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28 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Philpott, Stacy M.
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1.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Agroecological pest management in the city: experiences from California and Chiapas
Morales, H. ; Ferguson, Bruce G. (coaut.) (1967-) ; Marín, Linda E. (coaut.) ; Gutiérrez Navarrete, Dario (coaut.) ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Sustainability Vol. 10, no. 6, 2068 (June 2018) ISSN: 2071-1050
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Urban gardens are a prominent part of agricultural systems, providing food security and access within cities; however, we still lack sufficient knowledge and general principles about how to manage pests in urban agroecosystems in distinct regions. We surveyed natural enemies (ladybeetles and parasitoids) and conducted sentinel pest removal experiments to explore local management factors and landscape characteristics that influence the provisioning of pest control services in California, USA, and Chiapas, Mexico. We worked in 29 gardens across the two locations. In each location, we collected data on garden vegetation, floral availability, ground cover management, and the percentage of natural, urban, and agricultural land cover in the surrounding landscape. We sampled ladybeetles, Chalcidoidea, and Ichneumonoidea parasitoids with sticky traps, and monitored the removal of three different pest species. Ladybeetle abundance did not differ between locations; abundance decreased with garden size and with tree cover and increased with herbaceous richness, floral abundance, and barren land cover. Chalcicoidea and Ichneumonoidea parasitoids were more abundant in Chiapas.

Chalcicoidea abundance decreased with herbaceous richness and with urban cover. Ichneumonoidea abundance increased with mulch and bare ground cover, garden size, garden age, and with agriculture land cover but decreased with tree richness and urban cover. Predators removed between 15–100% of sentinel prey within 24 h but prey removal was greater in California. Generally, prey removal increased with vegetation diversity, floral abundance, mulch cover, and urban land cover, but declined with vegetation cover and bare ground. Although some factors had consistent effects on natural enemies and pest control in the two locations, many did not; thus, we still need more comparative work to further develop our understanding of general principles governing conservation biological control in urban settings.


2.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Influences of species interactions with aggressive ants and habitat filtering on nest colonization and community composition of arboreal twig-nesting ants
Philpott, Stacy M. (autora) ; Serber, Zachary (autor) ; De la Mora, Aldo (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Environmental Entomology Vol. 47, no. 2 (April 2018), p. 309–317 ISSN: 1938-2936
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Ant community assembly is driven by many factors including species interactions (e.g., competition, predation, parasitism), habitat filtering (e.g., vegetation differences, microclimate, food and nesting resources), and dispersal. Canopy ant communities, including dominant and twig-nesting ants, are structured by all these different factors, but we know less about the impacts of species interactions and habitat filters acting at the colonization or recruitment stage. We examined occupation of artificial twig nests placed in shade trees in coffee agroecosystems. We asked whether species interactions—aggression from the dominant canopy ant, Azteca sericeasur Longino (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)—or habitat filtering—species of tree where nests were placed or surrounding vegetation—influence colonization, species richness, and community composition of twig-nesting ants. We found 20 species of ants occupying artificial nests. Nest occupation was lower on trees with A. sericeasur , but did not differ depending on tree species or surrounding vegetation. Yet, there were species-specific differences in occupation depending on A. sericeasur presence and tree species. Ant species richness did not vary with A. sericeasur presence or tree species. Community composition varied with A. sericeasur presence and surrounding vegetation. Our results suggest that species interactions with dominant ants are important determinants of colonization and community composition of twig-nesting ants. Habitat filtering at the level of tree species did not have strong effects on twig-nesting ants, but changes in coffee management may contribute to differences in community composition with important implications for ant conservation in agricultural landscapes, as well as biological control of coffee pests.


