Términos relacionados

35 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Moreno, Ricardo
  • «
  • 1 de 4
  • »
1.
Artículo
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Effectiveness of Panama as an intercontinental land bridge for large mammals
Meyer, Ninon France Victoire (autora) ; Moreno, Ricardo (autor) ; Sutherland, Christopher (autor) ; De la Torre, José Antonio (autor) ; Esser, Helen J. (autora) ; Jordan, Christopher A. (autor) ; Olmos, Melva (autora) ; Ortega, Josué (autor) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ; Valdes, Samuel (autor) ; Jansen, Patrick A. (autor) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 34, no. 1 (2020), p. 207–219 ISSN: 1434-4483
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Habitat fragmentation is a primary driver of wildlife loss, and establishment of biological corridors is a common strategy to mitigate this problem. A flagship example is the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor (MBC), which aims to connect protected forest areas between Mexico and Panama to allow dispersal and gene flow offorest organisms. Because forests across Central America have continued to degrade, the functioning of the MBC has been questioned, but reliable estimates of species occurrence were unavailable. Large mammals are suitable indicators of forest functioning, so we assessed their conservation status across the Isthmus of Panama, the narrowest section of the MBC. We used large-scale camera-trap surveys and hierarchical multispecies occupancy models in a Bayesian framework to estimate the occupancy of 9 medium to large mammals and developed an occupancy-weighted connectivity metric to evaluate species-specific functional connectivity. White-lippedpeccary (Tayassu pecari), jaguar (Panthera onca), giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), white-tailed deer(Odocoileus virginianus), and tapir (Tapirus bairdii) had low expected occupancy along the MBC in Panama. Puma (Puma concolor), red brocket deer (Mazama temama), ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), and collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), which are more adaptable, had higher occupancy, even in areas with low forest cover near infrastructure. However, the majority of species were subject to > 1 gap that was larger than their known dispersal distances, suggesting poor connectivity along the MBC in Panama. Based on our results, forests in Darien, Donoso–Santa Fe, and La Amistad International Park are critical for survival of large terrestrial mammals in Panama and 2 areas need restoration.


2.
Artículo
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Precipitous decline of white-lipped peccary populations in Mesoamerica
Thornton, Daniel (autor) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ; Perera Romero, Lucy (autora) ; Radachowsky, Jeremy (autor) ; Hidalgo Mihart, Mircea Gabriel (autor) ; García Anleu, Rony (autor) ; McNab, Roan (autor) ; Mcloughlin, Lee (autor) ; Foster, Rebecca (autora) ; Harmsen, Bart (autor) ; Moreira Ramírez, José Fernando (autor) ; Diaz Santos, Fabricio (autor) ; Jordan, Christopher A. (autor) ; Salom Pérez, Roberto (autor) ; Meyer, Ninon France Victoire (autor) ; Castañeda, Franklin (autor) ; Elvir Valle, Fausto Antonio (autor) ; Ponce Santizo, Gabriela (autora) ; Amit, Ronit (autora) ; Arroyo Arce, Stephanny (autora) ; Thomson, Ian (autor) ; Moreno, Ricardo (autor) ; Schank, Cody J. (autor) ; Arroyo Gerala, Paulina (autora) ; Bárcenas, Horacio V. (autor) ; Brenes Mora, Esteban (autor) ; Calderón, Ana Patricia (autora) ; Cove, Michael V. (autor) ; Gómez Hoyos, Diego (autor) ; González Maya, José F. (autor) ; Guy, Danny (autor) ; Hernández Jiménez, Gerobuam (autor) ; Hofman, Maarten (autor) ; Kays, Roland (autor) ; King, Travis (autor) ; Martinez Menjivar, Marcio Arnoldo (autor) ; Maza, Javier de la (autor) ; León Pérez, Rodrigo (autor) ; Ramos, Víctor Hugo (autor) ; Rivero Hernández, Crysia Marina (autora) ; Romo Asunción, Sergio (autor) ; Juárez López, Rugieri (autor) ; Jesús de la Cruz, Alejandro (autor) ; De la Torre, Jesús Antonio (autor) ; Towns, Valeria (autora) ; Schipper, Jan (autor) ; Portillo Reyes, Hector Orlando (autor) ; Artavia, Adolfo (autor) ; Hernández Pérez, Edwin Luis Oswaldo (autor) ; Martínez, Wilber (autor) ; Urquhart, Gerald R. (autor) ; Quigley, Howard (autor) ; Pardo, Lain E. (autor) ; Sáenz, Joel C. (autor) ; Sanchez, Khiavett (autora) ; Polisar, John (autor) ;
Contenido en: Biological Conservation Vol. 242, no. 108410 (2020), p. 1-12 ISSN: 0006-3207
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Large mammalian herbivores are experiencing population reductions and range declines. However, we lack regional knowledge of population status for many herbivores, particularly in developing countries. Addressing this knowledge gap is key to implementing tailored conservation strategies forspecies whose population declines are highly variable across their range. White-lipped peccaries (Tayassupecari) are important ecosystem engineers in Neotropical forests and are highly sensitive to human disturbance. Despite maintaining a wide distributional range, white-lipped peccaries are experiencing substantial population declines in some portions of their range.We examined the regional distribution and population status of the species in Mesoamerica. We used a combination of techniques, including expert-based mapping and assessment of population status, and data-driven distribution modelling techniques to determine the status and range limits of white-lipped peccaries. Our analysis revealed declining and highly isolated populations of peccaries across Mesoamerica, with a range reduction of 87% from historic distribution and 63% from current IUCN range estimates for the region. White-lipped peccary distribution is affected by indices of human influence and forest cover, and more restricted than other sympatric large herbivores, with their largest populations confined to transboundary reserves. To conserve white-lipped peccaries in Mesoamerica, transboundary efforts will be needed that focus on both forest conservation and hunting management, increased cross-border coordination, and reconsideration of country and regional conservation priorities. Our methodology to detail regional white-lipped peccary status could be employed on other poorly-known large mammals.


Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Species distribution models (SDMs) are statistical tools used to develop continuous predictions of species occurrence. ‘Integrated SDMs’ (ISDMs) are an elaboration of this approach with potential advantages that allow for the dual use of opportunistically collected presence-only data and site-occupancy data from planned surveys. These models also account for survey bias and imperfect detection through the use of a hierarchical modelling framework that separately estimates the species–environment response and detection process. This is particularly helpful for conservation applications and predictions for rare species, where data are often limited and prediction errors may have significant management consequences. Despite this potential importance, ISDMs remain largely untested under a variety of scenarios. We performed an exploration of key modelling decisions and assumptions on an ISDM using the endangered Baird’s tapir (Tapirus bairdii) as a test species. We found that site area had the strongest effect on the magnitude of population estimates and underlying intensity surface and was driven by estimates of model intercepts. Selecting a site area that accounted for the individual movements of the species within an average home range led to population estimates that coincided with expert estimates. ISDMs that do not account for the individual movements of species will likely lead to less accurate estimates of species intensity (number of individuals per unit area) and thus overall population estimates.

This bias could be severe and highly detrimental to conservation actions if uninformed ISDMs are used to estimate global populations of threatened and data-deficient species, particularly those that lack natural history and movement information. However, the ISDM was consistently the most accurate model compared to other approaches, which demonstrates the importance of this new modelling framework and the ability to combine opportunistic data with systematic survey data. Thus, we recommend researchers use ISDMs with conservative movement information when estimating population sizes of rare and data-deficient species. ISDMs could be improved by using a similar parameterization to spatial capture–recapture models that explicitly incorporate animal movement as a model parameter, which would further remove the need for spatial subsampling prior to implementation.


4.
Artículo
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Canid collision - expanding populations of coyotes (Canis latrans) and crab-eating foxes (Cerdocyon thous) meet up in Panama
Hody, Allison W. (autor) ; Moreno, Ricardo S. (autor) ; Meyer, Ninon France Victoire (autora) ; Pacifici, Krishna (autor) ; Kays, Roland (autor) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Mammalogy Vol. 100, no. 6 (December 2019), p. 1819-1830 ISSN: 1545-1542
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en español

