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8 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Moritz, Robin F. A.
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1.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Number of honeybee colonies in areas with high and low beekeeping activity in Southern Mexico
Moritz, Robin F. A ; Bernhard Kraus, F. (coaut.) ; Huth Schwarz, Anett (coaut.) ; Wolf, Stephan (coaut.) ; Castillo Carrillo, Claudia A. (coaut.) ; Paxton, Robert J. (coaut.) ; Vandame, Rémy (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Apidologie Vol. 44, no. 1, (January 2013), p. 113-120 ISSN: 0044-8435
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
51504-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The number of colonies in feral and managed honeybee populations (Apis mellifera) was determined for various sampling locations in Chiapas and Yucatan (Mexico) to assess the impact of apiculture on feral honeybee populations. We used a comparative sampling approach determining the number of colonies in similar habitats and landscapes but with different intensity of beekeeping. Sampling sites included nature reserves, and mango and shaded coffee plantations. The agricultural sites were all set in high-diversity landscapes with plenty of surrounding secondary forest. The number of colonies was determined by genotyping drones caught on drone congregation areas and assigning the drone genotypes to mother queens each heading a colony. We used three sets of linked markers each to achieve sufficient resolution for a precise colony assignment. The estimated colony numbers ranged from 34 to 54 colonies, with an average of 38.3 ± 6.9 colonies in areas with high and 43.5 ± 6.6 colonies in areas with low beekeeping activity. There was no significant difference in colony numbers between the sites with high and low beekeeping activity suggesting that the managed honeybee populations do not substantially add to the overall number of honeybee colonies supported in the wild. This might indicate that restrictions on apicultural activities to prevent any potential conservation conflict with native pollinators might not be useful, since honeybee colonies are very abundant in many different landscapes in Southern Mexico independent of apiculture.


2.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Mating frequency and genetic colony structure of the neotropical bumblebee Bombus wilmattae (Hymenoptera: Apidae)
Huth Schwarz, Anett ; León Gutiérrez, Adolfo (coaut.) ; Vandame, Rémy (coaut.) ; Moritz, Robin F. A. (coaut.) ; Kraus, Frank Bernhard (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Apidologie Vol. 42, no. 4 (Aug. 2011), p. 519-525 ISSN: 0044-8435
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
21623-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

So far, nearly all studies concerning the mating frequency of bumblebees have been conducted with temperate species, showing that single mating seems to be the predominant pattern in bumblebees. Studies involving tropical species, however, are still scarce. Here, we determined the mating frequency of queens of the tropical bumblebee species, Bombus wilmattae by using microsatellite genotyping based on a sample of nine colonies from Chiapas, Southern Mexico. A total of 204 workers were genotyped with microsatellite markers to infer the queen genotype and the number of males with which each queen had mated. Two of the nine queens were doubly mated and seven singly mated. In the colonies with the double-mated queens, the distribution of the patrilines was not even, resulting in effective mating frequencies of 1.34 and 1.70, respectively, and an average relatedness of g = 0.58 ± 0.06.


3.
Artículo
Workers dominate male production in the neotropical bumblebee Bombus wilmattae (Hymenoptera: Apidae)
Huth Schwarz, Anett ; León Gutiérrez, Adolfo (coaut.) ; Vandame, Rémy (coaut.) ; Moritz, Robin F. A. (coaut.) ; Kraus, Frank Bernhard (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Frontiers in Zoology Vol. 8 (June 2011), p. 1-6 ISSN: 1742-9994
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Background: Cooperation and conflict in social insects are closely linked to the genetic structure of the colony. Kin selection theory predicts conflict over the production of males between the workers and the queen and between the workers themselves, depending on intra-colonial relatedness but also on other factors like colony efficiency, sex ratios, cost of worker reproduction and worker dominance behaviour. In most bumblebee (Bombus) species the queen wins this conflict and often dominates male production. However, most studies in bumblebees have been conducted with only a few selected, mostly single mated species from temperate climate regions. Here we study the genetic colony composition of the facultative polyandrous neotropical bumblebee Bombus wilmattae, to assess the outcome of the queen-worker conflict over male production and to detect potential worker policing. Results: A total of 120 males from five colonies were genotyped with up to nine microsatellite markers to infer their parentage. Four of the five colonies were queen right at point of time of male sampling, while one had an uncertain queen status. The workers clearly dominated production of males with an average of 84.9% +/- 14.3% of males being worker sons. In the two doubly mated colonies 62.5% and 96.7% of the male offspring originated from workers and both patrilines participated in male production. Inferring the mother genotypes from the male offspring, between four to eight workers participated in the production of males.

Conclusions: In this study we show that the workers clearly win the queen-worker conflict over male production in B. wilmattae, which sets them apart from the temperate bumblebee species studied so far. Workers clearly dominated male production in the singly as well the doubly mated colonies, with up to eight workers producing male offspring in a single colony. Moreover no monopolization of reproduction by single workers occurred.


4.
Artículo
Gene flow is maintained by polyandry and male dispersal in the army ant Eciton burchellii
Jaffé, Rodolfo ; Moritz, Robin F. A. (coaut.) ; Bernhard Kraus, F. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Population Ecology Vol. 51, no. 2 (2009), p. 227-236
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The combination of haplodiploidy, complementary sex determination and eusociality constrains the effective population size (N e) of social Hymenoptera far more than in any other insect group. Additional limitations on N e occur in army ants since they have wingless queens and colony fission, both of which are factors causing restricted maternal gene flow and high population viscosity. Therefore, winged army ant males gain a particular significance to ensure dispersal, facilitate gene flow and avoid inbreeding. Based on population genetic analyses with microsatellite markers, we studied a population of the Neotropical army ant Eciton burchellii, finding a high level of heterozygosity, weak population differentiation and no evidence for inbreeding. Moreover, by using sibship reconstruction analyses, we quantified the actual number of male contributing colonies represented in a queen’s mate sample, demonstrating that, through extreme multiple mating, the queens are able to sample the genes of males from up to ten different colonies, usually located within an approximate radius of 1 km. We finally correlated the individual mating success of each male contributing colony with the relative siring success of individual males and found a significant colony-dependent male fitness component. Our results imply that the dispersal and mating system of these army ants seem to enhance gene flow and minimise the deleterious effects associated with small effective population size.