3.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Response of ground spiders to local and landscape factors in a Mexican coffee landscape
Marín, Linda (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut.) ; De la Mora, Aldo (coaut.) ; Ibarra Núñez, Guillermo (coaut.) ; Tryban, Stephen (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment Vol. 222, (April 2016), p. 80–92 ISSN: 0167-8809
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

In order to secure the provisioning of ecosystem services, detailed analyses of the relationship between biodiversity and agriculture are required. We studied ground spider diversity in a 52 km² coffee landscape in Southern Mexico, and asked the following questions. (1) How do coffee management variables and local microhabitat variables change among coffee agroecosystems and forest sites and across seasons? (2) How does coffee management affect ground spider richness, abundance, and composition? (3) How do local and landscape factors in fl uence ground spider richness and abundance? and (4) What role does seasonality play in shaping ground spider communities? During the dry season and rainy season of 2011 we sampled ground active spiders using pitfall traps from high and low shade coffee agroecosystems (27 sites) and from forest (10 sites). On local scale, for each 20 m × 20 m site we measured leaf litter variables, invertebrate dry biomass, slope of the terrain and elevation, and management variables such as canopy cover, shade tree richness, shade tree density and proportion of Inga trees. At the landscape scale, we measured distance to the nearest forest and percent of forest in buffers of 500 m. Results show that agricultural management had a strong influence on spider richness and abundance. Across seasons, local spider richness and abundance had or tended to have higher values in the low-shade coffee. Spider richness and abundance were strongly in fl uenced by physiographic and local predictors and weakly by landscape predictors. Furthermore, predictors varied with seasonality, with slope of the terrain being the strongest predictor in the dry season and canopy cover being the strongest predictor in the rainy season. We conclude that ground active spiders in this coffee landscape are greatly in fl uenced by coffee management and local characteristics.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Local and Landscape Drivers of Ant Parasitism in a Coffee Landscape
De la Mora, Aldo ; Pérez Lachaud, Gabriela (coaut.) ; Lachaud, Jean Paul (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Environmental Entomology Vol. 44, no. 4 (Aug. 2015), p. 939-950 ISSN: 0046-225X
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Parasitism of ants that nest in rotting wood by eucharitid wasps was studied in order to examine whether habitat and season influence ant parasitism, vegetation complexity and agrochemical use correlate with ant parasitism, and whether specific local and landscape features of agricultural landscapes correlate with changes in ant parasitism. In a coffee landscape, 30 coffee and 10 forest sites were selected in which local management (e.g., vegetation, agrochemical use) and landscape features (e.g., distance to forest, percent of rustic coffee nearby) were characterized. Rotten logs were sampled and ant cocoons were collected from logs and cocoons were monitored for parasitoid emergence. Sixteen ant morphospecies in three ant subfamilies (Ectatomminae, Ponerinae, and Formicinae) were found. Seven ant species parasitized by two genera of Eucharitidae parasitoids (Kapala and Obeza) were reported and some ant–eucharitid associations were new. According to evaluated metrics, parasitism did not differ with habitat (forest, high-shade coffee, low-shade coffee), but did increase in the dry season for Gnamptogenys ants. Parasitism increased with vegetation complexity for Gnamptogenys and Pachycondyla and was high in sites with both high and low agrochemical use. Two landscape variables and two local factors positively correlated with parasitism for some ant genera and species. Thus, differences in vegetation complexity at the local and landscape scale and agrochemical use in coffee landscapes alter ecological interactions between parasitoids and their ant hosts.


5.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Local, landscape, and diversity drivers of predation services provided by ants in a coffee landscape in Chiapas, Mexico
De la Mora Rodríguez, Aldo Alejandro ; García Ballinas, José Álvaro (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment Vol. 201, (March 2015), p. 83–91 ISSN: 0167-8809
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Agricultural management and the landscape surrounding farms impact biological diversity and ecosystem services, such as predation, in agroecosystems. Diversified coffee agroecosystems harbor biodiversity, and maintain ecosystem services, especially when in complex landscapes, and when diversity of organisms providing services is maintained. But few have examined whether biological diversity, per se, or the local and landscape habitat features are stronger drivers of the services provided. We studied the relationships between local characteristics associated with agricultural management (vegetation complexity and agrochemical use), landscape surroundings of farms, abundance and richness of ants, and predation services provided by ants in a tropical coffee landscape. Specifically, we tested whether: (1) ants remove prey items and prey removal differs in the wet and dry season, (2) ant prey removal differs in farms that vary in vegetation complexity and agrochemical use, (3) ant prey removal differs with changes in ant abundance and species richness, and (4) ant prey removal differs with changes in local and landscape characteristics. We established sites across a range of coffee management systems, at varying distances to forest fragments, and in forest fragments and examined prey removal by ants on the ground, coffee branches, and shade tree trunks in the wet and dry season. Prey removal did not differ with season. Prey removal on the ground increased within increases in ant abundance and richness, and number of hollow coffee twigs.