El surgimiento del Istmo de Panamá hace 3–4 millones de años permitió las primeras dispersiones de mamíferos entre Norteamérica y Sudamérica, el cual se conoce como el Gran Intercambio Biótico Americano. Hoy en día, la deforestación no solo amenaza la conectividad histórica entre los bosques, sino también crea un os habitats y adecuados hábitats para las especies de zonas abiertas, como se ha documentado con las expansiones recientes del coyote (Canis latrans) desde Norteamérica y del zorro cangrejero (Cerdocyon thous) desde Sudamérica. Nosotros utilizamos trampas cámara para mapear las expansiones de éstas dos especies en el este de Panamá; encontramos que para el año 2015, las poblaciones de coyotes habían colonizado la mayor parte del área agrícola al Oeste del Lago Bayano. La mayoría de nuestros muestreos con trampas cámara al Este documentaron zorros cangrejeros, y con base a individuos atropellados, tenemos la evidencia que algunos zorros cangrejeros ya habían avanzado más hacia el Oeste. Sin embargo, nunca se registraron ambas especies en el mismo muestreo con trampas cámara, lo cual sugiere que ambas especies se evitan a una escala espacio-temporal fina. Se utilizó un enfoque de fusión de datos para construir modelos de distribución de especies que combinaban nuestros datos de trampas cámara con registros obtenidos de la literatura y de animales atropellados. Aunque los datos auxiliares mejoraron la precisión prevista para ambas especies, no sobresalió un patrón de selección de hábitat claro, lo cual podría reflejar las tendencias generalistas de estos cánidos, o el hecho de que ambos se encuentren en las etapas iniciales de colonización de la región. Los registros fotográficos mostraron que ambas especies eran nocturnas y revelaron que los coyotes tenían una morfología similar a la de los perros domésticos, indicando una posible hibridación.

Nuestro monitoreo continuo en el Darién, documentó individuos de coyote moviéndose en el borde Oeste de la provincia en el 2016 y en el 2018. Esto significa que solo queda el gran bosques del Darién entre los coyotes y Sudamérica. Si la deforestación sigue en la región, estos dos cánidos invasores podrían representar los primeros de un nuevo “No-Tan-Gran Intercambio Biótico Americano” donde las especies generalistas y adaptadas a la perturbación humana cruzan los continentes y amenazan la biota nativa.

Resumen en inglés

The rise of the Panamanian Isthmus 3-4 million years ago enabled the first dispersal of mammals between North and South America in what is known as the Great American Biotic Interchange. Modern deforestation threatens the historic forest connectivity and creates new habitat for open-country species, as documented by recent expansions of North American coyotes (Canis latrans) and South American crabeating foxes (Cerdocyon thous) into Central America. We used camera traps to map the expansions of these species into eastern Panama and found that, by 2015, coyote populations had colonized most agricultural area west of Lago Bayano. Most of our camera arrays east of this point documented crabeating foxes, and evidence from roadkills showed some foxes had advanced farther west, but we never documented both species at the same camera-trap array, suggesting the possibility of fine-scale spatial avoidance.

We used a data fusion approach to build species distribution models combining our camera surveys with records from the literature and roadkill. While the auxiliary data improved the predictive accuracy for both species, few clear habitat patterns emerged, which might reflect the generalist tendencies of these canids, or the fact that both are in the early stages of colonizing the region. Camera-trap photos showed that both species were nocturnal and revealed some dog-like morphology in coyotes, which could indicate their recent hybridization with dogs (Canis familiaris). Our continued monitoring of the Darién documented single coyotes moving through the western edge of the area in 2016 and 2018. This leaves only the great Darién forests between coyotes and South America. If deforestation continues in the region, these two invasive canids could represent the first of a new, Not-So-Great American Biotic Interchange, where generalist species adapted to human disturbance cross continents and threaten native biota


PDF
Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

Se evaluaron mediante la técnica de producción de gas in vitro, fuentes energéticas locales (melaza, Zea mays L. y Musa paradisiaca L.) sobre la fermentación ruminal y producción de metano de diversos forrajes usados en un sistema silvopastoril con Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania, Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.) y Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham, con ovinos. Se usaron cinco borregos Pelibuey x Katahdin 40 ± 3 (µ±DE) kg como donantes de líquido ruminal. Se analizaron cinco tratamientos (dietas) con diferentes mezclas de follaje de arbóreas y fuentes energéticas en un diseño experimental completamente al azar. M. paradisiaca y Z. mays presentaron los mayores registros de volumen (V) máximo en producción de gas (544 y 467 ml/g-¹ MS, respectivamente) (P≤0.05). El follaje de G. sepium y L. leucocephala tuvieron los menores valores de V (253 y 180 ml/g-¹ MS, respectivamente) (P≤0.05). La dieta D4 GMP (48 % P. maximum, 30 % G. sepium, 7 % Zea mays, 15 % M. paradisiaca) registro el mayor valor de V. No hubo diferencia (P>0.05) en la producción de metano en las dietas usadas, teniendo un rango de 6.31 a 9.60 de LCH4/kg MSDIG. Se generó un índice de emisión potencial de gases fermentables (IPEGF), el cual sugirió que dietas con carbohidratos de lenta fermentación, contribuyen a un índice más alto de emisión de gases. Por su mejoramiento en la calidad de las dietas y en contribuir en una baja de emisiones de CH4, se sugiere el manejo de arbóreas forrajeras como G. sepium y L. leucocephala, incorporando fuentes energéticas locales.