5.
Libro
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Memorias: VI congreso mesoamericano sobre abejas nativas [Recurso electrónico] / editado por Carmen Lucía Yurrita
Congreso Mesoamericano sobre Abejas Nativas (VI : 2009 : Antigua Guatemala) ; Yurrita, Carmen Lucía (ed.) ;
Guatemala, Guatemala : Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala, Centro de Estudios Conservacionistas :: Florida Center for Instructional Technology , [2009]
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en español

Las abejas constituyen un grupo de insectos importante, tanto ecológica como económicamente, debido a su participación en los procesos de polinización de una gran variedad de plantas silvestres y cultivadas. Además, el grupo de las abejas sociales es de especial interés para los humanos debido a su capacidad de almacenar miel y polen en sus colmenas. En la región mesoamericana este último grupo, comúnmente conocido como abejas sin aguijón, es especialmente importante ya que constituye, para muchas comunidades rurales, una fuente alternativa de alimento y medicina. Actualmente, la diversidad biológica nativa de la mayor parte del planeta está amenazada debido a la pérdida de hábitat natural, pero también por causa de la introducción de especies no nativas. Debido a esto, se hace necesario difundir los conocimientos que se generan sobre la diversidad biológica de nuestros países, para poder emplearlas de una manera racional.


6.
Artículo
The size of wild honeybee populations (Apis mellifera) and its implications for the conservation of honeybees
Moritz, Robin F. A ; Kraus, Frank Bernhard (coaut.) ; Kryger, Per (coaut.) ; Crewe, Robin M. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Insect Conservation Vol. 11, no. 4 (December 2007), p. 391-397 ISSN: 1366-638X
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The density of wild honeybee colonies (Apis mellifera) in the African dry highland savannahs was estimated in three Nature Reserves in Gauteng, South Africa (Ezemvelo, Leeuwfontein, Suikerbosrand) based on the genotypes of drones which were caught at drone congregation areas. Densities were estimated to range between 12.4 and 17.6 colonies per square kilometer. In addition colony densities were estimated in two German National parks (Mu¨ ritz and Hochharz) and a commercial mating apiary. The density of colonies was significantly lower at the German sampling sites with estimates of 2.4–3.2 colonies per square kilometer, which closely matches the nationwide density of colonies kept by beekeepers. This shows that the densities of colonies observed in wild populations under the harsh conditions of the African dry savannahs exceeds that of Germany by far, in spite of intensive beekeeping. The intensity of apiculture in Europe is therefore unlikely to compensate for the loss of habitats suitable for wild honeybees due to agriculture, forestry and other cultivation of land.


7.
Artículo
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Trade-off between survival and male reproduction in Varroa destructor infested honeybee colonies (Apis mellifera)
Kraus, Frank Bernhard ; Büchler, R. (coaut.) ; Siede, R. (coaut.) ; Berg, S. (coaut.) ; Moritz, Robin F. A (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ethology Ecology & Evolution Vol. 19, no. 4 (2007), p. 263-273 ISSN: 0394-9370
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Co-evolution between parasites and their host can lead to dramatic changes in the life history of the host species. In this study we tested the male mating success of 31 honeybee (Apis mellifera) colonies infested with the brood parasitic mite Varroa destructor and analysed the consequences of sexual reproduction on colony survival in a closed population on a Mediterranean island. We found that colonies which successfully reproduced via males had a significantly increased mortality during the following season. They also showed a higher investment in the production of drones than unsuccessful ones, while overall colony size was not significantly different. Since honeybee colonies boost their mite population as soon as they start sexual male reproduction, drone production may result in increased mortality. Because this mechanism selects for colonies which produce relatively few or no male sexuals, this change in life history might form an evolutionary constraint for A. mellifera in its co-evolution with the V. destructor mite, as high numbers of males are essential in the highly polyandrous mating system of A. mellifera.


8.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Worker caste determination in the army ant Eciton burchellii
Jaffé, Rodolfo ; Kronauer, Daniel J. C. (coaut.) ; Kraus, Frank Bernhard (coaut.) ; Boomsma Jacobus J. (coaut.) ; Moritz, Robin F. A (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biology Letters Vol. 3, no. 5 (October 2007), p. 513-516 ISSN: 1744-9561
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Elaborate division of labour has contributed significantly to the ecological success of social insects. Division of labour is achieved either by behavioural task specialization or by morphological specialization of colony members. In physical caste systems, the diet and rearing environment of developing larvae is known to determine the phenotype of adult individuals, but recent studies have shown that genetic components also contribute to the determination of worker caste. One of the most extreme cases of worker caste differentiation occurs in the army ant genus Eciton, where queens mate with many males and colonies are therefore composed of numerous full-sister subfamilies. This high intracolonial genetic diversity, in combination with the extreme caste polymorphism, provides an excellent test system for studying the extent to which caste determination is genetically controlled. Here we show that genetic effects contribute significantly to worker caste fate in Eciton burchellii. We conclude that the combination of polyandry and genetic variation for caste determination may have facilitated the evolution of worker caste diversity in some lineages of social insects.