Prey removal on coffee plants decreased with vegetation complexity, but increased with ant abundance and richness, coffee density (a local factor), and rustic coffee within 200 m (a landscape factor). Prey removal on trees declined with vegetation complexity, but increased with abundance and richness of ants. Characteristics of the ant community were consistent predictors of prey removal, whereas local and landscape habitat features were less important, and only three habitat features correlated with prey removal. Our results demonstrate the positive effects of ant diversity for predatory function, and that promoting pest control services within coffee agroecosystems may be best accomplished by manipulating ant abundance and richness, or vegetation factors that correlate with ants.


6.
Tesis - Doctorado
Hormigas en cafetales: estudio sobre la calidad de la matriz en fincas cafetaleras en el Soconusco, Chiapas / Aldo Alejandro de la Mora Rodríguez
De la Mora Rodríguez, Aldo Alejandro ; Ibarra Núñez, Guillermo (director) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (codirectora) ; Lachaud, Jean Paul (asesor) ; Pérez Lachaud, Gabriela (asesora) ; Soto Pinto, Lorena (asesora) (1958-) ;
Tapachula, Chiapas, México : El Colegio de la Frontera Sur , 2014
Clasificación: TE/595.796097275 / M67
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040005482 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030008232 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010017601 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020013100 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
ECO050005678 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Resumen en español

La intensificación de agroecosistemas afecta la diversidad de la flora y fauna. Los objetivos fueron: conocer los efectos de la intensificación agronómica de cafetales y de los remanentes de bosque sobre la diversidad de hormigas, la relación entre la diversidad de hormigas y la remoción de insectos presa por parte de éstas y finalmente, analizar cómo afectan las variables locales y de paisaje a la tasa de parasitismo en las diferentes especies de hormigas en un agroecosistema de café. Se establecieron 40 sitios experimentales (400 m² cada uno) en siete fincas de café y en fragmentos de bosque en el Soconusco, Chiapas. Se calculó un índice de complejidad de vegetación (IVC), y mediante encuestas al personal de las fincas sobre el uso y frecuencia de aplicación de agroquímicos se elaboró un índice de agroquímicos (IA). Con los datos de la vegetación se clasificaron los 40 sitios experimentales en diferentes manejos del área de estudio en: monocultivos (17 sitios), policultivos (13 sitios) y bosques (10 sitios). Con los programas ArcView, y ArcMap se calcularon las siguientes variables de paisaje: distancia de cada sitio al borde del bosque, áreas con radios de 50, 200 y 500 m para sitios de bosques y de café de tipo rústico. En cada sitio, en las temporadas de secas y lluvias, se colectaron las hormigas del suelo, cafetos y arboles con diversos métodos de muestreo.

Los resultados de esta investigación sugieren que los factores de manejo agronómico y la influencia de fragmentos de bosque afectan la diversidad y abundancia de hormigas e indirectamente influyen positivamente en los servicios ecosistémicos que las hormigas ofrecen. Sin embargo, la intensidad de parasitismo sufrido por las hormigas es afectada principalmente por factores del paisaje, la cantidad de humus y numero de pupas para ciertos grupos de hormigas. Se propone realizar acciones de diversificación de las zonas de café empleando diferentes especies de árboles para sombra (preferentemente nativos) o plantar diversas especies de Inga, con el fin de proveer refugio y alimentación para los diferentes organismos que existen y así favorecer las interacciones ecológicas entre ellos, favoreciendo una mejor calidad de la matriz agrícola que promovería sustentabilidad, economía y salud de los productores en la región.