PDF
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Se evaluaron mediante la técnica de producción de gas in vitro, fuentes energéticas locales (melaza, Zea mays L.y Musa paradisiaca L.) sobre la fermentación ruminal y producción de metano de diversos forrajes usados en un sistema silvopastoril con Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania, Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.)yLeucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham, con ovinos. Se usaroncinco borregos Pelibuey x Katahdin 40 ± 3 (μ±DE) kg como donantes de líquido ruminal. Se analizaron cinco tratamientos (dietas) con diferentes mezclas de follaje de arbóreas y fuentes energéticas en un diseño experimental completamente al azar. M. paradisiacay Z. mayspresentaron los mayores registros devolumen (V) máximo en producción de gas (544 y 467 ml/g-1 MS, respectivamente) (P≤0.05). El follaje de G. sepiumy L. leucocephala tuvieron los menores valores de V (253 y 180 ml/g-1 MS, respectivamente) (P≤0.05). La dieta D4 GMP (48 % P. maximum, 30 % G. sepium, 7 % Zea mays, 15 % M. paradisiaca) registro el mayor valor de V. No hubo diferencia(P>0.05) en la producción de metano en las dietas usadas, teniendo un rango de 6.31 a 9.60 de LCH4/kg MSDIG. Se generó un índice de emisión potencial de gases fermentables (IPEGF), el cual sugirió que dietas con carbohidratos de lenta fermentación, contribuyen a un índice más alto de emisión de gases. Por su mejoramiento en la calidad de las dietas y en contribuir en una baja de emisiones de CH4, se sugiere el manejo de arbóreas forrajeras como G. sepium y L. leucocephala,incorporando fuentes energéticas locales.

Resumen en inglés

Ruminal fermentation and methane production in a sheep silvopastoral system were quantified with the in vitro gas production technique. Evaluations were done of local energy sources (molasses, Zea mays L. and Musa paradisiaca L.), of the base forage (Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania), of forage tree foliage (Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.) and Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham), and diets combining these elements. Ruminal fluid was collected from five sheep (Pelibuey x Katahdin; 40 ± 3 kg). Five treatments (diets) containing different mixtures of forage tree foliage, energy sources and the base forage were analyzed in a completely random experimental design. Maximum gas volume production (V) was observed in M. paradisiaca (544 ml/g-¹ DM) and Z. mays (467 ml/g-¹ DM) (P≤0.05). The lowest V values were for the foliage of G. sepium (253 ml/g-¹ DM) and L. leucocephala (180 ml/g-¹ DM) (P≤0.05). Of the diets, D4GMP (48% P. maximum, 30% G. sepium, 7% Z. mays, 15% M. paradisiaca) had the highest V value. Methane production ranged from 6.31 to 9.60 L/Kg digested DM, and did not differ between treatments (P>0.05). Data were used to generate a potential fermentable gases emission index, which suggested that the diets containing slow fermenting carbohydrates resulted in higher gas emission rates. Inclusion of forage trees and local energy sources in sheep silvopastoral management systems can improve diet quality and contributeto reducing CH4 emissions.


