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3 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Huth Schwarz, Anett
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1.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Number of honeybee colonies in areas with high and low beekeeping activity in Southern Mexico
Moritz, Robin F. A ; Bernhard Kraus, F. (coaut.) ; Huth Schwarz, Anett (coaut.) ; Wolf, Stephan (coaut.) ; Castillo Carrillo, Claudia A. (coaut.) ; Paxton, Robert J. (coaut.) ; Vandame, Rémy (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Apidologie Vol. 44, no. 1, (January 2013), p. 113-120 ISSN: 0044-8435
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
51504-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The number of colonies in feral and managed honeybee populations (Apis mellifera) was determined for various sampling locations in Chiapas and Yucatan (Mexico) to assess the impact of apiculture on feral honeybee populations. We used a comparative sampling approach determining the number of colonies in similar habitats and landscapes but with different intensity of beekeeping. Sampling sites included nature reserves, and mango and shaded coffee plantations. The agricultural sites were all set in high-diversity landscapes with plenty of surrounding secondary forest. The number of colonies was determined by genotyping drones caught on drone congregation areas and assigning the drone genotypes to mother queens each heading a colony. We used three sets of linked markers each to achieve sufficient resolution for a precise colony assignment. The estimated colony numbers ranged from 34 to 54 colonies, with an average of 38.3 ± 6.9 colonies in areas with high and 43.5 ± 6.6 colonies in areas with low beekeeping activity. There was no significant difference in colony numbers between the sites with high and low beekeeping activity suggesting that the managed honeybee populations do not substantially add to the overall number of honeybee colonies supported in the wild. This might indicate that restrictions on apicultural activities to prevent any potential conservation conflict with native pollinators might not be useful, since honeybee colonies are very abundant in many different landscapes in Southern Mexico independent of apiculture.


2.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Mating frequency and genetic colony structure of the neotropical bumblebee Bombus wilmattae (Hymenoptera: Apidae)
Huth Schwarz, Anett ; León Gutiérrez, Adolfo (coaut.) ; Vandame, Rémy (coaut.) ; Moritz, Robin F. A. (coaut.) ; Kraus, Frank Bernhard (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Apidologie Vol. 42, no. 4 (Aug. 2011), p. 519-525 ISSN: 0044-8435
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
21623-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

So far, nearly all studies concerning the mating frequency of bumblebees have been conducted with temperate species, showing that single mating seems to be the predominant pattern in bumblebees. Studies involving tropical species, however, are still scarce. Here, we determined the mating frequency of queens of the tropical bumblebee species, Bombus wilmattae by using microsatellite genotyping based on a sample of nine colonies from Chiapas, Southern Mexico. A total of 204 workers were genotyped with microsatellite markers to infer the queen genotype and the number of males with which each queen had mated. Two of the nine queens were doubly mated and seven singly mated. In the colonies with the double-mated queens, the distribution of the patrilines was not even, resulting in effective mating frequencies of 1.34 and 1.70, respectively, and an average relatedness of g = 0.58 ± 0.06.


3.
Artículo
Workers dominate male production in the neotropical bumblebee Bombus wilmattae (Hymenoptera: Apidae)
Huth Schwarz, Anett ; León Gutiérrez, Adolfo (coaut.) ; Vandame, Rémy (coaut.) ; Moritz, Robin F. A. (coaut.) ; Kraus, Frank Bernhard (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Frontiers in Zoology Vol. 8 (June 2011), p. 1-6 ISSN: 1742-9994
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Background: Cooperation and conflict in social insects are closely linked to the genetic structure of the colony. Kin selection theory predicts conflict over the production of males between the workers and the queen and between the workers themselves, depending on intra-colonial relatedness but also on other factors like colony efficiency, sex ratios, cost of worker reproduction and worker dominance behaviour. In most bumblebee (Bombus) species the queen wins this conflict and often dominates male production. However, most studies in bumblebees have been conducted with only a few selected, mostly single mated species from temperate climate regions. Here we study the genetic colony composition of the facultative polyandrous neotropical bumblebee Bombus wilmattae, to assess the outcome of the queen-worker conflict over male production and to detect potential worker policing. Results: A total of 120 males from five colonies were genotyped with up to nine microsatellite markers to infer their parentage. Four of the five colonies were queen right at point of time of male sampling, while one had an uncertain queen status. The workers clearly dominated production of males with an average of 84.9% +/- 14.3% of males being worker sons. In the two doubly mated colonies 62.5% and 96.7% of the male offspring originated from workers and both patrilines participated in male production. Inferring the mother genotypes from the male offspring, between four to eight workers participated in the production of males.

Conclusions: In this study we show that the workers clearly win the queen-worker conflict over male production in B. wilmattae, which sets them apart from the temperate bumblebee species studied so far. Workers clearly dominated male production in the singly as well the doubly mated colonies, with up to eight workers producing male offspring in a single colony. Moreover no monopolization of reproduction by single workers occurred.