaut.) ; Dowhaniuk, Nicholas (coaut.) ; Goldman, Abraham (coaut.) ; MacKenzie, Catrina A. (coaut.) ; Omeja, Patrick Aria (coaut.) ; Palace, Michael W. (coaut.) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (coaut.) ; Ryan, Sadie J. (coaut.) ; Hartter, Joel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Regional Environmental Change Vol. 18, no. 3 (March 2018), p. 913–928 ISSN: 1436-3798
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Landscapes are changing rapidly in regions where rural people live adjacent to protected parks and reserves. This is the case in highland East Africa, where many parks are increasingly isolated in a matrix of small farms and settlements. In this review, we synthesize published findings and extant data sources to assess the processes and outcomes of park isolation, with a regional focus on people’s livelihoods at park boundaries in the Ugandan Albertine Rift. The region maintains exceptionally high rural population density and growth and is classified as a global biodiversity hotspot. In addition to the impacts of increasing numbers of people, our synthesis highlights compounding factors—changing climate, increasing land value and variable tenure, and declining farm yields—that accelerate effects of population growth on park isolation and widespread landscape change. Unpacking these processes at the regional scale identifies outcomes of isolation in the unprotected landscape—high frequency of human-wildlife conflict, potential for zoonotic disease transmission, land and resource competition, and declining wildlife populations in forest fragments. We recommend a strategy for the management of isolated parks that includes augmenting outreach by park authorities and supporting community needs in the human landscape, for example through healthcare services, while also maintaining hard park boundaries through traditional protectionism. Even in cases where conservation refers to biodiversity in isolated parks, landscape strategies must include an understanding of the local livelihood context in order to ensure long-term sustainable biodiversity protection.


2.
Artículo
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Changing perceptions of protected area benefits and problems around Kibale National Park, Uganda
MacKenzie, Catrina A. ; Salerno, Jonathan (coaut.) ; Hartter, Joel (coaut.) ; Chapman, Colin A. (coaut.) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (coaut.) ; Mwesigye Tumusiime, David (coaut.) ; Drake, Michael (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Environmental Management Vol. 200 (September 2017), p. 217–228 ISSN: 0301-4797
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Local residents' changing perceptions of benefits and problems from living next to a protected area in western Uganda are assessed by comparing household survey data from 2006, 2009, and 2012. Findings are contextualized and supported by long-term data sources for tourism, protected area-based employment, tourism revenue sharing, resource access agreements, and problem animal abundance. We found decreasing perceived benefit and increasing perceived problems associated with the protected area over time, with both trends dominated by increased human-wildlife conflict due to recovering elephant numbers. Proportions of households claiming benefit from specific conservation strategies were increasing, but not enough to offset crop raiding. Ecosystem services mitigated perceptions of problems. As human and animal populations rise, wildlife authorities in Sub-Saharan Africa will be challenged to balance perceptions and adapt policies to ensure the continued existence of protected areas. Understanding the dynamic nature of local people's perceptions provides a tool to adapt protected area management plans, prioritize conservation resources, and engage local communities to support protected areas.