7.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Spatial ecology of a large and endangered tropical mammal: the white-lipped peccary in Darién, Panama
Meyer, Ninon France Victoire (autor) ; Moreno, Ricardo (autor) ; Martínez Morales, Miguel Ángel (autor) (-2020) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors Switzerland, Suiza : Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019 páginas 77-93 ISBN:978-3-030-03462-7
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
9788-30 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en español

Large mammals are negatively affected by habitat loss, fragmentation, and hunting. Thus, many of them are nowadays in urgent need of conservation actions to decrease their risk of extinction. Examining space use of large mammals by integrating empirical data and modeling is a primary prerequisite both for basic ecological understanding and for effective conservation planning. In this study, we investigated the basic spatial ecology of the white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari), a keystone ungulate species in the Neotropics. Specifically, we examined the home range and habitat use of the species in the Darién, Panama, which constitutes one of the last remaining strongholds for the species in Mesoamerica. In May and July 2016, we fitted GPS collars on two white-lipped peccaries from different herds and monitored them during 15 months and 1 month. The two herds used an area covered by mature forest and did not venture into disturbed areas during the time we monitored them. Both herds displayed home ranging behavior, and their estimated home range sizes were 58 km2 and 25 km2. The herd that was followed during 15 months showed little difference between seasonal home ranges, suggesting that the forest of Darién provided enough resources throughout the year for the herd to remain in the same area. Based on this study and other research in Panama, we consider that the white-lipped peccary population in Darién is healthy contrasting with many other sites in the country. Management actions need to address both the hunting pressure and the protection of large continuous tracts of undisturbed forests to guarantee the persistence of the species in Panama.


8.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Wet and dry tropical forests show opposite successional pathways in wood density but converge over time
Poorter, Lourens (autor) ; Rozendaal, Danaë M. A. (autora) ; Bongers, Frans (autor) ; Almeida Cortez, Jarcilene Silva (autora) ; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica María (autora) ; Álvarez, Francisco S. (autor) ; Andrade, José Luis (autor) ; Arreola Villa, Luis Felipe (autor) ; Balvanera, Patricia (autora) ; Becknell, Justin M. (autor) ; Bentos, Tony V. (autor) ; Bhaskar, Radika (autora) ; Boukili, Vanessa (autora) ; Brancalion, Pedro H. S. (autor) ; Broadbent, Eben North (autor) ; César, Ricardo G. (autor) ; Chave, Jerome (autor) ; Chazdon, Robin L. (autor) ; Dalla Colletta, Gabriel (autor) ; Craven, Dylan (autor) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (autor) ; Denslow, Julie Sloan (autora) ; Dent, Daisy H. (autora) ; DeWalt, Saara J. (autora) ; Díaz García, Elisa (autora) ; Dupuy Rada, Juan Manuel (autor) ; Durán, Sandra M. (autora) ; Espírito Santo, Mario M. (autor) ; Fandiño, María C. (autora) ; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson (autor) ; Finegan, Bryan (autor) ; Granda Moser, Vanessa (autora) ; Hall, Jefferson S. (autor) ; Hernández Stefanoni, José Luis (autor) ; Jakovac, Catarina C. (autora) ; Junqueira, André B. (autor) ; Kennard, Deborah (autra) ; Lebrija Trejos, Edwin (autor) ; Letcher, Susan G. (autora) ; Lohbeck, Madelon (autora) ; López, Omar R. (autor) ; Marín Spiotta, Erika (autora) ; Martínez Ramos, Miguel (autor) ; Martins, Sebastião Venâncio (autor) ; Massoca, Paulo E. S. (autor) ; Meave, Jorge A. (autor) ; Mesquita, Rita C. G (autora) ; Mora Ardila, Francisco (autor) ; Moreno, Vanessa de Souza (autora) ; Müller, Sandra C. (autora) ; Muñoz, Rodrigo (autor) ; Muscarella, Robert (autor) ; Nolasco de Oliveira Neto, Silvio (autor) ; Nunes, Yule R. F. (autor) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (autora) ; Paz, Horacio (autor) ; Peña Claros, Marielos (autor) ; Piotto, Daniel (autor) ; Ruíz, Jorge (autor) ; Sanaphre Villanueva, Lucía (autora) ; Sánchez Azofeifa, Gerardo Arturo (autor) ; Schwartz, Naomi B. (autora) ; Steininger, Marc K. (autor) ; Thomas, William Wayt (autor) ; Toledo, Marisol (autora) ; Uriarte, María (autora) ; Utrera, Luis P. (autor) ; van Breugel, Michiel (autor) ; van der Sande, Masha T. (coaut.) ; Van Der Wal, Hans (coaut.) ; Veloso, María D. M. (autora) ; Vester, Henricus F. M. (autor) ; Vieira, Ima Celia G. (autora) ; Villa, Pedro Manuel (autor) ; Williamson, G. Bruce (autor) ; Wright, S. Joseph (autor) ; Zanini, Kátia J. (autora) ; Zimmerman, Jess K. (autor) ; Westoby, Mark (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Nature Ecology & Evolution Vol. 3, no. 6 (Jun 2019), p. 928–934 ISSN: 2397-334X
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Tropical forests are converted at an alarming rate for agricultural use and pastureland, but also regrow naturally through secondary succession. For successful forest restoration, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of secondary succession. These mechanisms may vary across forest types, but analyses across broad spatial scales are lacking. Here, we analyse forest recovery using 1,403 plots that differ in age since agricultural abandonment from 50 sites across the Neotropics. We analyse changes in community composition using species-specific stem wood density (WD), which is a key trait for plant growth, survival and forest carbon storage. In wet forest, succession proceeds from low towards high community WD (acquisitive towards conservative trait values), in line with standard successional theory. However, in dry forest, succession proceeds from high towards low community WD (conservative towards acquisitive trait values), probably because high WD reflects drought tolerance in harsh early successional environments. Dry season intensity drives WD recovery by influencing the start and trajectory of succession, resulting in convergence of the community WD over time as vegetation cover builds up. These ecological insights can be used to improve species selection for reforestation. Reforestation species selected to establish a first protective canopy layer should, among other criteria, ideally have a similar WD to the early successional communities that dominate under the prevailing macroclimatic conditions.


