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2 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Omeja, Patrick A.
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1.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Park isolation in anthropogenic landscapes: land change and livelihoods at park boundaries in the African Albertine Rift
Salerno, Jonathan ; Chapman, Colin A. (coaut.) ; Diem, Jeremy E. (coaut.) ; Dowhaniuk, Nicholas (coaut.) ; Goldman, Abraham (coaut.) ; MacKenzie, Catrina A. (coaut.) ; Omeja, Patrick Aria (coaut.) ; Palace, Michael W. (coaut.) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (coaut.) ; Ryan, Sadie J. (coaut.) ; Hartter, Joel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Regional Environmental Change Vol. 18, no. 3 (March 2018), p. 913–928 ISSN: 1436-3798
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Landscapes are changing rapidly in regions where rural people live adjacent to protected parks and reserves. This is the case in highland East Africa, where many parks are increasingly isolated in a matrix of small farms and settlements. In this review, we synthesize published findings and extant data sources to assess the processes and outcomes of park isolation, with a regional focus on people’s livelihoods at park boundaries in the Ugandan Albertine Rift. The region maintains exceptionally high rural population density and growth and is classified as a global biodiversity hotspot. In addition to the impacts of increasing numbers of people, our synthesis highlights compounding factors—changing climate, increasing land value and variable tenure, and declining farm yields—that accelerate effects of population growth on park isolation and widespread landscape change. Unpacking these processes at the regional scale identifies outcomes of isolation in the unprotected landscape—high frequency of human-wildlife conflict, potential for zoonotic disease transmission, land and resource competition, and declining wildlife populations in forest fragments. We recommend a strategy for the management of isolated parks that includes augmenting outreach by park authorities and supporting community needs in the human landscape, for example through healthcare services, while also maintaining hard park boundaries through traditional protectionism. Even in cases where conservation refers to biodiversity in isolated parks, landscape strategies must include an understanding of the local livelihood context in order to ensure long-term sustainable biodiversity protection.


2.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Primate population dynamics: variation in abundance over space and time
Chapman, Colin A. ; Bortolamiol, Sarah (coaut.) ; Matsuda, Ikki (coaut.) ; Omeja, Patrick A. (coaut.) ; Pozzan Paim, Fernanda (coaut.) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (coaut.) ; Sengupta, Raja (coaut.) ; Valenta, Kim (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biodiversity and Conservation Vol. 27, no. 5 (April 2018), p. 1221–1238 ISSN: 0960-3115
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The rapid disappearance of tropical forests, the potential impacts of climate change, and the increasing threats of bushmeat hunting to wildlife, makes it imperative that we understand wildlife population dynamics. With long-lived animals this requires extensive, long-term data, but such data is often lacking. Here we present longitudinal data documenting changes in primate abundance over 45 years at eight sites in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Complex patterns of change in primate abundance were dependent on site, sampling year, and species, but all species, except blue monkeys, colonized regenerating forest, indicating that park-wide populations are increasing. At two paired sites, we found that while the primate populations in the regenerating forests had increased from nothing to a substantial size, there was little evidence of a decline in the source populations in old-growth forest, with the possible exception of mangabeys at one of the paired sites. Censuses conducted in logged forest since 1970 demonstrated that for all species, except black-and-white colobus, the encounter rate was higher in the old-growth and lightly-logged forest than in heavily-logged forest. Black-and-white colobus generally showed the opposite trend and were most common in the heavily-logged forest in all but the first year of monitoring after logging, when they were most common in the lightly-logged forest. Overall, except for blue monkey populations which are declining, primate populations in Kibale National Park are growing; in fact the endangered red colobus populations have an annual growth rate of 3%. These finding present a positive conservation message and indicate that the Uganda Wildlife Authority is being effective in managing its biodiversity; however, with constant poaching pressure and changes such as the exponential growth of elephant populations that could cause forest degradation, continued monitoring and modification of conservation plans are needed.