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2 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Muñoz Tenería, Fernando A.
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Ecological regime shift drives declining growth rates of sea turtles throughout the West Atlantic
Bjorndal, Karen A. ; Bolten, Alan B. (coaut.) ; Chaloupka, Milani (coaut.) ; Saba, Vincent S. (coaut.) ; Bellini, Cláudio (coaut.) ; Marcovaldi, Maria A. G. (coaut.) ; Santos, Armando J. B. (coaut.) ; Wurdig Bortolon, Luis Felipe (coaut.) ; Meylan, Anne B. (coaut.) ; Meylan, Peter A. (coaut.) ; Gray, Jennifer (coaut.) ; Hardy, Robert (coaut.) ; Brost, Beth (coaut.) ; Bresette, Michael (coaut.) ; Gorham, Jonathan C. (coaut.) ; Connett, Stephen (coaut.) ; Van Sciver Crouchley, Barbara (coaut.) ; Dawson, Mike (coaut.) ; Hayes, Deborah (coaut.) ; Diez, Carlos E. (coaut.) ; van Dam, Robert P. (coaut.) ; Willis, Sue (coaut.) ; Nava, Mabel (coaut.) ; Hart, Kristen M. (coaut.) ; Cherkiss, Michael S. (coaut.) ; Crowder, Andrew G. (coaut.) ; Pollock, Clayton (coaut.) ; Hillis-Starr, Zandy (coaut.) ; Muñoz Tenería, Fernando A. (coaut.) ; Herrera Pavón, Roberto Luis (coaut.) ; Labrada Martagón, Vanessa (coaut.) ; Lorences, Armando (coaut.) ; Negrete Philippe, Ana (coaut.) ; Lamont, Margaret M. (coaut.) ; Foley, Allen M. (coaut.) ; Bailey, Rhonda (coaut.) ; Carthy, Raymond R. (coaut.) ; Scarpino, Russell (coaut.) ; McMichael, Erin (coaut.) ; Provancha, Jane A. (coaut.) ; Brooks, Annabelle (coaut.) ; Jardim, Adriana (coaut.) ; López Mendilaharsu, Maria de los Milagros (coaut.) ; González Paredes, Daniel (coaut.) ; Estrades, Andrés (coaut.) ; Fallabrino, Alejandro (coaut.) ; Martínez-Souza, Gustavo (coaut.) ; Vélez Rubio, Gabriela M. (coaut.) ; Boulon Jr., Ralf H. (coaut.) ; Collazo, Jaime A. (coaut.) ; Wershoven, Robert (coaut.) ; Guzmán Hernández, Vicente (coaut.) ; Stringell, Thomas B. (coaut.) ; Sanghera, Amdeep (coaut.) ; Richardson, Peter B. (coaut.) ; Broderick, Annette C. (coaut.) ; Phillips, Quinton (coaut.) ; Calosso, Marta (coaut.) ; Claydon, John A. B. (coaut.) ; Metz, Tasha L. (coaut.) ; Gordon, Amanda L. (coaut.) ; Landry Jr., Andre M. (coaut.) ; Shaver, Donna J. (coaut.) ; Blumenthal, Janice (coaut.) ; Collyer, Lucy (coaut.) ; Godley, Brendan J. (coaut.) ; McGowan, Andrew (coaut.) ; Witt, Matthew J. (coaut.) ; Campbell, Cathi L. (coaut.) ; Lagueux, Cynthia J. (coaut.) ; Bethel, Thomas L. (coaut.) ; Kenyon, Lory (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Global Change Biology Vol. 23, no. 11 (November 2017), p. 4556–4568 ISSN: 1365-2486
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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Somatic growth is an integrated, individual-based response to environmental conditions, especially in ectotherms. Growth dynamics of large, mobile animals are particularly useful as bio-indicators of environmental change at regional scales. We assembled growth rate data from throughout the West Atlantic for green turtles, Chelonia mydas, which are long-lived, highly migratory, primarily herbivorous mega-consumers that may migrate over hundreds to thousands of kilometers. Our dataset, the largest ever compiled for sea turtles, has 9690 growth increments from 30 sites from Bermuda to Uruguay from 1973 to 2015. Using generalized additive mixed models, we evaluated covariates that could affect growth rates; body size, diet, and year have significant effects on growth. Growth increases in early years until 1999, then declines by 26% to 2015. The temporal (year) effect is of particular interest because two carnivorous species of sea turtles—hawksbills, Eretmochelys imbricata, and loggerheads, Caretta caretta—exhibited similar significant declines in growth rates starting in 1997 in the West Atlantic, based on previous studies. These synchronous declines in productivity among three sea turtle species across a trophic spectrum provide strong evidence that an ecological regime shift (ERS) in the Atlantic is driving growth dynamics. The ERS resulted from a synergy of the 1997/1998 El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO)—the strongest on record—combined with an unprecedented warming rate over the last two to three decades. Further support is provided by the strong correlations between annualized mean growth rates of green turtles and both sea surface temperatures (SST) in the West Atlantic for years of declining growth rates (r = −.94) and the Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) for all years (r = .74). Granger-causality analysis also supports the latter finding.

We discuss multiple stressors that could reinforce and prolong the effect of the ERS. This study.


2.
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Somatic growth rates of immature green turtles Chelonia mydas inhabiting the foraging ground Akumal bay in the Mexican Caribbean Sea
Labrada Martagón, Vanessa (coaut.) ; Muñoz Tenería, Fernando A. (coaut.) ; Herrera Pavón, Roberto Luis (coaut.) ; Negrete Philippe, Ana C. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Vol. 487 (February 2017), p. 68-78 ISSN: 0022-0981
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Growth dynamics helps to elucidate demographic aspects, such as age at specific size and size at maturity or first reproduction, which are important for sea turtle management. The Mexican Caribbean Sea is an important feeding ground for green turtles, but demographic data for the turtles are lacking. Size-based growth rates of immature green turtles inhabiting a foraging ground at Akumal Bay (20°24'0″N and 87°19'16″W) were obtained by using a mixed longitudinal sampling design from historic mark–recapture data (2004–2014). Curved carapace length (CCL) of immature turtles at first capture ranged from 27.8–81.0 cm and minimum size at recruitment was 27.8 cm CCL. Recapture intervals ranged from 1 to 49 months, 72% of the recaptures (n=172) occurred in less than a year and 90% before 1.5 years. A monotonic size-specific growth function displays the maximum growth rate (6.25 cm yr−¹) at about 46–48 cm CCL before starts declining steadily at> 60 cm CCL. Mean size presented a non-linear relationship with growth rates and year of capture had a negative linear effect over growth; the lowest annual mean growth rates were registered during 2009 and 2012. Based on GAM predictions an immature sea turtle recruited to the feeding ground (28 cm CCL) would require between 13 and 14 years to reach the average nesting size, supporting field observations. A negative linear relationship between annual mean growth rate and the relative estimated sea turtle abundance (p=0.001) suggests a density-dependent effect. The quantitative information presented will help understand life history patterns and provide a baseline to assess future dynamics of this green turtle population.