9.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Legume abundance along successional and rainfall gradients in Neotropical forests
Gei, Maga ; Rozendaal, Danaë M. A. (coaut.) ; Poorter, Lourens (coaut.) ; Bongers, Frans (coaut.) ; Sprent, Janet I. (coaut.) ; Garner, Mira D. (coaut.) ; Aide, T. Mitchell (coaut.) ; Andrade, José Luis (coaut.) ; Balvanera, Patricia (coaut.) ; Becknell, Justin M. (coaut.) ; Brancalion, Pedro H. S. (coaut.) ; Cabral, George A. L. (coaut.) ; Gomes César, Ricardo (coaut.) ; Chazdon, Robin L. (coaut.) ; Cole, Rebecca J. (coaut.) ; Dalla Colletta, Gabriel (coaut.) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (coaut.) ; Denslow, Julie S. (coaut.) ; Dent, Daisy H. (coaut.) ; DeWalt, Saara J. (coaut.) ; Dupuy, Juan Manuel (coaut.) ; Durán, Sandra M. (coaut.) ; do Espírito Santo, Mário Marcos (coaut.) ; Fernandes, G. Wilson (coaut.) ; Ferreira Nunes, Yule Roberta (coaut.) ; Finegan, Bryan (coaut.) ; Granda Moser, Vanessa (coaut.) ; Hall, Jefferson S. (coaut.) ; Hernández Stefanoni, José Luis (coaut.) ; Junqueira, André B. (coaut.) ; Kennard, Deborah (coaut.) ; Lebrija Trejos, Edwin (coaut.) ; Letcher, Susan G. (coaut.) ; Lohbeck, Madelon (coaut.) ; Marín Spiotta, Erika (coaut.) ; Martínez Ramos, Miguel (coaut.) ; Meave, Jorge A. (coaut.) ; Menge, Duncan N. L. (coaut.) ; Mora Ardila, Francisco (coaut.) ; Muñoz, Rodrigo (coaut.) ; Muscarella, Robert (coaut.) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (coaut.) ; Orihuela Belmonte, Dolores Edith (coaut.) ; Ostertag, Rebecca (coaut.) ; Peña Claros, Marielos (coaut.) ; Pérez García, Eduardo A. (coaut.) ; Piotto, Daniel (coaut.) ; Reich, Peter B. (coaut.) ; Reyes García, Casandra (coaut.) ; Rodríguez Velázquez, Jorge (coaut.) ; Romero Pérez, Isabel Eunice (coaut.) ; Sanaphre-Villanueva, Lucía (coaut.) ; Sánchez Azofeifa, Arturo (coaut.) ; Schwartz, Naomi B. (coaut.) ; Silva de Almeida, Arlete (coaut.) ; Almeida Cortez, Jarcilene Silva (coaut.) ; Silver, Whendee L. (coaut.) ; de Souza Moreno, Vanessa (coaut.) ; Sullivan, Benjamin W. (coaut.) ; Swenson, Nathan G. (coaut.) ; Uriarte, María (coaut.) ; van Breugel, Michiel (coaut.) ; Van Der Wal, Hans (coaut.) ; Magalhães Veloso, Maria Das Dores (coaut.) ; Vester, Hans F. M. (coaut.) ; Guimarães Vieira, Ima Célia (coaut.) ; Zimmerman, Jess K. (coaut.) ; Powers, Jennifer S. (caout.) ;
Contenido en: Nature Ecology and Evolution Vol. 2, no. 7 (Jun. 2018), p. 1104–1111 ISSN: 2397-334X
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of forest inventory plots from a network of 42 Neotropical forest chronosequences. During the first three decades of natural forest regeneration, legume basal area is twice as high in dry compared with wet secondary forests. The tremendous ecological success of legumes in recently disturbed, water-limited forests is likely to be related to both their reduced leaflet size and ability to fix N2, which together enhance legume drought tolerance and water-use efficiency. Earth system models should incorporate these large-scale successional and climatic patterns of legume dominance to provide more accurate estimates of the maximum potential for natural nitrogen fixation across tropical forests.