Índice

Resumen
Capítulo I
1.1. Introducción General
1.1.1. Contexto global de la biodiversidad
1.1.2. Agroecosistemas de café: Factores de intensificación y de paisaje que inciden en la funcionalidad del agroecosistema
1.1.3. Hormigas como indicadoras de diversidad y su importancia ecológica
1.2 Hipótesis y Objetivos
1.2.1. Hipótesis general e hipótesis particulares
1.2.2 Objetivo general y objetivos particulares
1.3. Metodología General
1.3.1. Caracterización del área de estudio y técnicas de muestreo utilizadas
1.3.2. Análisis estadísticos
Capítulo II. Factores locales y de paisaje promueven la biodiversidad de cuatro grupos de hormigas en paisajes cafetaleros (Local and landscape drivers of biodiversity of four guilds of ants in coffee landscapes. Biodiversity Conservation, 22:871-888)
Capítulo III. Factores locales, del paisaje y de diversidad promueven los servicios ecosistemicos de depredación por hormigas en cafetales (Local, landscape, and diversity drivers of predation services provided by ants in coffee landscapes. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, Manuscript re-submitted
Number : AGEE10440)
Capítulo IV. Factores locales y de paisaje promueven el parasitismo en un paisaje de café (Local and landscape drivers of ant parasitism in a coffee landscape. Environmental Entomology, Manuscrito sometido)
Capítulo V. Conclusiones y Recomendaciones
Capítulo VI.- Literatura Citada
Anexo 1
Acuse de artículo aceptado: Local and landscape drivers of biodiversity of four guilds of ants in coffee landscapes. Biodiversity Conservation, 22:871-888
Anexo 2
Normas editoriales de Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Environment


7.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Local and landscape drivers of biodiversity of four groups of ants in coffee landscapes
De la Mora, Aldo ; Murnen, C. J. (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biodiversity and Conservation Vol. 22, no. 4 (2013), p. 871–888 ISSN: 0960-3115
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Agriculture of varying management intensity dominates fragmented tropical areas and differentially impacts organisms across and within taxa. We examined impacts of local and landscape characteristics on four groups of ants in an agricultural landscape in Chiapas, Mexico comprised of forest fragments and coffee agroecosystems varying in habitat quality. We sampled ground ants found in leaf litter and rotten logs and arboreal ants found in hollow coffee twigs and on tree trunks. Then using vegetation and agro- chemical indices and conditional inference trees, we examined the relative importance of local (e.g. vegetation, elevation, agrochemical) and landscape variables (e.g. distance to and amount of nearby forest and rustic coffee) for predicting richness and abundance of ants. Leaf litter ant abundance increased with vegetation complexity; richness and abun- dance of ants from rotten logs, twig-nests, and tree trunks were not affected by vegetation complexity. Agrochemical use did not affect species richness or abundance of any ant group. Several local factors (including humus mass, degree of decay of logs, number of hollow twigs, tree circumference, and absence of fertilizers) were significant positive predictors of abundance and richness of some ant groups. Two landscape factors (forest within 200 m, and distance from forest) predicted richness and abundance of twig-nesting and leaf litter ants. Thus, different ant groups were influenced by different characteristics of agricultural landscapes, but all responded primarily to local characteristics. Given that ants provide ecosystem services (e.g. pest control) in coffee farms, understanding ant responses to local and landscape characteristics will likely inform farm management decisions.


8.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Do species sorting and mass effects drive assembly in tropical agroecological landscape mosaics
Livingston, George A. ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut.) ; De la Mora Rodríguez, Aldo Alejandro (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biotropica Vol. 45. no. 1 (January 2012), p. 10-17 ISSN: 0006-3606
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
51646-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en español