10.
- Libro con arbitraje
Morral de experiencias para la seguridad y soberanía alimentarias: aprendizajes de organizaciones civiles en el sureste mexicano / coordinación: Linda Lönnqvist ; autores: Mateo Mier y Terán Giménez Cacho, Nora Tzec Caamal, Yolotzin Bravo Espinosa ; co-autores: Helda Morales, Linda Lönnqvist, Carolina Anaya Zamora, Elvia Quintanar Quintanar, Ana García Sempere, Bruce Ferguson, Elizabeth Sotelo Paz, Rose Cohen
Lönnqvist, Linda (coordinadora) ; Mier y Terán Giménez Cacho, Mateo (coaut.) ; Tzec Caamal, Nora Salomé (coaut.) ; Bravo Espinosa, Yolotzin Magdalena (coaut.) ; Morales, H. (coaut.) ; Lönnqvist, Linda (coaut.) ; Anaya Zamora, Ixchel Carolina (coaut.) ; Quintanar Quintanar, Elvia (coaut.) ; García Sempere, Ana (coaut.) ; Ferguson, Bruce G. (coaut.) (1967-) ; Sotelo Paz, Clara Elizabeth (coaut.) ; Cohen, Rose (coaut.) ;
San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas, México : El Colegio de la Frontera Sur :: Community Agroecology Network , 2018
Clasificación: EE/363.8097275 / M6
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040006876 (Disponible) , ECO040006875 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030008742 (Disponible) , ECO030008741 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010019564 (Disponible) , ECO010019563 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020013622 (Disponible) , ECO020013621 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
ECO050006428 (Disponible) , ECO050006427 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
PDF
Índice | Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

El Morral de experiencias integra dos años de lecciones sobre cómo trabajar con comunidades en los temas de seguridad y soberanía alimentarias y agroecología, que dedicamos a las organizaciones de la sociedad civil (OSC). Es el resultado del ensayo de innovaciones para procesos por parte de los participantes de 23 organizaciones en un proyecto de aprendizaje sobre la seguridad y soberanía alimentarias en el sureste de México. Contiene tres secciones principales: • Una descripción breve del contexto en el cual las OSC trabajan en los estados de Campeche, Chiapas, Quintana Roo y Yucatán. • Consejos para cada paso en el trabajo comunitario, desde los primeros saludos, el diagnóstico participativo, la puesta en marcha de actividades, el monitoreo y la evaluación, y el desarrollo de indicadores, hasta el retiro de la OSC, todo desde las experiencias concretas de las organizaciones. • Descripciones y reflexiones detalladas sobre los procesos piloteados en CASSA, entre ellos, una aproximación a la agroecología maya para familias, un taller de metodología participativa e incluyente, herramientas para fortalecer las alianzas entre las OSC, reflexiones sobre los múltiples caminos para la comercialización de alimentos, fundamentos para la organización comunitaria de largo plazo y maneras de utilizar el video en torno a los saberes locales, todo para fortalecer el trabajo hacia la seguridad y soberanía alimentarias. Además, contiene escritos sobre mujeres campesinas, trabajo con jóvenes, cómo tratar el tema de plaguicidas, herramientas de talleres, y de monitoreo y evaluación.