Evaluaciones recientes sobre la diversidad en agroecosistemas tropicales han mostrado una alta diversidad taxonómica y funcional en sistemas con un bajo manejo agronómico de intensificación. Esta diversidad es el producto del ensamblaje en la comunidad. Sin embargo, debido a que los agroecosistemas son ambientes nuevos comparados con sistemas naturales, y ocurren en paisajes fragmentados, el proceso de ensamblaje que se forman en las comunidades de agroecosistemas es pobremente entendible. Dos modelos han sido propuestos para explicar el ensamblaje a nivel de paisaje: (1) Compromiso en realización de las especies a través de los hábitats (ordenamiento de especies) y (2) El dinamismo de fuente sumidero entre hábitats con calidades diferentes (efecto de masa). Estos modelos no han sido evaluados en agroecosistemas tropicales ampliamente. Utilizamos una extensa base de datos en una comunidad de hormigas tropicales que anidan en ramas de cinco microhabitats en cafetales de sombra, con el fin de evaluar ambos modelos (ordenamiento de especies y efecto de masa) o un modelo mixto. Para estudiar las diferencias entre estos modelos realizamos: análisis de similitud-comunidad y una prueba de varianza de descomposición sobre un microhábitat focal (finca de café con sombra moderada) para particionar la varianza de la comunidad en un componente espacial y ambiental. Para identificar la fuente de hábitat por efecto de masa y evaluar su solidez, medimos la dispersión de alados (reinas aladas), nidos artificiales, tamaño de nidos y colonias en árboles y plantas de café.

Encontramos un significancia ambiental y espacial, así como evidencia para ambos modelos:ordenamiento de especies y efecto de masa. Así también, que el efecto de modelo de ordenamiento de especies ocurre entre las especies más comunes, mientras el efecto de masa puede ser mas entre especies raras que provienen del dosel. Nuestros resultados indican que ambos modelos de metacomunidad (ordenamiento de especies y efecto de masa) ocurren en fragmentos de paisajes tropicales, pero estos pueden no ser evaluados igualmente en todas las especies en comunidades, gradientes de hábitats o en tiempo.

Resumen en inglés

Recent assessments of biodiversity in tropical agroecosystems have revealed surprisingly high functional and taxonomic diversity in systems with low management intensity. This biodiversity is the product of community assembly. Because agroecosystems are novel ecosystems and occur in landscape mosaics, the assembly processes generating communities in agroecosystems are poorly resolved. Broadly, two models have been proposed to explain landscape assembly: trade-offs in species performance across habitats (species sorting) and source-sink dynamics between habitats of differential quality (mass effects). These models are largely untested in tropical agroecosystems. We utilize an extensive data set on a tropical twig-nesting ant community from five microhabitat types in a shaded coffee agroecosystem to test for species sorting, mass effects, or a mixed model. To test among these models, we used community similarity and a variance decomposition on a focal microhabitat (a moderate-shade coffee farm) to partition community variance into spatial and environmental components. To identify the source habitat for mass effects and assess their strength, we measured dispersing alates (winged reproductives), artificial nests, and colony and nest size in shade trees and coffee. We found significant environmental and spatial signal and evidence for both species sorting and mass effects. We find sorting occurs among common species, but that mass effects are prevalent among rare species and likely originate in the shade trees. Our results indicate that both metacommunity models occur in tropical landscape mosaics, but they may not apply equally to all species in communities, habitat gradients, or timescales.


9.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Azteca instabilis ants and the defence of a coffee shade tree: an ant-plant association without mutual rewards in Chiapas, México
Gonthier, David J. ; Pardee, Gabriella L. (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Tropical Ecology Vol. 26, part 3 (January 2010), p. 343-346 ISSN: 0266-4674
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
49288-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) are important predators of herbivorous insects on plants (Rosumek et al. 2009). Ant removal or absence may result in negative indirect effects on plants, as herbivore abundance and herbivory increase and plant growth and reproduction decline (Rosumek et al. 2009, Schmitz et al. 2000). Ant presence on plants often results from a mutualistic interaction. For example, strong highly coevolved ant–plant mutualisms are found on myrmecophytic plants that house ants in domatia (specialized nesting sites). Weaker mutualistic associations are found with myrmecophilic plants that only offer extra-floral nectaries (EFNs) or food bodies to attract ants, or on other plants hosting honeydew-producing hemipterans (indirect ant–plant interactions) that mediate ant abundance (Hölldobler & Wilson 1990). However, in most cases, plants and arboreal ants form more passive associations, where ants nest in the natural cavities of branches or bark, or construct carton nests on plant substrates (Hölldobler & Wilson 1990) and the only reward plants offer these ants is the use of their substrates. In these situations the indirect effect of ants on plants is merely by chance, a byproduct of ant presence (byproduct association).


10.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Epiphyte biodiversity in the coffee agricultural matrix: canopy stratification and distance from forest fragments
Moorhead, Leigh C. (autor) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (autora) ; Bichier, Peter (autor) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 24, no. 3 (June 2010), p. 737-746 ISSN: 0888-8892
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
49277-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

La calidad de la matriz agrícola afecta profundamente a la biodiversidad y la dispersión en áreas agrícolas. Los agroecosistemas cafetaleros con una vegetación compleja mantienen riqueza de especies a mayores distancias del bosque. Las epífitas colonizan el dosel de árboles y proporcionan recursos para aves e insectos y, por lo tanto, los efectos de la producción agrícola sobre las epífitas pueden afectar a otras especies. Comparamos la diversidad, composición, diversidad y estratificación vertical de epífitas en un fragmento de bosque y en dos fincas cafetaleras con diferente intensidad de manejo en el sur de México. También examinamos la distribución espacial de epífitas respecto al fragmento de bosque para evaluar la calidad de los dos tipos de matriz para la conservación de epífitas. Muestreamos las epífitas vasculares en un fragmento de bosque, una finca con sombra policultivo y una con sombra monocultivo a 100 m, 200 m y 400 m del bosque. La riqueza de epífitas y orquídeas fue mayor en el bosque que en el bosque que el monocultivo pero la riqueza fue similar en el bosque y el policultivo. La composición de especies de epífitas difirió con el tipo de hábitat, pero no con la distancia al bosque.

En el bosque, las epífitas se distribuyeron en el dosel de los árboles, pero en las fincas se distribuyeron principalmente sobre los troncos y ramas mayores. La riqueza y similitud de especies de epífitas disminuyeron con la distancia al fragmento de bosque en elmonocultivo, pero la riqueza y la similitud con las especies de bosque no declinaron con la distancia al bosque en el policultivo. Esto sugiere que el café policultivo tiene un mayor valor de conservación. En contraste, el café monocultivo probablemente es un hábitat vertedero para epífitas en dispersión desde los bosques. Las fincas cafetaleras difieren de los bosques en términos del hábitat que proporcionan y la composición de especies, por lo tanto la protección de fragmentos de bosque es esencial para la conservación de epífitas. Sin embargo, las fincas cafetaleras con vegetación compleja pueden contribuir a la conservación de epífitas mejor que otros usos de suelo en los paisajes agrícolas.

Resumen en inglés

Quality of the agricultural matrix profoundly affects biodiversity and dispersal in agricultural areas. Vegetatively complex coffee agroecosystemsmaintain species richness at larger distances from the forest. Epiphytes colonize canopy trees and provide resources for birds and insects and thus effects of agricultural production on epiphytes may affect other species. We compared diversity, composition, and vertical stratification of epiphytes in a forest fragment and in two coffee farms differing in management intensity in southern Mexico. We also examined spatial distribution of epiphytes with respect to the forest fragment to examine quality of the two agricultural matrix types for epiphyte conservation. We sampled vascular epiphytes in a forest fragment, a shade polyculture farm, and a shade monoculture farm at 100 m, 200 m, and 400 m from the forest. Epiphyte and orchid richness was greater in the forest than in the monoculture but richness was similar in the forest and polyculture farm.

Epiphyte species composition differed with habitat type, but not with distance from the forest. In the forest, epiphytes were distributed throughout tree canopies, but in the farms, epiphytes were primarily found on trunks and larger branches. Epiphyte richness and species similarity to forest species declined with distance from the forest fragment in the monoculture, but richness and similarity to forest species did not decline with distance from forest in the polyculture. This suggests polyculture coffee has greater conservation value. In contrast, monoculture coffee is likely a sink habitat for epiphytes dispersing from forests into coffee. Coffee farms differ from forests in terms of the habitat they provide and species composition, thus protecting forest fragments is essential for epiphyte conservation. Nonetheless, in agricultural landscapes, vegetatively complex coffee farms may contribute to conservation of epiphytes more than other agricultural land uses.