El Morral de experiencias es el resultado del proyecto Comunidad de Aprendizaje para la Seguridad y Soberanía Alimentarias en Chiapas y la Península de Yucatán o CASSA, realizado entre la Red de Agroecología Comunitaria (o Community Agroecology NetWork, CAN), de Santa Cruz, California, y el equipo Masificación de la Agroecología en El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, sede San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas. Tomó lugar entre el 2015 y el 2018 con financiamiento de la Fundación Kellogg. Advertencia: aunque el propósito del Morral es compartir experiencias para mejorar nuestro trabajo, no es un manual con instrucciones paso por paso. El lector tiene que reflexionar y adaptar los aprendizajes descritos para su propio contexto y situación.

Índice

Prólogo
¿De dónde salió el Morral?
Introducción y Contexto
El Morral de experiencias: ¿de qué se trata?
El proyecto Comunidad de Aprendizaje sobre Seguridad y Soberanía alimentarias (CASSA) y el Morral de experiencias
Tres secciones del Morral: pasos de acompañamiento, CASSA y temas transversales
Glosario de términos de CASSA
Capítulo 1. Soberanía Alimentaria y Organizaciones de la Sociedad Civil en Chiapas y en la Península de Yucatán
1.1. Nixtamalización, akalchés y neoliberalismo
1.2. Contexto geográfico e histórico de la alimentación en la Península de Yucatán y en Chiapas
1.3. Enfoques de organizaciones civiles en relación con la seguridad alimentaria y soberanía alimentarias y la agroecología
Capítulo 2. Pistas de Buenas Prácticas Para el Trabajo Comunitario
2.1. Compartiendo experiencias en el camino hacia la soberanía alimentaria
2.2. ¿Cómo aproximarse respetuosamente a las comunidades?
2.3. ¿Cómo hacer un diagnóstico participativo del sistema alimentario?
2.4. Definición participativa de indicadores de la soberanía alimentaria
2.5. ¿Cómo encontramos soluciones de forma participativa?
2.6. ¿Cómo ponemos en marcha nuestro proyecto?
2.7. Monitoreo y evaluación: participación y reflexión
2.8. Construyendo bases sólidas en la comunidad para dar continuidad al proceso
2.9. Retirándose de la comunidad con gracia
Capítulo 3. Intercambios, Aprendizajes e Innovaciones Para la Seguridad y Soberanía Alimentarias (SSA)
3.1. Introducción
3.2. Grupo temático Agroecología Maya: la agroecología familiar
3.3. Grupo temático Alianzas entre OSC: ¿qué necesitas para formar una alianza duradera?
3.4. Grupo temático Generación de Ingresos: múltiples vías para la comercialización de alimentos
3.5. Grupo temático Metodologías Participativas e Incluyentes para la seguridad y soberanía alimentarias: se empieza por cambiar nosotros mismos

3.6. Grupo temático Organización Social Comunitaria con Visión a Largo Plazo: herramientas que fortalecen procesos comunitarios
3.7. Grupo temático Saberes Locales: todos tenemos una historia que contar. El video como herramienta de revalorización y visibilización de los saberes locales
3.8. Aprendizajes generales de los grupos temáticos
Bibliografía
Anexos. Otras Miradas Hacia la Soberanía Alimentaria
Más allá del proyecto CASSA
1. Procesos educativos para la soberanía y seguridad alimentarias
1.1. Laboratorios para la Vida: agroecología y ciencia en las escuelas
1.2. La Escuela de Agricultura Ecológica U Yits Ka’an
2. Recuperando el control de los sistemas alimentarios
2.1. Las Fiestas de Semillas Nativas en Campeche
2.2. Red de Productores y Consumidores Responsables y el Tianguis Agroecológico y Artesanal
3. El trabajo del Colectivo Isitame con las mujeres campesinas
4. Los jóvenes y la soberanía alimentaria. Cultivando consciencia y cambio
5. Estrategias para disminuir el uso de plaguicidas en trabajo productivo
6. Metodologías clásicas de la SSA y agroecología
7. Herramientas para talleres de desarrollo participativo de indicadores
8. Marco de Monitoreo y Evaluación del proyecto CASSA
9. Fichas de las organizaciones participantes en CASSA
Semblanza Curricular de Autores y Autoras